Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Southeastern United States

Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Southeastern United States: Dicotyledons

Robert K. Godfrey
Jean W. Wooten
Copyright Date: 1981
Pages: 944
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46ndpg
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  • Book Info
    Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Southeastern United States
    Book Description:

    This is the long-awaited second volume of Godfrey and Wooten's definitive survey of aquatic and wetland plants of the southeastern United States. It focuses on native and naturalized dicotyledons of the region and provides well-written, concise descriptions and keys for the identification of 1,084 species. A glossary of terms, list of references, separate indexes of common and scientific names, and nearly 400 well-executed drawings complete the volume. The first comprehensive survey of the aquatic and wetland plants of the Southeast, the Godfrey and Wooten volumes will prove invaluable to botanists, ecologists, college students, government agencies involved in land-use management, and nonspecialists interested in the plant life and ecology of the region.

    eISBN: 978-0-8203-4243-6
    Subjects: Botany & Plant Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Preface
    (pp. ix-x)
    ROBERT K. GODFREY and JEAN W. WOOTEN
  4. Introduction
    (pp. 1-6)

    The aim of this work is to aid in identifying native and naturalized dicotyledonous plants that inhabit aquatic and wetland places, places permanently or seasonally wet. It is not intended to be a study of ecology of hydrophytes. It is hoped that, as a taxonomic-floristic work, it will have value to ecologists, to governmental agencies concerned with environmental problems, to contractual firms engaged in environmental impact analyses, to individuals with general ecological interests, and to students in colleges and universities. Recognizing that these prospective users will have had diverse or limited experience in plant identification, we have sought to use,...

  5. Artificial Keys to the Higher Taxa of Aquatic and Wetland Dicotyledonous Plants of Southeastern United States
    (pp. 7-20)
  6. Descriptive Flora
    (pp. 21-886)

    Perennial herb, rhizomatous and forming colonies. Aerial stems erect, to about 12 dm tall, unbranched below, simple or with few ascending branches above, pubescent. Leaves alternate, petioles shorter than the blades, dilated basally and slightly sheathing the stem, blades ovate-cordate, subpalmately veined, margins entire; lower leaf surface sparsely short-pubescent, more heavily pubescent on the principal veins, usually becoming glabrous with age. Inflorescence a stalked, slender white raceme, curved-nodding distally, to about 3 dm long. Flowers without a perianth but each with a small subtending bract; stamens 6–8 (fewer by abortion), the filaments long and slender, much exceeding the carpels....

  7. Glossary
    (pp. 887-896)
  8. References
    (pp. 897-900)
  9. Index to Common Names
    (pp. 901-910)
  10. Index to Scientific Names
    (pp. 911-933)