Service Level Agreements

Service Level Agreements: A legal and practical guide

JIMMY DESAI
Copyright Date: 2010
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 117
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh5f2
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  • Book Info
    Service Level Agreements
    Book Description:

    Service Level Management - a Practitioner's Guide, Second Edition offers a practical, experience-based approach to the subject matter. This guide shows you the best way to design a service level management (SLM) roadmap and implementation project plan, compile a service catalogue, put together service level agreements, and much more.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-070-9
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-6)

    This pocket guide has been written with the following readers in mind, although others should also find the information useful:

    Chief executive officers

    Managing directors

    Finance directors

    Strategic directors

    Senior management teams

    IT and outsourcing lawyers (both in private practice and in house)

    Chief information officers and IT directors

    IT procurement professionals

    Service level and contract managers

    IT and process consultants

    IT managers

    Technical service managers

    Service delivery managers

    Client service relationship managers

    Help desk analysts

    Network support engineers

    IT sales professionals.

    A wide range of industry sectors will outsource service provision (for example, banking, Pharmaceuticals, travel and insurance companies)....

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 7-7)
  4. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 8-8)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 9-9)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. 10-11)
  7. CHAPTER 1: WHY DO YOU NEED A SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENT?
    (pp. 12-37)

    It is true to say that many organisations look at outsourcing (including IT outsourcing) to cut costs. Some organisations look to outsource for other reasons, such as streamlining their businesses, or re-organising the way that they do business. Although organisations are often interested in cutting costs via outsourcing, they do not want this to mean that the standard of service falls. In fact, many organisations want to obtain the best of both worlds, by cutting costs via outsourcing, but also obtaining better services than they received previously.

    References in this pocket guide to ‘you’ , ‘your’ and ‘your organisation’, are...

  8. CHAPTER 2: WHERE SLAs GO WRONG
    (pp. 38-48)

    Under general law², if services are to be provided to an organisation by a supplier, they must be provided with ‘reasonable skill and care’, and goods provided must be of ‘satisfactory quality’.

    In terms of ‘reasonable skill and care’, this could be described as the standard of skill and care that would normally be expected of someone in that particular field.

    ‘Satisfactory quality’ means that the goods should meet the standard a reasonable person would regard as satisfactory, taking into account the description of the goods, the price (if relevant) and all other relevant circumstances. The quality of the goods...

  9. CHAPTER 3: BUILDING THE FOUNDATION FOR THE SLA
    (pp. 49-74)

    It is often the case that SLAs are only thought about by organisations either once they start to talk to potential suppliers, or, alternatively, towards the end of negotiating the framework agreement, when time is short and a deal needs to be signed imminently. However, rushing the preparation and thought behind the SLA can lead to problems later on.

    In this chapter, we look at what elements you should be considering, well before even engaging with potential suppliers.

    Your organisation should consider what it would require regarding services, and the standard of services to be provided. Going through such a...

  10. CHAPTER 4: DRAFTING THE SLA AND KEY CLAUSES
    (pp. 75-94)

    This chapter covers the issues to consider when drafting an SLA.

    Drafting the SLA will typically involve:

    Obtaining a template for an SLA from your organisation’s specialist outsourcing lawyers.

    Working on that SLA to tailor it to your requirements by adding in the information from the previous chapters.

    Adding bespoke provisions which suit the particular needs of your organisation.

    Tying in the SLA to the framework agreement, YET ensuring the SLA can operate as a standalone working document (rather than IT managers having always to refer back to the IT outsourcing agreement which may well be voluminous).

    Understanding that the...

  11. CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE SUPPLIER
    (pp. 95-98)

    Many organisations think that the SLA should simply list the service levels, the acceptable service level targets, and provide sufficient compensation. However, there is much more to SLAs than this. SLAs also relate to people and the behaviours that the supplier might adopt, rather than being legal documents alone.

    SLAs can have the power to:

    Be a deterrent against the supplier providing a poor service.

    Be an incentive for the supplier to provide a better service, or an excellent service.

    Guide the supplier into focusing its time, effort and resources into what the customer believes is really important (rather than...

  12. CHAPTER 6: NEGOTIATING THE SLA
    (pp. 99-106)

    One of the key dangers when negotiating the SLA is that it is treated and dealt with in exactly the same way, in terms of negotiations, as the framework agreement. Often the SLA is drafted by, and then tabled by, one party to the other party.

    This first draft of the SLA then often goes through various drafts and revisions before the final SLA, and its wording, is agreed by the parties.

    The framework agreement is often heavily negotiated, with a lot of time being spent by lawyers, accountants, consultants, and the senior management teams of both parties, to come...

  13. CHAPTER 7: PUTTING THE SLA INTO ACTION
    (pp. 107-114)

    The framework agreement will last for a number of years, and so it is inevitable that the services required may need to change.

    Some organisations may be reluctant to raise the need for changes with the supplier because they may believe that this might be seen by the supplier as an opportunity to revisit and review prices (upwards). However, your organisation may be unable to avoid these discussions with the supplier if changes are essential. Ideally, you will have considered and incorporated many of the anticipated changes into your SLA, so that if these changes do happen, then they can...

  14. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 115-117)