ITIL Foundation Essentials

ITIL Foundation Essentials: The exam facts you need

CLAIRE AGUTTER
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 140
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh3s0
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  • Book Info
    ITIL Foundation Essentials
    Book Description:

    ITIL® Foundation Essentials is a distillation of critical information - no waffle or padding - just exactly what you need to understand how to pass the ITIL Foundation exam. Aimed at self-study candidates, ITIL community training delegates, itSMF/BCS members and V2 Foundation Certificate holders, who have yet to take an upgraded exam, this pocket guide is fully aligned with the ITIL 2011 core volumes. Project managers, who are looking to expand their qualifications, and IT contractors or consultants, who don't want to take time out from their day jobs to attend a course, will also find this pocket guide an essential companion to their studies and education.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-400-4
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-5)

    Sometimes, when you’re trying to learn a new subject, there is just so much information available to you that finding the starting point can be too daunting a task in itself.

    The ITIL®¹ service lifecycle is no exception, information is all around us: e-books, traditional paper books, the internet, blogs and opinions provided by friends and colleagues.

    Where do you start?

    Success in the ITIL Foundation certificate relies on the student understanding the concepts, principles and, most importantly, the language of the framework to enable an informed conversation with peers to take place.

    This guide provides you, the student, with...

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 6-6)
  4. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 7-7)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 7-7)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. 8-9)
  7. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 10-10)

    Welcome toITIL Foundation Essentials.This guide distils the key facts that you need to prepare for a successful ITIL Foundation exam.

    This pocket guide is a great revision aid for anyone preparing for their Foundation exam, and is fully aligned with the latest syllabus and ITIL 2011 core volumes....

  8. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING ITIL
    (pp. 11-12)

    ITIL is:

    Best practice for IT service management

    Developed by the UK government

    Globally adopted in the public and private sectors

    Not prescriptive

    A framework that organisations adopt and adapt.

    Best practice is“proven activities or processes that have been successfully used in multiple organisations”. Best practice available in the public domain supports organisational improvement. Sources include public frameworks (ITIL) and standards like ISO/IEC 20000.

    ITIL is successful because it’s:

    Vendor neutral

    Non-prescriptive

    Best practice.

    ITIL is preferable to proprietary information held within organisations, which may not be documented, challenged or improved.

    Figure 1 shows the many sources of service...

  9. CHAPTER 2: SERVICES
    (pp. 13-16)

    For example, a customer using a data centre service does not want to take ownership of the costs of individual hardware elements, or manage risks related to power, etc. The customer wants to pay for, and use, the service.

    IT service:

    Provided by IT service providers

    Made up of IT, people and processes

    Customer-facing IT services directly support the business processes of customer(s), according to SLA targets

    Supporting services are used to deliver customer-facing services.

    Service providers define results-based services focused on customer outcomes.

    Outcome:

    “The result of carrying out an activity, following a process or delivering an IT service....

  10. CHAPTER 3: SERVICE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 17-18)

    Service management can include, for example, the staff skills and processes used to manage and support IT services.

    Organisations develop service management capabilities and skills to respond to challenges including:

    The intangible nature of the output of a service process

    Customer assets that drive demand. Service providers have to balance supply and the cost of delivery

    Service provider and consumer have a high level of contact, often informal and not managed

    Service output is perishable and cannot be stockpiled.

    Service management is supported by knowledge, experience and skills that have built up as the IT industry developed a service focus....

  11. CHAPTER 4: STAKEHOLDERS
    (pp. 19-20)

    Examples of stakeholders are customers, partners, employees, shareholders, owners.

    IT must understand internal and external stakeholders. Internal stakeholders are from the same organisation as the service provider.

    External stakeholders are from a different organisation.

    Stakeholders include:

    Customers: buy goods or services/define what services must do

    Users: use services regularly

    Suppliers: third parties, supply goods or services that form all or part of services.

    Customers divide into two groups:

    Internal customers from the same organisation

    External customers from a different organisation.

    Service providers must meet customers’ expectations.

    There are differences between internal and external customers, including:

    Funding: how the service is...

  12. CHAPTER 5: PROCESSES, FUNCTIONS, ROLES
    (pp. 21-23)

    Processes are closed loop systems that request feedback and use it to improve performance.

    These are used to design and map processes. Processes need to be documented so they can be shared.

    Figure 3 shows the main elements of a process model. This needs to include the inputs and outputs, the resources required, and how the process is measured and managed.

    Respond to triggers

    Deliver a result

    Deliver value to a customer/stakeholder

    Measurable.

    “A team or group of people and the tools or other resources they use to carry out one or more processes or activities.”

    Common IT functions include...

  13. CHAPTER 6: THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE
    (pp. 24-32)

    Five stages documented in five volumes, forming the ITIL core

    Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation and Continual Service Improvement

    Tracks a service from inception to retirement

    Service Strategy is the hub that drives the lifecycle

    CSI looks for improvements in all stages.

    The core is supplemented by complementary guidance, specific to industry sectors, organisation types, operating models and technology architectures.

    What a service provider needs to do to support its customer

    A strategy to support business outcomes

    Plans, patterns, position and perspective for service provider behaviour. Objectives include understanding:

    What strategy is, what services are, who customers...

  14. CHAPTER 7: SERVICE STRATEGY
    (pp. 33-43)

    Customers must understand service value.

    Value is defined by the customer – not the provider

    An affordable mix of features needs to be on offer for the customer to want a service

    Value might not be measured in financial terms alone – the customer might value a service because it fulfils an ethical or moral objective

    Value changes over time.

    The customer must see service value as outweighing service cost. IT needs to articulate what:

    Services it provides

    The services achieve

    The services cost.

    Figure 6 shows the components of value.

    Value is influenced by:

    Outcomes achieved – does the service support the...

  15. CHAPTER 8: SERVICE DESIGN
    (pp. 44-67)

    IT processes, practices and policies need to be designed to make sure that services are high quality, cost effective, and meet customer needs.

    Design makes sure customer expectations are met. Modern IT organisations are pressured to deliver solutions quickly. Good design becomes even more important.

    The 4 Ps need to be considered together for successful service management. Five areas where Service Design has objectives and activities

    Support a holistic design approach.

    Includes the design of the Service Portfolio, used to ensure new or changed services are consistent with and interface with existing services.

    Includes establishing service requirements to support high-level...

  16. CHAPTER 9: SERVICE TRANSITION
    (pp. 68-91)

    This process controls the lifecycle of changes. Service providers need to transition new or changed services into the production environment smoothly.

    Objectives include:

    Responding to changing business requirements while minimising disruption

    Managing and implementing changes to align services with business needs

    Recording and managing changes

    Optimising change-related business risk.

    Scope

    Management of all changes across the service lifecycle, including changes to physical and virtual assets.

    The scope includes changes to the five aspects of Service Design.

    Figure 13 shows the scope of Change Management.

    Sources of change include:

    Service Strategy and Service Portfolio Management for strategic changes

    Service Operation for...

  17. CHAPTER 10: SERVICE OPERATION
    (pp. 92-117)

    Service Operation is often made up of a number of different functions and roles, covering long service hours, including out-of-hours support.

    Service Operation ensures that communication between functional areas and different shifts is managed. Good communication between functions and roles will help Service Operation to maintain service levels and meet business requirements. Service Operation communication includes:

    Handover reports

    Logs

    Timesheets

    Work flows

    Incident updates

    Other reports.

    Service Operation has a lot of contact with users. All communication needs to be checked to make sure it’s appropriate for the audience and useful.

    Good communication can actually prevent or mitigate issues. Organisations...

  18. CHAPTER 11: CONTINUAL SERVICE IMPROVEMENT (CSI)
    (pp. 118-127)

    CSI needs to be co-ordinated and managed, so tasks are not duplicated or missed.

    The CSI approach includes questions that can be asked from a business and IT perspective to identify what to improve and how.

    What is the vision? Identifies long-term goals.

    Where are we now? Gives a snapshot of the organisation.

    Where do we want to be? Provides measurable, prioritised targets.

    How do we get there? Plans improvements.

    Did we get there? Uses measures to track progress.

    How do we keep momentum going? Maintains the focus on improvement.

    Measurement shows where to improve and if improvements have worked....

  19. CHAPTER 12: ROLES
    (pp. 128-131)

    There are a number of generic roles that support a service management organisational structure.

    Accountable for ensuring a process is fit for purpose and performing adequately. A process owner has to be a single person or role, to avoid duplication or confusion.

    Accountabilities include:

    Defining process strategy, policies and standards

    Assisting with process design, including metrics

    Providing resources and ensuring they understand their role

    Making sure the process is documented

    Auditing the process

    Addressing issues or opportunities for improvement.

    Accountable for operational management of a process. There may be more than one manager per process (for example, one change manager...

  20. CHAPTER 13: SERVICE MANAGEMENT AUTOMATION
    (pp. 132-133)

    Automation can improve service asset performance, and service utility and warranty:

    Automated resources can have their capacity adjusted easily

    They don’t need human intervention, so can be available across time zones or service hours

    Automated systems can be measured and improved

    Computers can optimise services and processes in ways that humans could not

    Automation can capture knowledge about a process, and share it more easily.

    Service process automation delivers benefits including:

    Better service quality

    Reduced costs and risks

    Reduced complexity and uncertainty.

    These service management areas benefit from automation:

    Design and modelling

    Service Catalogue

    Pattern recognition and analysis

    Classification, prioritisation...

  21. CHAPTER 14: SERVICE MANAGEMENT SKILLS AND TRAINING
    (pp. 134-134)

    Service management staff need the right skills. They need to understand business priorities and how IT supports them, possess customer service skills and have the ability to innovate.

    Generic service management role requirements could include:

    Management skills

    Meeting management skills

    Communication skills – written and verbal

    Negotiation skills

    Analytical mind-set.

    Standard roles and job titles help to manage roles and responsibilities. Organisations can adopt frameworks like the Skills Framework for the Information Age (www.sfia.org.uk)....

  22. CHAPTER 15: THE ITIL QUALIFICATION SCHEME
    (pp. 135-135)

    The scheme has four levels:

    Foundation – mandatory, two credits

    Intermediate – based on Lifecycle and Capability streams, then the mandatory Managing Across the Lifecycle

    Expert – granted once candidates achieves 22 credits

    Master.

    Read more atwww.itil-officialsite.com....

  23. CHAPTER 16: THE FOUNDATION EXAM
    (pp. 136-136)

    40 multiple-choice questions

    60 minutes

    65% or 26/40 to pass

    No trick questions

    Closed book.

    You can download the Foundation Syllabus and a free sample exam from the ITIL Official Site:www.itil-officialsite.com.

    A full ITIL glossary of terms is also available in multiple languages from the site....

  24. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 137-140)