Practical IT Service Management

Practical IT Service Management: A Concise Guide for Busy Executives

Thejendra BS
Copyright Date: 2008
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 249
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh429
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  • Book Info
    Practical IT Service Management
    Book Description:

    This book shows you how to set up a technical service management structure, using the best practice framework established by the IT Infrastructure Library. The ITIL system is the most widely accepted approach to technical IT service management worldwide. It teaches technical support staff how to provide the efficient IT services that are vital to your company’s success.

    eISBN: 978-1-905356-40-9
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Preface
    (pp. 5-6)
    Thejendra BS
  3. About the Author
    (pp. 7-8)
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. 9-10)
  5. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 11-22)

    The advancement and easy availability of new and useful technologies today have enabled thousands of organisations worldwide to implement and become heavily dependent on technology for running their businesses. Today, it is not possible to run any organisation, small or big, without the use of some computer- or telecom-related technology. With so much proliferation of hardware, software and networking equipment, it is necessary to have specialised and dedicated technology support departments to look after them. Today, a professional technology support department is as essential to any organisation as a qualified finance department or senior management. Though organisations are free to...

  6. CHAPTER 2: ITIL SERVICE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
    (pp. 23-54)

    This book explains IT service management based on the principles of ITIL and shows how you can implement or interpret them in a practical manner. It covers the essential processes of both ITIL Version 2 and ITIL Version 3. As an IT manager involved in practical technical aspects, this chapter may seem like a collection of dull processes raising doubts on how you can use actually use them in the real world. But as you read through this book, you will soon realise that ITIL actually contains a lot of technical and practical IT service management common sense rather than...

  7. CHAPTER 3: SERVICE DESK FUNCTION
    (pp. 55-71)

    This is a function under the service operation phase of the ITSM core life cycle. A service desk is a single point of contact for your business mangers and end-users to reach the IT department for resolving all their IT issues or technical troubles. This is where all questions, issues and requests are logged, recorded and followed prior to closure. A service desk is a functional unit consisting of a number of dedicated staff responsible for dealing with service events usually made via telephone, e-mail, the web and so on. The type of service desk you need depends on the...

  8. CHAPTER 4: INCIDENT MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 72-81)

    An incident is any event that causes, or may cause, an interruption to the quality of an agreed IT service. For example, a power supply failure in a user’s computer, a user logon ID locking up, a user not being able to access a web server or an e-mail system are all classified as incidents. The exact definition of an incident is:

    An unplanned interruption to an IT service or a reduction in the quality of an IT service. Failure of a configuration item that has not yet impacted service is also an incident. For example, failure of one disk...

  9. CHAPTER 5: PROBLEM MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 82-88)

    A problem is an incident or multiple incidents for which the root cause is not known. Problems can sometimes be discovered because of multiple incidents exhibiting similar systems, e.g. a computer not booting-up occasionally is an incident but the same computer (or all similar models) not booting-up every Monday morning is a problem that needs further investigation. Until a solution is found, those end-users will face the same issues week after week. Also, an incident cannot be classified as a problem, e.g. if the mouse of the CEO’s computer is not working, it is still an incident and will not...

  10. CHAPTER 6: CHANGE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 89-98)

    Today, technology and related business models are transforming at an alarming rate. Organisations have to adopt the latest technologies and processes rapidly to be competitive and innovative. In IT, changes usually mean implementing new hardware, software, network equipment, a tool, an upgrade, etc. In ITIL, a change is any addition, deletion, modification, etc. that affects IT. For example, upgrading a payroll software version on an important finance server is a change. However, change should not be implemented just for the sake of speed, or in a haphazard manner. An orderly and careful process is required for implementing change based on...

  11. CHAPTER 7: RELEASE AND DEPLOYMENT MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 99-110)

    A release is an authorised and tested change to the IT infrastructure or service. For example, a set of new files that upgrades an antivirus program from Version 1 to Version 2 can be called a release. A techie may view this as a bunch of files to be copied from a floppy into a production file server, but, from the ITIL perspective, it is a release because the change management team has approved copying of the files to the specified file server.

    The exact definition of a release is:

    A collection of hardware, software, documentation, processes or other components...

  12. CHAPTER 8: SERVICE ASSET AND CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 111-126)

    An asset is any resource or capability. Assets of a service provider include anything that could contribute to the delivery of a service. Assets can be one of the following types: management, organisation, process, knowledge, people, information, applications, infrastructure or financial capital. Resources include IT infrastructure, people, budgets and other things that help in delivering an IT service. Capabilities may develop over the years. Service providers must develop distinctive capabilities that can keep the competition at bay. For capabilities to increase, IT departments must continuously train and upgrade themselves to be competitive. In this book we will be mainly concentrating...

  13. CHAPTER 9: SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 127-139)

    Service level management (SLM) is the process of defining, agreeing, documenting and managing the effective IT service that is expected by the business. SLM covers service level agreements (SLAs), operational level agreements (OLAs), underpinning contracts (UCs) and related activities such as periodic reviews, updating, deletions, etc., as well as publishing and making them known to all concerned. The main aim of SLM is to ensure an acceptable quality of the IT services provided, at a cost acceptable to the business, and indirectly to the final external customer. SLM is part of the service design phase of the ITSM core life...

  14. CHAPTER 10: SERVICE CATALOGUE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 140-148)

    A general dictionary defines a catalogue as ‘a list of titles, course offerings or articles for exhibition or sale, usually including descriptive information or illustrations’. In ITIL language, a service catalogue is a database or a structured document containing information about IT services available to current and prospective customers. The catalogue also contains information about deliverables, prices, contact details, procedures and request processes. By having a service catalogue, organisations can ensure all areas of the business can view an accurate, consistent picture of the IT services, their details, status and the quality of service the customer can expect from each...

  15. CHAPTER 11: CAPACITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 149-159)

    A dictionary defines ‘capacity’ in two ways: the maximum or optimum amount that can be produced; or the ability to hold. Capacity management is part of the service design phase of the ITSM core life cycle that handles IT capacity for current and future business requirements. It ensures that the required capacity exists in the IT infrastructure to handle growing business demands. For example, the IT capacity team will determine the amount of disk space and processing power required if the company has to buy a new file server for storing huge engineering drawing files. Or it may recommend the...

  16. CHAPTER 12: DEMAND MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 160-165)

    A general dictionary defines demand in several ways. The one that applies to IT is any urgent or pressing requirement for one or more specific IT services. The requirement can be for a new service or an upgrade to an existing service that is currently performing inadequately.

    The exact definition of demand management is:

    Activities that understand and influence customer demand for services and the provision of capacity to meet these demands.

    Demand management is a sub-process of service strategy. Demand management is still interconnected with capacity management, but can be viewed as one step higher, in the way that...

  17. CHAPTER 13: AVAILABILITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 166-173)

    A general dictionary defines availability as something that is ready for use or accessible when required. In ITIL, availability refers to the accessibility of the various infrastructure and services provided by IT services during the stated time periods.

    The exact definition of availability is:

    Ability of a configuration item or IT service to perform its agreed function when required. Availability is determined by reliability, maintainability, serviceability, performance, and security. Availability is usually calculated as a percentage. This calculation is often based on agreed service time and down time. It is best practice to calculate availability using measurements of the business...

  18. CHAPTER 14: INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 174-181)

    Organisations rely on several types of data for their business, and can suffer from various disasters if critical information and data are compromised by any means. Some of the information contained in them can be confidential and must not be viewed or altered by unauthorised persons. For example, the salary details of all your employees cannot be made public for everyone to know or view. Or your company payment website can be breached and defaced by hackers, causing a loss of reputation and other disasters. Hence, it is necessary to have a protective envelope around the various kinds of data...

  19. CHAPTER 15: ACCESS MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 182-186)

    An organisation can have several computers, network equipment, servers, databases, etc. required for its business. Naturally, all equipment cannot and should not be accessible to every user or department. For example, the important designs stored in a folder on an engineering server should be accessible only to the engineering staff and not to every employee in the office. So IT departments must ensure access is provided only to authorised persons for the equipment or data, and prevent unauthorised persons from viewing or modifying them. An access management department’s job is to enforce all the previously designed and published information security...

  20. CHAPTER 16: IT SERVICE CONTINUITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 187-202)

    IT service continuity management (SCM) is part of the service design phase of the ITSM core life cycle. Service continuity management deals with managing risks to ensure that an organisation’s IT infrastructure can continue to provide some minimum services even in the event of a scenario like a major IT disaster. For example, if the entire data centre that houses all the important servers gets damaged because of a fire, electrical short circuit or some other sudden disaster, how will your company recover? How can you ensure that it is prepared to handle such disasters? SCM prepares your organisation for...

  21. CHAPTER 17: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 203-210)

    Financial management is the process of budgeting, accounting and charging for IT services. The objective of the IT financial management process is the proper management of monetary resources to support the organisation’s IT goals. Financial management ensures that any solution proposed by IT services to meet the requirements defined in service level management is justified from a cost and budget standpoint. Financial data provides the costs associated with the business to make decisions regarding changes in the IT infrastructure, systems, staffing or processes. For example, if the business wants to add 100 more employees to the organisation, then IT financial...

  22. CHAPTER 18: SUPPLIER MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 211-222)

    A supplier is a third-party organisation or individual responsible for supplying goods and services. Examples are hardware and software vendors, networking and telecom suppliers, outsourcing companies, consultants, etc. Today no organisation can do its business or use IT without depending on one or more suppliers. And suppliers have become important and critical business partners in most organisations worldwide.

    The main reasons why suppliers are necessary are as follows (the terms vendor and supplier are used interchangeably throughout this book):

    Today organisations have become highly dependant on IT equipment such as computers, laptops, servers, telecoms, networking and so on. In many...

  23. CHAPTER 19: IT OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT FUNCTION
    (pp. 223-225)

    This is a new function in ITIL Version 3 and one of the three primary ITIL functions defined in the service operation phase of the ITSM core life cycle. This function focuses on the day-to-day, maintenance activities required to operate and support IT services. These operational actions involve executing repeatable, standardised procedures. They may also take assistance from other divisions and external vendors if required.

    The exact definition of IT operations management is:

    The function within an IT service provider which performs the daily activities needed to manage IT services and the supporting IT infrastructure. IT operations management includes IT...

  24. CHAPTER 20: GENERAL TIPS AND ADVICE FOR IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 226-235)

    Running and managing an IT department is not easy. It has its share of joys and troubles and is highly exciting and also very stressful. You can have sleepless nights as you rush to your office in your pyjamas to revive a dead server. Many technical professionals and newcomers get pushed into managing an IT department without enough training or experience without a clear idea of what is expected of them. Often the workload can be so high that you will not have time to scratch yourself if you itch. The troubles you can face can range from a constant...

  25. APPENDIX 1: SAMPLE SLA BETWEEN IT SERVICES AND ROCKSOLID BUSINESS MANAGERS
    (pp. 236-242)
  26. APPENDIX 2: SAMPLE OLA BETWEEN IT DEPARTMENT AND THE ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT
    (pp. 243-243)
  27. APPENDIX 3: SAMPLE UC BETWEEN ROCKSOLID IT SERVICES AND ABC COMPUTER CORP
    (pp. 244-245)
  28. APPENDIX 4: A SIMPLE IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT FLOW WITH INTERACTIONS AMONG DIFFERENT PROCESSES
    (pp. 246-247)
  29. APPENDIX 5: THE ITIL GLOSSARY
    (pp. 248-248)
  30. APPENDIX 6: ITSM BOOKS AND OTHER RESOURCES
    (pp. 249-249)