What about Asia?

What about Asia?: Revisiting Asian Studies

Josine Stremmelaar
Paul van der Velde
Copyright Date: 2006
Pages: 108
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46n1pj
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  • Book Info
    What about Asia?
    Book Description:

    What about Asia? Revisiting Asian Studies brings together scholars from Asia, Europe and America to test the strength of a field of study which, considering the rise of Asia, should be gaining momentum. But is it? This is one of the many questions that the contributors to this volume ask themselves. In the past decade the use and legitimacy of area studies, and in particular Asian studies, have been passionately debated in conferences and academic journals. What about Asia? gives the current state of the debate on Asian studies by tackling the issue from a multiregional and interdisciplinary perspective. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-0459-6
    Subjects: Political Science, Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. What about Asia? Revisiting Asian Studies
    (pp. 7-14)
    Josine Stremmelaar and Paul van der Velde

    What about Asia? Revisiting Asian Studiesbrings together scholars from Asia, Europe and America to test the strength of a field of study which, considering the rise of Asia, should be gaining momentum. But is it? This is one of the many questions that the contributors to this volume ask themselves. In the past decade the use and legitimacy of area studies, and in particular Asian studies, have been passionately debated in conferences and academic journals. Questions have been raised in several issues of theIIAS Newsletterover the conceptualization of Asian studies and the kind of knowledge that Asia...

  4. Asian Studies and the Discourse of the Human Sciences
    (pp. 15-30)
    Gananath Obeyesekere

    I wrote the first draft of my bookImagining Karma(2002) as a senior fellow at IIAS and any one who has worked there must surely know the intellectual and personal debt one owes to Wim Stokhof whose devotion to the Institute and to Asian studies we are celebrating in this volume.

    In the aftermath ofImagining Karma, I have, over the last few years, tried to develop some of the ideas that were implicit in the book, specifically whether Buddhist epistemology could be useful for the theoretical or methodological discourses of the human sciences. I am not talking of...

  5. Area Studies in a Changing World
    (pp. 31-42)
    Peter van der Veer

    The study of Asian Languages and Cultures in the Netherlands and in the rest of Western Europe has been declining for the last 30 years. Less funding is available for what are called ‘exotica’ and fewer students are willing to take them up. Apart from Chinese and Japanese it is not immediately clear how knowledge of an Asian language would improve one’s prospects on the labour market. It is within this climate of decline that the International Institute for Asian Studies, combining social sciences and humanities, in the Netherlands has emerged. When it was founded with Wim Stokhof as its...

  6. Asia as a Form of Knowledge: of Analyses, (Re)Production, and Consumption
    (pp. 43-56)
    Shamsul A.B.

    In my encounter with Asian studies in the last 30 years I have always been fascinated, sometimes perplexed, by its overwhelming ‘fuzziness’. Perhaps I am the unlucky one. Most of my colleagues seemed to be quite clear in what they were doing and where they were going, but I was not. My predicament could have been the result of, and compounded by, the nature of the intellectual route that I have taken, one that continues to oscillate between certainties and uncertainties, between the macro and the micro, structure and agency, emic and etic and so on.

    I partly blame history...

  7. ‘A Little Knowledge is a Useful Thing’: Paradoxes in the Asian Studies Experience in Australia
    (pp. 57-68)
    Robert Cribb

    Asian studies is a strange beast. Until the 1950s there was no such thing. Scholars interested in Asia worked within disciplines such as history or anthropology, or in an esoteric field generally called Orientalism, which featured the meticulous study of classical texts from Asian religions and civilizations. Then Asia began to loom large in the world. Japan’s post-war recovery seemed to herald an Asian half-century in which Asia would not just catch up to the West but overtake it. Chinese communism presented the world with a dramatic experiment in massive social and cultural transformation which was - to different audiences...

  8. The Ebb and Flow of ASEM Studies
    (pp. 69-86)
    Yeo Lay Hwee

    When the first summit meeting among leaders from the fifteen European Union (EU) member states plus the President of the European Commission and their counterparts from ten East and Southeast Asian countries – China, Japan, South Korea and Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam – took place in Bangkok in March 1996, it generated quite a lot of interest from several quarters. Because of its high profile nature there was a lot of attention from the media, especially the Asian media.

    The fact that ASEM was not a one-off meeting, but was seen as signalling the start of...

  9. Re-orienting Asian Studies
    (pp. 87-104)
    Paul van der Velde

    This contribution will outline the developments in cooperation between the actors in the field of Asian Studies over the past thirteen years – a period which coincides with Wim Stokhof’s directorship of the IIAS. In describing these developments we should keep in mind that he has played an important role as an initiator and as a facilitator. However, this article is not solely about Stokhof per se but about the world of Asian studies in which he has operated. When using the terms Asia and Asian studies, Asia is meant here as the area east of the Indus River up...

  10. Abbreviations
    (pp. 105-106)
  11. Contributors
    (pp. 107-108)