Environmental Politics and Policy in the West, Revised Edition

Environmental Politics and Policy in the West, Revised Edition

Zachary A. Smith
John C. Freemuth
Copyright Date: 2007
Pages: 224
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46ns4p
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    Environmental Politics and Policy in the West, Revised Edition
    Book Description:

    Population growth and industrial development have put the wide-open spaces and natural resources that define the West under immense stress. Vested interests clash and come to terms over embattled resources such as water, minerals, and even open space. The federal government controls 40 to 80 percent of the land base in many western states; its sway over the futures of the West's communities and environment has prompted the development of unique policies and politics in the West.   Zachary A. Smith and John C. Freemuth bring together a roster of top scholars to explicate the issues noted above as well as other key questions in this new edition of Environmental Politics and Policy in the West, which was first published in 1993. This thoroughly revised and updated edition offers a comprehensive and current survey.   Contributors address the policy process as it affects western states, how bureaucracy and politics shape environmental dialogues in the West, how western states innovate environmental policies independently of Washington, and how and when science is involved (or ignored) in management of the West's federal lands. Experts in individual resource areas explore multifaceted issues such as the politics of dam removal and restoration, wildlife resource concerns, suburban sprawl and smart growth, the management of hard-rock mining, and the allocation of the West's tightly limited water resources. Contributors include: Leslie R. Alm, Carolyn D. Baber, Walter F. Baber, Robert V. Bartlett, Hugh Bartling, Matthew A. Cahn, R. McGreggor Cawley, Charles Davis, Sandra Davis, John C. Freemuth, Sheldon Kamieniecki, Matt Lindstrom, William R. Mangun, Denise McCain-Tharnstrom, Daniel McCool, Jaina L. Moan, and Zachary A. Smith.

    eISBN: 978-0-87081-999-5
    Subjects: Political Science, Environmental Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-xx)
  4. CHAPTER ONE THE POLICY PROCESS AND THE AMERICAN WEST: AN ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE
    (pp. 1-18)
    Leslie R. Alm

    Public policy making in the United States rests in a seemingly inexhaustible set of concepts and processes that have been described as predominantly “chaotic” (Birkland 2001, 3). The diligent student of American public policy must deal with the fact that public policy is said to be inclusive of all political activities and institutions, “from voting, political cultures, parties, legislatures, bureaucracies, international agencies, local governments, and back again, to the citizens who implement and evaluate public policies” ( John 2003, 483). One must differentiate between federalism and separation of powers, between pluralism and elitism, and between fragmentation and incrementalism. Simply put,...

  5. CHAPTER TWO BUREAUCRACY, POLITICS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY IN THE AMERICAN WEST
    (pp. 19-48)
    Matthew A. Cahn, Sheldon Kamieniecki and Denise McCain-Tharnstrom

    The West is blessed with the majority of America’s remaining natural resources, which are widely dispersed across the entire region. These resources are extremely valuable, and they require government monitoring and, in many cases, regulation. The federal government manages millions of acres of forests, national and state parks, and areas of scenic beauty, which include coastal regions, mountain ranges, and vast deserts. Many government agencies are also responsible for overseeing the extraction of oil, coal, natural gas, uranium, and a long list of metals and minerals. The federal government, therefore, plays a major role in natural resource management in this...

  6. CHAPTER THREE INNOVATION IN STATE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY: A VIEW FROM THE WEST
    (pp. 49-68)
    Robert V. Bartlett, Walter F. Baber and Carolyn D. Baber

    The conventional wisdom about state environmental policy holds that prior to the 1970s the states had been lethargic, even irresponsible, with little policy capacity and no political will or incentive to undertake new policies, much less exacting ones. Indeed, a general characterization of states before the 1970s holds them to have been “backwaters for the worst excesses of American politicians and bastions for the most shameful of American policies” (Lowry 1992, 10). The states were “mired in corruption, hostile to innovation, and unable to take a serious role in environmental policy out of fear of alienating key economic constituencies” (Rabe...

  7. CHAPTER FOUR SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND FEDERAL LANDS
    (pp. 69-88)
    R. McGreggor Cawley and John C. Freemuth

    A variety of factors make the western United States unique, but perhaps the most important is the amount of land owned by the national government. As a quick measure of this factor, roughly 46 percent of the total land base of the twelve western states (we are not including Hawaii) is federal land (over 60% in some cases), whereas only about 4 percent of the land base of the rest of the nation is federal land. As should be obvious, then, decisions about how the federal estate will be used create an array of issues that are a main feature...

  8. CHAPTER FIVE THE POLITICS OF DAM REMOVAL AND RIVER RESTORATION
    (pp. 89-108)
    Daniel McCool

    Much has been written about the waste and inefficiency of traditional western water projects (Andrews and Sansone 1983; Reisner 1986; Gottlieb 1988; Bates et al. 1993; McCool 1994). Some authors have focused primarily on the negative environmental impacts of supply-centered water development (Fradkin 1981; Palmer 1986; McCully 1996; Grossman 2002). Others have specifically criticized the economic inefficiency of heavily subsidized water projects (Ferejohn 1974; Anderson 1983; Wahl 1989). In addition, innumerable critiques have been written regarding specific projects or river basins. It would not be an exaggeration to say that an entire literature has developed devoted exclusively to criticizing traditional...

  9. CHAPTER SIX WILDLIFE RESOURCE POLICY ISSUES IN THE WEST
    (pp. 109-132)
    William R. Mangun

    Wildlife policy in the West has been shaped by competition for land and scarce water resources. This chapter examines conflicts that have occurred between the needs of wildlife and those of humans who live and work in the western United States. Political conflict and resource competition are addressed through a series of case studies collectively illustrating the consequences of policy responses to resource issues that continue to threaten wildlife populations in the western states.

    Although there appears to be a growing trend toward policy collaboration on public lands (see Conley and Moote 2003; Cook 2000; Weber 1999, 2003), formulation and...

  10. CHAPTER SEVEN THE POLITICS OF HARD-ROCK MINING IN THE AMERICAN WEST
    (pp. 133-154)
    Charles Davis and Sandra Davis

    The symbol of the miner seeking gold or silver has survived for well over a century, the rugged individual replete with hard hat, a pickax, and a mule who dreams of finding mineral wealth through a combination of hard work and luck. The dream remains alive on U.S. federal land because the Mining Law of 1872 continues to offer easy access to mineral-rich land sites in the West and limits government interference in the form of regulations or royalties. The law’s primary goal was to remove legal impediments to the development of mineral resources on federally owned lands in the...

  11. CHAPTER EIGHT SUBURBAN SPRAWL AND SMART GROWTH IN THE WEST
    (pp. 155-172)
    Matt Lindstrom and Hugh Bartling

    The Prosperi family has lived and farmed on nearly 600 acres of land in Madera, California, for the past century, but as the suburbs slowly creep closer to their land, they may be forced out of their home. Between 1998 and 2002 Madera’s population jumped by 50 percent, and permits for single-family homes doubled. These circumstances have pushed the suburbs closer to the Prosperis’ land and made it more difficult for them to grow substantial crops. Not only are the Prosperis losing money because of weak crops, but they also face the possibility of losing close farming friends as well....

  12. CHAPTER NINE WATER POLICY IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES: HISTORICAL AND CONTEXTUAL PERSPECTIVES
    (pp. 173-196)
    Jaina L. Moan and Zachary A. Smith

    Every morning at ten o’clock a spray of water shoots 560 feet above the Sonoran desert. Located in the upscale neighborhood of Fountain Hills, Arizona, the highest-shooting manmade fountain in the world emits 7,000 gallons of water per second and operates for fifteen minutes every hour, seven days a week (Gelt 2004). This occurs in one of the most arid regions in the world, a place that receives an average of 7.66 inches of annual precipitation and where summer temperatures regularly exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit (Smith and Thomassey 2002, 104). Similarly, across the sprawl of the Phoenix metropolitan area, green...

  13. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 197-202)
  14. INDEX
    (pp. 203-212)