Managing Business Transformation

Managing Business Transformation: A Practical Guide

MELANIE FRANKLIN
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 156
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh50s
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  • Book Info
    Managing Business Transformation
    Book Description:

    In Managing Business Transformation: A Practical Guide, Melanie Franklin will guide you through all the stages of change management. Using real-life examples, up-to-date information and clear diagrams, this practical handbook will equip you to be an agent of change, whatever your role. This book will enable you to: Understand change - how to define clear goals and quantify the benefits, Plan and prepare for change - how to create a change plan, communicate it and manage the impact of change, Implement change - how to build an effective change team and obtain the buy-in of your staff, Embed the change - how to return to the new 'business as usual'.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-306-9
    Subjects: Management & Organizational Behavior

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 7-7)
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. 8-9)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 10-12)

    This book is for people who are looking for a structured approach to managing change. There is no universally recognised definition of change management, but contributors to this book variously describe it as:

    engagement of individuals and the organisation to enable a smooth transition to a desirable and sustainable changed state;

    all the management activities to successfully move from the current state to the desired future state. These activities include: the definition of the objective, the facilitation of the impacts and the embedding of the change;

    understanding and defining the scope of change required. It includes the planning and successful...

  6. CHAPTER 1: UNDERSTANDING THE CHANGE
    (pp. 13-38)

    The purpose of this phase is to clarify the reasons for the change and to use this to motivate and persuade all affected that the change is beneficial.

    Transformational change comes from the desire of the organisation to achieve its strategic objectives. The scope of the change requires an understanding of the capability needed by the organisation to achieve these objectives, and this scope directly impacts the viability of the change as evidenced by the business case. The process of understanding the need for change is, naturally, at the start of the business change life cycle. However, it is useful...

  7. CHAPTER 2: PLANNING AND PREPARING FOR CHANGE
    (pp. 39-72)

    Two possible techniques for brainstorming the potential change activities are:

    breakdown structure

    Mind Mapping®.

    A breakdown structure diagram is used to identify the core achievements of the change. These core achievements are then broken down into more specific achievements, adding more detail as you move through each layer of the diagram, until there is a clear picture of the total change. Once the achievements (milestones) have been defined, the order and priority associated with the milestones can be plotted via a flow diagram.

    A Mind Map is a diagram that consists of a central core (in this case the change...

  8. CHAPTER 3: IMPLEMENTING THE CHANGE
    (pp. 73-111)

    The purpose of the change team is to implement the change, ensuring that the change gains maximum acceptance. The change team is formed once the change has been authorised by those senior managers responsible for the strategic direction of the organisation, so it is not responsible for deciding on the scope and validity of the change. This change team is distinct from the project team, who are responsible for the creation of deliverables used as a basis for the change.

    Although everyone experiences change differently, there are advantages to bringing individuals together to work through the change as a team:...

  9. CHAPTER 4: EMBEDDING THE CHANGE
    (pp. 112-127)

    Embedding evolves from implementation of the change and is the point when the change has become ‘normal’. It is not yet delivering all of the increases in performance or efficiency envisioned, but there are positive outcomes that can be used to promote continuing effort in making the change become ‘business as usual’.

    The duration of the embedding phase is hard to predict because it is dependent on the engagement and support of those implementing the change. In successful change initiatives, embedding feels like the tail end of implementing, with just a few tidying-up tasks to complete.

    In complex change, embedding...

  10. CHAPTER 5: ALIGNING PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 128-149)

    Many project professionals would argue that managing the transition from the current state to a new way of working is within the scope of the project life cycle. Practically, this does not happen, with the activities and effort required to manage the change brought about by the project passed to the users at project closure. This is because:

    It is not cost effective for project teams to remain in place once development and testing of the deliverables has been completed. Change activities can benefit from the knowledge of the project team, but individuals cannot outsource implementation and embedding, they have...

  11. CONCLUSION
    (pp. 150-150)

    Numerous studies analysing why some organisations perform better than others have identified change management as a significant contributor to success. Increasingly, we are judged on our ability to adapt to changes initiated by others and to create innovations of our own. We are expected to intuitively understand how change happens because we are a part of change all of the time. However, participating in change may only involve a willingness to be swept along by the knowledge and enthusiasm of others. Leading change requires an ability to analyse and plan the change along with a willingness to address the psychological...

  12. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 151-153)
  13. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 154-156)