Do Not Reisist the Spirit's Call

Do Not Reisist the Spirit's Call

edited and translated by Michael D. Torre
Copyright Date: 2013
Pages: 440
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt4cg8q0
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  • Book Info
    Do Not Reisist the Spirit's Call
    Book Description:

    In this book, Michael D. Torre makes Marín-Sola's articles available in English for the first time. The articles are preceded by an introduction on Marín-Sola and followed by a conclusion that traces the reception of his thought within the Catholic theological community. In Torre's afterword, he defends Marín-Sola's position as substantively the same as that of Aquinas.

    eISBN: 978-0-8132-2150-2
    Subjects: Philosophy

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-v)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vi-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xi-xxxvi)

    Although Francisco Marín-Sola, OP, is known to many through his work on the evolution of doctrine, he no doubt remains a largely unknown figure to all save those who have tracked him down in Spanish sources, some of which are not easily at hand for many. And even these do not give a complete picture of his work, especially insofar as it bears on the concord between the free will of God and man and on sufficient grace. I will thus try to supply this introduction here, in a simple, straight-forward, yet complete way.¹

    Francisco Marín-Sola was born on November...

  5. 1 MARÍN-SOLA’S ARTICLES ON THE DIVINE MOTION
    (pp. 1-226)

    Fourteen years ago, we began in this same periodical a series of articles on “The Homogeneity of Catholic Doctrine.” When the first articles appeared, they created a fair stir among theologians, foreigners as well as Spaniards. Some believed that we extended the evolution of dogma too far; others, on the contrary, believed that we excessively restricted the infallibility of the Church; finally, there did not lack some who thought that we were departing on certain points from the traditional doctrine of the Thomist school.

    Fortunately, as the series of articles proceeded, the fears of our critics were also calmed, and...

  6. 2 CONCLUSION: The Reception of Marín-Sola’s Articles
    (pp. 227-257)

    Just as neither Marín-Sola nor his articles are well enough known, neither is the reception that they have received. We will conclude, then, by trying to make this plain.

    Although Marín-Sola’s great work was not published, its fundamental ideas were.¹ For Jesus Valabuena, OP, and especially Francisco Perez Muñiz, OP, wrote notes for the bilingual edition of the Summa (published by the BAC starting in 1947, under the general direction of Marín-Sola’s friend Santiago Ramirez, OP) that presented his entire position on the matters in question . . . but without ever mentioning his name!² That Muñiz’s notes were in...

  7. 3 AFTERWORD: God’s Salvific Will
    (pp. 258-302)

    As noted in both the Conclusion and Appendix 1, the crucial matter that needs to be understood properly in Marín-Sola’s doctrine is the nature of God’s qualified will (or will secundum quid) and the related idea of his universal salvific will. In this note, I will attempt to make these matters clear, in particular regarding what Thomas himself teaches on them, but also the way the commentators developed his teaching. Finally, I will indicate the way the Church is presently poised to develop this doctrine yet further.

    Before Thomas addresses God’s operations—and thus his intellect and will—he discusses...

  8. Appendix 1 MARÍN-SOLA AND THE THOMISTIC COMMENTATORS
    (pp. 303-333)
  9. Appendix 2 THE SPANISH ADDITIONS TO THE SECOND ARTICLE
    (pp. 334-338)
  10. Appendix 3 SOME TRANSLATIONS FROM THE CONCORDIA TOMISTA
    (pp. 339-374)
  11. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 375-392)
  12. INDEX OF SUBJECTS
    (pp. 393-398)
  13. INDEX OF NAMES
    (pp. 399-404)