Attached to the World

Attached to the World: On the Anchoring and Strategy of Dutch Foreign Policy

Ben Knapen
Gera Arts
Yvonne Kleistra
Martijn Klem
Marijke Rem
Wetenschappelijke Raad voor het Regeringsbeleid
SCIENTIFIC COUNCIL FOR GOVERNMENT POLICY
Series: WRR Rapporten
Copyright Date: 2011
Pages: 150
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46mt75
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  • Book Info
    Attached to the World
    Book Description:

    Also available in Dutch "http://www.aup.nl/do.php?a=show_visitor_book&isbn=9789089643018">Aan het buitenland gehecht Few other countries are so interrelated with the world around us in political, economic, and social respects as the Netherlands. This means that the Dutch government needs to be alert in its response to the risks and opportunities presented by a rapidly changing world. Addressing this issue, the Scientific Council for Government Policy (wrr) offers some reflections in this report, guided by the question how the Netherlands can develop a foreign policy strategy that matches the changing power relations in the world and the radically changed character of international relations. The answer to this question is a reorientation. This means making transparent choices, making smarter use of Europe as our dominant arena, and, finally, choosing an approach that makes better use of the growing role of non-state actors. The report's recommendations not only underline the necessity of reorientation but also show how this could be accomplished in practice. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-1449-6
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. SUMMARY Attached to the World: On the Anchoring and Strategy of Dutch Foreign Policy
    (pp. 7-12)
  4. PREFACE
    (pp. 13-14)
  5. 1 MOTIVATION AND BACKGROUND: AN INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 15-24)

    Breathtaking and promising: this is what the newly appointed Dutch Cabinet called the developments in the world and the opportunities for the Netherlands three weeks after the fall of the Berlin Wall (Second Chamber 1989-1990, 14th assembly). The Soviet Union had pulled out of Afghanistan, the Berlin Wall had fallen, and the totalitarian Eastern Bloc had vanished. There was a peace dividend to be harvested, and a new, better world was in the offing.

    Moments of euphoria prove to be hazardous benchmarks, as the difference with the situation two decades afterward could hardly be greater. Whether it is globalisation, Europe,...

  6. 2 FROM FRAGMENTATION TO STRATEGY
    (pp. 25-58)

    On 28 December 1943, the then Minister of Foreign Affairs Eelco van Kleffens announced in a speech he delivered for Radio Orange that the Netherlands would be pursuing an ‘active’ foreign policy. The idea that an active approach of the Netherlands in international politics is absolutely essential for a small open society whose scope for action is co-dependent on others has been the core of Dutch foreign policy ever since. An active approach has become the trademark of the Netherlands abroad: we are represented at virtually every table and we participate in virtually everything.

    The upheavals of 1989 have not...

  7. 3 EUROPE: ARENA AND LINK
    (pp. 59-84)

    The awareness that more and more issues are transcending the national level and that cooperation is the only way towards achieving cross-border solutions is an important starting point for successful operation in the field of foreign policy. The Dutch government is thoroughly aware of this fact. As early as in its Re-evaluation Memorandum (Herijkingsnota), it observed that the Netherlands was becoming increasingly more intertwined with the rest of the world, because in an increasingly interdependent world, one’s own interests cannot be separated from those of others (tk 1994-1995, 24 337, no. 2: 11). In addition to this awareness of linked...

  8. 4 DIRECTING AND FACILITATING
    (pp. 85-106)

    In the previous chapters, we have underlined the necessity of a strategic foreign policy and a dedicated concentration on Europe as the most appropriate channel for realising this policy. The eu, the wealth of important non-state players in international relations, and successful niche policy require new ways of working: they require directing and facilitating.

    Re-evaluation experiences have shown that it is not easy to change course, to implement recommendations, or to change political mindsets (Van Beuningen 1997). New instruments have never been fully utilised, and the range of recommendations we have seen over the past five years, aiming to draw...

  9. 5 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
    (pp. 107-118)

    In the introduction to this report, we asked the question of how the Netherlands can develop a foreign policy considering the radically changing circumstances and conditions in which such a policy is now to be pursued. This is not a purely academic exercise. Society is suspicious about everything that is coming our way from other nations and the temptation to retreat behind Holland’s dikes is great. However, our international orientation is and remains a crucial source of prosperity and well-being. At the same time, the new international environment requires a new repertoire to sustain the relevance, credibility and conviction of...

  10. LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. 119-120)
  11. REFERENCES
    (pp. 121-134)
  12. LIST OF INTERVIEWEES
    (pp. 135-140)
  13. APPENDIX 1 THE INTERRELATEDNESS OF THE DUTCH ECONOMY
    (pp. 141-142)
  14. APPENDIX 2 THE INTERRELATEDNESS OF THE NETHERLANDS WITH OTHER NATIONS
    (pp. 143-146)
  15. APPENDIX 3 THE DUTCH NETWORK OF EMBASSIES IN A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
    (pp. 147-148)
  16. APPENDIX 4 SOVEREIGNTY IN EU MEMBER STATES: A COMPARISON
    (pp. 149-150)
  17. Back Matter
    (pp. 151-151)