Ten Steps to ITSM Success

Ten Steps to ITSM Success: A Practitioner’s Guide to Enterprise IT Transformation

ANGELO ESPOSITO
TIMOTHY ROGERS
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 255
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh43s
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  • Book Info
    Ten Steps to ITSM Success
    Book Description:

    This book provides guidance on implementing ITSM Best Practices in an organization based on the authors’ real-world experiences. Advice is delivered through a Ten-Step approach, with each step building upon the successes of its predecessors. Ten Steps to ITSM Success helps IT to prepare for this role by providing a detailed and practical guide to implementing ITSM best practices. It is aimed at ITSM practitioners and consultants, but will also be of interest to IT Directors and C-suite executives looking to transform the role of IT into a value-creating business partner, to establish a service management culture, and to drive improvements in their respective organizations. This book is a co-publication with itSMF USA and is the second book in the Thought Leadership Series

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-457-8
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-7)
    Suzanne D. Van Hove and Eugene Smith

    Every Service Management “adapt and adopt” initiative teaches some very hard lessons. Those who have read the books (or passed an ITIL®Foundation course) and think, “Ah! This will be easy!” soon learn the books are references and the need to read the “whitespace” is imperative. The “how to” is often hidden in the guidance, if only due to the endless variables any organizationʹs culture presents. Finding a Service Manager with quality experience gained from success and failure is invaluable to any service improvement initiative. With todayʹs limited or reducing budgets and an economy that demands fiscal responsibility, there is...

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 8-9)
  4. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. 10-10)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 11-11)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. 12-14)
  7. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 15-20)

    Youʹre probably asking yourself, “Why another book on ITSM?” The question is legitimate. A cursory glance at the IT Governance bookshelf will reveal a wealth of material on ITSM and its accompanying framework, ITIL®.

    We undertook the challenge of writing this book because, while there is a plethora of material about the underlying mechanics of ITSM, we found very little advice on how to implement ITSM best practices to achieve an organizationʹs business objectives.

    The official ITIL®volumes do an excellent job of explaining what service management is, how the various processes should work and fit together, and why IT...

  8. CHAPTER 1: SETTING THE STAGE
    (pp. 21-32)

    The curtain rising on the opening night of a Broadway production is, perversely, the final step in the process of actually producing and presenting the performance. Prior to that opening night, the producers, directors, actors, stage hands, carpenters, lighting technicians, and dozens of others worked long hours to ensure that all items were taken care of, and that no detail was overlooked. Each person – regardless of whether it was the director, producer, or playwright – broke the action down into its component parts, examined them, tweaked them, reworked them, and then repeated the process all over again until they...

  9. CHAPTER 2: INVENTORY THE CURRENT SERVICE OFFERING
    (pp. 33-43)

    Via your business plan, youʹve earned the mandate to consolidate and streamline IT services across the board. Moreover, repositioning IT from cost center to value center opens the door to developing new, value-creating services – provided the ROI justifies it.

    It is now time to take the first active step in your ITSM transformation journey. This may seem like a daunting challenge, and it is. The last thing you can afford is to stumble out of the gate. Step Two provides guidance on where to start and how to achieve that first critical “quick win.”

    With the new service model,...

  10. CHAPTER 3: VALIDATE THE CURRENT SERVICE MODEL
    (pp. 44-57)

    In terms of the ITSM Lifecycle, as defined by ITIL®, the first three steps in our approach fall under the Service Strategy phase. The Boardʹs articulation of its five-year plan has defined the market it wants to enter, and has set broad objectives for its management team to achieve. The business plan has refined that broad objective by drilling down to a level where the firm can quantify how current dollars are allocated and spent, allowing us the ability to conduct a true cost-benefit analysis.

    Validating the current service model – deciding what is to be retained, what is to...

  11. CHAPTER 4: ESTABLISH AN ITSM STEERING COMMITTEE
    (pp. 58-68)

    In our experience, Step Four – the founding of an ITSM Steering Committee, authorized to oversee the design and implementation of the service management model – is the single most critical component of this entire process. Composed (as it should be) of business unit leaders, IT representatives, and subject matter experts, this body will be responsible for dealing with service and process design issues, and for adjudicating and rendering decisions that must be reached, compromises that must be negotiated, and risks that must be mitigated. Used effectively, the members of this board will facilitate and enforce standardized service and process...

  12. CHAPTER 5: DEFINE THE IDEAL TARGET STATE
    (pp. 69-86)

    When designing a new building, the architect assesses a myriad of factors: the land on which the building will be erected; its planned use when completed (i.e. residential, commercial, or a combination of both); the components required to erect the structure; local regulations and building codes; environmental concerns; future use; and so on. There are a host of activities and tasks that must be considered before the first shovel overturns the first clump of earth. So must it be with defining the organizationʹs ideal target state. We have said it before, but it bears repeating: donʹt make the mistake of...

  13. CHAPTER 6: CREATE THE IT STRATEGIC AND TACTICAL PLANS
    (pp. 87-110)

    Now that the ideal target state has been defined, itʹs time to roll up the sleeves and get down to brass tacks. Step Six is two-fold, and is, arguably, the most difficult step in this entire process. The two primary activities that have to be completed in this step are: agreeing on which of the rank-ordered requirements can be accommodated given the organizationʹs constraints in time, money, and resources; and then creating (or updating) the IT strategic and tactical plans to support those priorities.

    The Free Dictionary defines negotiation as “confer[ing] with another or others in order to come to...

  14. CHAPTER 7: DEFINE ORGANIZATIONAL ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
    (pp. 111-127)

    Prior to commencing with Step Seven, letʹs review what has been produced through the first six stages of the Ten-Step approach.

    In hand, we have the following deliverables:

    1. A completed and approved Business Plan.

    2. Initial funding to cover preliminary activities.

    3. A comprehensive current-state assessment, including service costs and resource allocations.

    4. A defined service portfolio, including identification of key gaps and prioritized future investments.

    5. An established governing body, tasked with overseeing and guiding the ITSM Transformation.

    6. An approved, agreed-upon ideal target state.

    7. A rank-ordered list of prioritized capabilities.

    8. An IT strategic plan aligned with business initiatives.

    9. An ITSM Program Management plan...

  15. CHAPTER 8: STANDARDIZED DEVELOPMENT APPROACH
    (pp. 128-151)

    For those readers who have journeyed with us through the previous Seven Steps, we offer hearty congratulations! You should be proud of what you have accomplished thus far! We also recognize that some readers reside in organizations where the foundational building blocks have already been erected; so whether you skimmed through Steps One to Seven as a refresher, or skipped straight to Step Eight, we welcome you to this decisive point in the Transformation journey.

    Regardless of how you got here, there isgood newsto be had. In many ways, the biggest obstacles (and risks) to ITSM success are...

  16. CHAPTER 9: STRATEGY AND PLANNING
    (pp. 152-155)

    The PDLC in our Ten-Step approach has seven phases, not including continual improvement:

    1. Strategy

    2. Planning

    3. Logical Design

    4. Physical Design

    5. Build and Test

    6. Deployment

    7. Operation & Sustainment.

    Letʹs take a moment to briefly explore each phase.

    The theme of assessing and aligning strategy is carried forward in the PDLC. Although the project has already been defined, the stakeholders identified and engaged, and Process Owners assigned, there are still other aspects to consider.

    At this point, the rank-ordered list of capabilities has been agreed upon by all stakeholders. While items in the list probably wonʹt shift up or down based on criticality and...

  17. CHAPTER 10: LOGICAL AND PHYSICAL DESIGN
    (pp. 156-162)

    In our considered opinion, logical design is more vital to the health and well-being of the business than is physical design. Bryceʹs Law16states, “Whereas logical information resources will remain relatively static, the physical resources will change dynamically.”

    If you give the matter some thought, you will see this makes sense. The logical underpinnings of your organization – its business and data components – will very rarely change. This is because those logical components are inherent in the nature of oneʹs business. Unless the model itself changes (via a merger, acquisition, divesture, etc.) those two logical componentsshouldremain relatively...

  18. CHAPTER 11: BUILD AND TEST
    (pp. 163-170)

    The Build and Test phase of the PDLC is where the rubber meets the road. Developers love this phase of the PDLC because it offers them the opportunity to use new or updated tools and software widgets. It allows them to spread their creative wings while satisfying end-user requirements. Business users whoʹve been loaned out to your improvement initiative enjoy this phase because they finally get the chance to test out the prototypes the developers design and create. In short, in the Build and Test phase of the PDLC, the time has come to actually create the capabilities for which...

  19. CHAPTER 12: CONDUCT SERVICE AND PROCESS HEALTH ASSESSMENT
    (pp. 171-185)

    Now that the required capabilities have been agreed upon, prioritized, developed and tested, itʹs time to begin the process of migrating them into the production environment. As we prepare to do so, we move out of Service Design and into Service Transition.

    This phase of the Lifecycle is – in our collective opinion – the most fraught with peril, and presents the greatest overall risk to success. We have witnessed countless incidents where “thereʹs many a slip ‘twixt the cup and the lip.”17At this key juncture in your project, you want to maximize your chances of success, while minimizing...

  20. CHAPTER 13: ANALYSIS AND DEPLOYMENT
    (pp. 186-193)

    Of course, after the Service and Process Health Assessment has been conducted and the results consolidated, the project team can focus its attention on remediating identified deficiencies, prior to proceeding with implementation activities.

    As can be seen, the Service and Process Health Assessment is yet another tool the practitioner can employ to ensure a smooth and seamless improvement initiative.

    Some of the categories covered by the Service and Process Health Assessment are addressed during the Service Strategy phase of the lifecycle (e.g.Process Goals and Objectives). Other categories are addressed during Service Design (e.g.Policies, Plans, and Procedures).Operational Solutions...

  21. CHAPTER 14: OPERATION AND SUSTAINMENT
    (pp. 194-195)

    Congratulations! The deployment has gone as planned, and your new service initiative is now in production. However, this doesnʹt mean that your job is finished. Even though Service Operationʹs function is to coordinate and carry out the activities and processes required to deliver and manage services, the staff responsible for those activities shouldnʹt be expected to pick them up, unassisted, on day one.

    Part of the improvement initiativeʹs responsibilities is to work alongside the operations staff to ensure that the new capabilities are performing as designed and developed. This is especially true in those first few weeks after installation. It...

  22. CHAPTER 15: BALANCED SCORECARD AND CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT
    (pp. 196-231)

    Transformation20is defined as “change in form, appearance, nature or character.”

    Welcome to Step Ten – the final stage in your ITSM Transformation journey. If you have traveled with us through the previous Nine Steps, then your organization has indeed beentransformed– it is not the same organization it used to be. Letʹs review the major changes that have taken place with our fictional insurance company:

    IT strategy aligned with Business strategy via linked goals and objectives.

    IT delivering cost-justified services the Business needs in order to scale and grow.

    Capabilities, services and processes chartered and governed by a...

  23. CHAPTER 16: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER
    (pp. 232-242)

    As we stated at the bookʹs outset, our Ten-Step approach is not intended to be the prescriptive end-all and be-all of IT Service Management Improvement Initiatives. Rather, it is a series of simple, yet focused, steps that we have found useful to follow over the course of our respective careers.

    In our collective opinion, this is a fascinating time to be an ITSM Practitioner or Decision Maker. After a period of stagnation, we believe industry – across the board – is poised to begin a new phase of innovation and creativity. In order to do so, they will – out...

  24. APPENDIX A: BUSINESS PLAN TEMPLATE
    (pp. 243-250)
  25. REFERENCES
    (pp. 251-251)
  26. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 252-255)