Cliges

Cliges

Peter Messent
Steve Courtney
Copyright Date: 2006
Pages: 248
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46n572
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  • Book Info
    Cliges
    Book Description:

    In this verse translation of Cligès, written by Chrétien de Troyes circa 1176, Ruth Harwood Cline not only preserves the artistry of the original work but also captures the wit, irony, and striking emotional power of Chrétien's stylistic genius and highly structured form. The romance begins with the marriage of Cligès's parents and continues with the clandestine, mutual love of their son and his uncle's bride, Fenice. Cligès and Fenice are finally united after executing a false-death plot aided by black magic. With a thoroughness and clarity that will appeal to students and scholars of medieval literature, Cline's accessible translation effectively conveys the sparkle, pace, and intricate wordplay of Chrétien's love monologues, classic themes, and complex poetic devices. In addition, her introduction sheds new light on the transmission of British history and legend to the French court of Champagne. With themes that echo from the Tristan legend to Romeo and Juliet, Cligès is an exciting romance about young lovers who escape from an arranged match and find true love in marriage.

    eISBN: 978-0-8203-4052-4
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. List of Illustrations
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xi-xi)
  5. [Map]
    (pp. xii-xvi)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-14)
    PETER MESSENT and STEVE COURTNEY

    Joseph Hopkins Twichell was just two years out of Yale and studying for the clergy when he enlisted as chaplain of the Jackson Regiment of Daniel Sickles’s Excelsior Brigade in Lower Manhattan. The irony of a small-town New England Congregationalist minister-in-training shepherding the souls of tough Irish Catholics from the brickyards and tanneries of this neighborhood was not lost on Twichell. He wrote to his father on 22 April 1861: “If you ask why I fixed upon this particular regiment, composed as it is of rough, wicked men, I answer, that was the very reason. I saw that the companies...

  7. 1: April–July 1861: “THIS . . . REGIMENT, COMPOSED AS IT IS OF ROUGH, WICKED MEN”
    (pp. 15-44)

    Joseph Hopkins Twichell graduated from Yale College in 1859 and entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City that fall. There, he roomed with his closest college friend, Edward Carrington, a student at the Columbia School of Law. Other classmates from Yale College living in New York included Eugene Smith, always known by his college nickname “Mons”; Henry “Billy” Boies; and Robert Stiles, whose Southern background and political sympathies contrasted with that of his abolitionist friends.

    Twichell’s tenure at Union was set against a background of gathering violence. Sectional feeling between North and South had become increasingly bitter in the...

  8. 2: July 1861–March 1862: “BATTLE FIELDS ARE NOT FAR OFF”
    (pp. 45-106)

    After a long (i.e. slow) but quite comfortable journey we set feet on the soil of the capital at about 10 o’clock last night. The men on the whole behaved finely the whole way. We found no quarters provided for us and the entire Regiment bivouacked on the low damp ground adjoining the railroad. I lay right down without covering of any kind save the clothes I had on—not even a blanket—and slept like a log till the sun was up. . . . Although wet with dew and dirty from head to foot, I never felt better...

  9. 3: April–August 1862: “‘SIN ENTERED INTO THE WORLD AND DEATH THROUGH SIN’ KEPT RINGING THROUGH MY BRAIN”
    (pp. 107-171)

    After waiting—waiting—waiting—we at length have a prospect of seeing the actual front of war. I was telegraphed to last Thursday night at Washington, whither I went on Tuesday, to return at once as we were under marching orders. I rode the 50 miles intervening the Capital and camp as briskly as my good horse could carry me and found that the embarkation had commenced—although we did not leave our quarters till yesterday morning—even then 24 hours sooner than necessary, for the boys had to bivouac last night in the rain and suffered great discomfort, poor...

  10. 4: August–December 1862: “IF I MISTAKE NOT THERE IS A GENERAL FALLING BACK”
    (pp. 172-206)

    We left Alexandria by R.R. Monday night and were set down at 2 o’clock in the morning in a field just beyond Warrenton Junction. It was a cold night ride, so much so that I had no emotion to spare for Manassas or Bull Run or patriotism generally, being wholly occupied in a protracted shiver on the top of a baggage car. Next day . . . orders were received that we should make ready to march at 6 o’clock with three days rations, leaving all baggage behind. Rumors were prevalent that the Rail Road over which we had just...

  11. 5: January–April 1863: “I COME FACE TO FACE WITH THE HARD, BITTER FACT”
    (pp. 207-231)

    I am very tired tonight having been in the saddle a great part of the day, but I cannot think of going to bed without hailing the folks at home . . . and saluting you all, as I have saluted hundreds whom I love less, with a wish for your Happy New Year. . . . This morning everybody was astir early. . . . The air was full of cheery cries. “Happy New Year” rang out on every hand. My poor fellows seemed absolutely happy and it was a delight to see their lit up faces: yet they...

  12. 6: May–July 1863: “THOUSANDS OF SOULS HAVE BEEN CALLED TO SUDDEN JUDGEMENT”
    (pp. 232-256)

    My present situation is probably in many respects more singular and interesting than any in which I have been placed since I entered the army. I am here with only one attendant (a private of the 12th New Hampshire) in charge of thirteen wounded Confederate prisoners. During the night of Tuesday our forces recrossed the Rappahannock. The wounded were all brought over the afternoon before and disposed in the various houses available on this side [of] the river. I had been employed in their care and transportation till at dark I established myself at this place, set up my tent...

  13. 7: August–December 1863: “NEVER CAN WE FORGET THE YEAR 1863”
    (pp. 257-289)

    I enjoyed a delightful time at New Haven. Very few of my own class were there, but I found friends in abundance, and all apparently glad to see me. . . .

    Reaching New York Friday noon, I went first to see Gen. Sickles. I found his house—a charming place on the Bloomingdale Road—but he had gone out to ride. After chatting an hour with Mrs. Sickles and her Mother° I returned to the hotel promising to call next morning. I then found my General, sitting up on a sofa, writing letters on a table before him. He...

  14. 8: January–July 1864: “I HAVE BEEN UP TO MY ELBOWS IN BLOOD”
    (pp. 290-310)

    I feel it a real privilege to sit down tonight and address you. . . . I do not remember in a long time to have received such grateful tidings as the news of your illness abating. . . .

    1864 has shown us a savage front. Day before yesterday was, I think, without exception the coldest day I ever saw in Virginia. I found it impossible to keep comfortable, especially at night. On the 1st, though the mud was bottomless and the more formidable because it was just stiffening, I managed to flounder to Brigade Division and Corps Headquarters...

  15. AFTERWORD: THE LEE IVY
    (pp. 311-318)
    STEVE COURTNEY

    At noon on 22 June 1896, the president and corporators of Yale University climbed the steps to a wooden platform erected between two rows of elm trees on the Old Campus. Before them, ready for unveiling, was a block of red Maine granite supporting a statue of the late president of Yale, Theodore Dwight Woolsey, in mutton-chop whiskers and academic robe, his bronze eyes staring toward Phelps Gate.

    One of these men, the Reverend Joseph Hopkins Twichell, the senior member of the corporation, had known Woolsey well. The stern disciplinarian had been president of Yale when Twichell was an undergraduate...

  16. SOURCES
    (pp. 319-322)
  17. INDEX
    (pp. 323-333)