Light Image Imagination

Light Image Imagination

MARTHA BLASSNIGG (EDITOR)
GUSTAV DEUTSCH
HANNA SCHIMEK
Series: Framing Film
Copyright Date: 2013
Pages: 312
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt45kdxn
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  • Book Info
    Light Image Imagination
    Book Description:

    Light Image Imagination is an anthology of text- and image-essays by international scholars and artists who lead critical discourses in audio-visual media history, practice and theory. The main focus of the contributions lies in discourses and topics around 19th and 20th century innovations in arts, media and technology, and their media-archaeological and philosophical foundations. It juxtaposes text and image-essays to stimulate dialogue and associative interconnections in order to discuss the creation, perception and projection of images (both mental and material) and their specific relationship with light and imagination. A key feature of both the individual contributions and the book as a whole is that disciplinary boundaries are challenged in order to amplify and enrich the thinking about mediated images. The anthology is accessible to a broad readership and will appeal especially to a constituency that views the boundaries between science, art and technology as a permeable and exciting territory to explore. The contributing authors and artists work at the interdisciplinary intersections of the Arts, Sciences and Humanities. Their expertise includes film and media theory, media archaeology, cinema history and theory, philosophy, history of science and technology, astronomy, computer music, literature studies, neuroscience, psychology, art history, art practice (painting, photography, film, video, digital arts; music composition).

    eISBN: 978-90-485-1943-9
    Subjects: Film Studies

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-8)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 9-10)
    Martha Blassnigg, Gustav Deutsch and Hanna Schimek
  4. Introduction
    (pp. 11-22)
    Martha Blassnigg

    Light Image Imaginationexplores the explicit, and more particularly the implicit, interrelationship between light and the creation of (re)mediated, (im)material, mental images.¹ It brings together authors and artists from a range of disciplines, including film and media theory, media archaeology, cinema history and theory, philosophy, history of science and technology, astronomy, computer music, literature studies, neuroscience, psychology, art history and art practice (art and media practice: painting, photography, film, video and digital arts; music composition). A key feature of both the individual contributions and the anthology as a whole is that disciplinary boundaries are extended in order to amplify and...

  5. 1 HOMAGE TO THE POLAR LIGHTS
    (pp. 23-28)
    Nina Czegledy
  6. CHAPTER 2 Colour and Sound: Transcending the Limits of the Senses
    (pp. 29-46)
    Fay Zika

    Perception through the senses is traditionally individuated on the basis of distinct sense organs of reception: vision for the eyes, hearing through the ears, touch for hands and skin, smell through the nose and taste through the mouth.¹ In this context, the possibility of transcending the limits between the different senses tends to be a matter assigned to the imagination, a faculty whose role is largely to extrapolate beyond the sensory content of perception.² The suggestion of seeing with one’s ears or hearing with one’s eyes verges towards the cranky or even the hallucinatory. My aim in this chapter is...

  7. 3 COGITATIVA
    (pp. 47-52)
    Kyrillos Sarris
  8. CHAPTER 4 Light Recording: Audiograms – Koenig’s Flame Pictures of Language
    (pp. 53-71)
    Marianne Kubaczek and Wolfgang Pircher

    The voice is one of our most complex features, and even today its technical simulation is, to a large extent, not possible. Voices are unique and recognisable; however, it is very difficult to imagine or remember them. What is lacking is their image. The following essay is about the history of some light traces of speech, which glimmered for a brief period in the second half of the 19th century. It is an event that marks a decisive juncture in the history of audiovisual media praxis: the attempt to make sound visible, and thus imaginable, without any recourse to music....

  9. 5 A WEDDING FROM THE ARCHIVE: PERSONS, DETAILS AND SITUATIONS (2003-) K295 (M)
    (pp. 72-76)
    George Hadjimichalis
  10. CHAPTER 6 Computer-Aided Musical Imagination
    (pp. 77-86)
    Eduardo Miranda

    Perhaps one of the most significant aspects differentiating humans from other animals is the fact that we are inherently musical. Our compulsion to listen to and appreciate sound arrangements beyond the mere purposes of linguistic communication is extraordinary. From the discovery almost three thousand years ago of the direct relationship between the pitch of a note and the length of a string or pipe to the latest computer models of human musical cognition and intelligence, composers have increasingly looked to science to provide new and challenging ways to study and compose music.

    Music is generally associated with the artistic expression...

  11. 7 TOPOI – SCAN-SPACE NO#4 – ARTIST’S STUDIO
    (pp. 87-92)
    Vicki Betsou
  12. CHAPTER 8 Light Is the Envelope: The Innovations of Paul Cézanne
    (pp. 93-108)
    Amy Ione

    In 1905, Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) told Émile Bernard (1868-1941): ‘Draw; but it is the reflection which envelops; light, through the general reflection, is the envelope’. (Rewald 1995: 316) An interesting theory, to be sure, but what precisely is he saying? Perhaps the larger point is that deducing firm principles about Cézanne’s approach to painting is not an easy task, particularly if we rely on his own words for insight. Indeed, Cézanne himself stated how limited words are in capturing artistic expression in an earlier letter to Bernard,² where he explained that ‘[t]alking about art is almost useless. (…) The man...

  13. 9 IMAGE IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER
    (pp. 109-114)
    Christina dePian
  14. CHAPTER 10 The ‘Delightful(l) Mind’: A Case for Aesthetic Intuition
    (pp. 115-144)
    Martha Blassnigg

    This chapter returns to the beginnings of mechanised optical serial image technologies during the 19th century and revisits accounts of the experiential dimensions of light in a specific context of artistic, philosophical and scientific histories of ideas on aesthetics, intuition and imagination. It will situate Etienne-Jules Marey’s work in parallel with discussions around the receiver’s pro-active engagement during perception in the philosophy of Henri Bergson and the works and writings on light by J.W. Goethe and J.M.W. Turner. In doing so it will address aspects that inform the particular condition of the ‘observing participant’ during the aesthetic engagement confronting contrasts...

  15. 11 DOMUS AUREA
    (pp. 145-150)
    Edgar Lissel
  16. CHAPTER 12 Designing and Revealing: Some Aspects of a Genealogy of Projection
    (pp. 151-187)
    Siegfried Zielinski

    Projection is a multifarious¹ concept with many different derivations (Herkünfte). It is equally at home in the sciences as well as in philosophy and psychoanalysis, painting and architecture, or media technologies, including cartography. In the second part of Kazimir Malevich’s great Suprematism manifesto, which he wrote in early 1922, the master of modern abstract art pointed out how impossible a task it is to really get to grips with this phenomenon.

    The human skull represents infinity for the movement of ideas. It resembles the universe, for it also has no roof or floor and has space for a projection apparatus...

  17. 13 LIGHT | IMAGE | IMAGINATION ATLAS
    (pp. 188-192)
    Gustav Deutsch and Hanna Schimek
  18. CHAPTER 14 Image, Light and the Passage to the Semi-Material Object
    (pp. 193-214)
    Michael Punt

    In October 1888, just two months after John Logie Baird was born, Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince made a contribution to the story of cinema by filming the people and traffic crossing the River Aire at Leeds Bridge in the north of England for a few seconds. Le Prince is believed to have used a single lens camera of his own design made at his workshop and which he called a ‘receiver’. Le Prince was born in 1842, the son of a middle-ranking officer in the French Army and was well positioned for his place in the history of photographic...

  19. 15 MNEMARCHIVE
    (pp. 215-220)
    Mark-Paul Meyer
  20. CHAPTER 16 Light in Black: On Olivier Deprez’ BlackBookBlack
    (pp. 221-235)
    Jan Baetens

    Black as, technically speaking, the absence of colour is often considered the opposite of light. Yet black in art should not be mistaken for the structural or functional counterpart of black in real life or in nature. Art does not coincide precisely with nature. It is instead – at least for those who do not stick to a strictly mimetic or realist approach of things aesthetic – nature transformed, corrected, expanded, reworked; in short, remade.¹ A good example of this antirealist stance is Stéphane Mallarmé’s influential thinking on literature. A key figure in the modern reinvention of spatial poetry and the spatial...

  21. 17 DISTORTED SPACES
    (pp. 236-240)
    Attila Csörgó
  22. CHAPTER 18 Colour Beyond the Sky: The Chromatic Revolution in Astronomy
    (pp. 241-268)
    Tim Otto Roth and Robert Fosbury

    These were the notable remarks, not by an astronomer but by the chief art critic of the British newspaperThe Guardian, Jonathan Jones. There is no doubt that the Hubble Space Telescope (Hubble or HST) has made breathtaking scientific discoveries in the years since its launch into Earth orbit in 1990. But the dramatic colour pictures of nebulae demonstrate that the art critic did not really refer to the achievements from the scientific perspective alone. In fact the visual revolution took place in the mind of the general public, changing forever their view of the nocturnal sky.

    Even the tabloid...

  23. 19 SUBLIMINAL SURFACES
    (pp. 269-274)
    Margarete Jahrmann
  24. NOTES; IMAGE ESSAYS
    (pp. 275-288)
  25. NOTES; ON LIGHT | IMAGE: A FORUM FOR ART AND SCIENCE
    (pp. 289-298)
    Gustav Deutsch and Hanna Schimek
  26. BIOGRAPHIES
    (pp. 299-310)