ISO14001 Step by Step

ISO14001 Step by Step: A practical guide

NAEEM SADIQ
ASIF HAYAT KHAN
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 104
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh5k0
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  • Book Info
    ISO14001 Step by Step
    Book Description:

    In the 21st century, business has to take sustainability seriously. As public opinion becomes increasingly concerned about climate change, governments are imposing ever tighter environmental regulations on both industry and the retail sector. By putting in place an environmental management system (EMS), you can ensure you are disposing of your waste in a responsible manner and making the most efficient use of raw materials. This will help you to lower carbon emissions and keep the negative impact of your business on the environment to a minimum.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-103-4
    Subjects: Technology, Business

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-5)

    Individuals, organisations and communities across the globe have become increasingly concerned with issues of quality and sustainability of our environment. There is also a growing demand on organisations to demonstrate environmentally responsible behaviour through eco-friendly products, processes and practices.

    This book is for all those who wish to develop and implement an effective ISO14001-based environment management system (EMS). International standards, such as ISO14001, often carry a formality about them with each word bearing a specific meaning and context. They define requirements on ‘what’ ought to be done, without prescribing any specific details on ‘how’ it might be achieved. There is,...

  3. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. 6-6)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 7-7)
  5. DISCLAIMER
    (pp. 8-8)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. 9-10)
  7. CHAPTER 1: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, OBJECTIVES AND PROGRAMMES (CLAUSES 4.2 & 4.3.3)
    (pp. 11-18)

    An environmental policy is a statement of an organisation’s top management commitment, which defines the direction and intentions of the organisation with regard to its environmental performance. The policy must be consistent with the nature, scale and environmental impacts of the organisation’s activities, products and services – and must be approved by the top management.

    The following diagram provides an overview of what an environmental management system (EMS) policy statement must contain:

    The following points define what an organisation is required to do in order to meet the requirements of the standard:

    Top management must document and approve an environmental policy...

  8. CHAPTER 2: IDENTIFYING ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS AND DETERMINING SIGNIFICANT IMPACTS (CLAUSE 4.3.1)
    (pp. 19-22)

    Establish and implement procedure(s) to:

    identify environmental aspects of all activities, products and services that are performed within the defined scope of the organisation

    determine those that have or can have significant impacts on the environment

    establish an EMS which must be based on consideration of the significant environmental aspects.

    Environment: because of its products, processes and activities, an organisation constantly interacts with its surroundings. These interactions could relate to water, air, land, natural resources or even flora, fauna, aquatic life or community. The complete set of surroundings in which an organisation operates may be considered its environment.

    Environmental aspect:...

  9. CHAPTER 3: REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION OF COMPLIANCE (CLAUSES 4.3.2 & 4.5.2)
    (pp. 23-27)

    Establish and implement a system that:

    defines the process of identification and access to applicable legal and other requirements to which the organisation subscribes (relating to its environmental aspects)

    determines the extent of applicability of these requirements

    considers these requirements while establishing and implementing the environmental system

    periodically verifies the organisation’s continued compliance to these requirements.

    The first step in managing compliance with environmental legal requirements is to know which requirements are applicable to the environmental aspects of an organisation’s activities, products and services.

    Each country has its own environmental laws and regulatory bodies. The three environmental regulators in the...

  10. CHAPTER 4: RESOURCES, ROLES, RESPONSIBILITY, AUTHORITY AND COMMUNICATION (CLAUSE 4.4.1 & 4.4.3)
    (pp. 28-31)

    Provide resources required to establish, implement, maintain and improve the EMS.

    Define roles and responsibilities and appoint specific management representative(s) for EMS.

    Establish procedure(s) that define processes for internal as well as external communication.

    An EMS system can neither be implemented nor improved, unless the required human, financial, material, specialised skills and organisational resources are provided by the management. This may be done in the following manner:

    The senior management defines the organisation’s structure, and the roles, responsibilities and authorities of all those who are required to perform any task relating to EMS. These could be tasks relating to identifying...

  11. CHAPTER 5: COMPETENCE, TRAINING AND AWARENESS (CLAUSE 4.4.2)
    (pp. 32-34)

    People performing tasks that relate to potentially significant environmental impacts must be competent to perform those tasks.

    Identify and provide training associated with EMS as well as environmental aspects.

    Establish procedure(s) to provide awareness relating to significant aspects, EMS policy, objectives and procedures, including the potential consequences of not complying with these procedures.

    This clause aims to provide for competence of all personnel who perform tasks, for or on behalf of the organisation, that have the potential to cause a significant environmental impact. The following step-by-step approach, backed up by a procedure could effectively meet the requirements of this clause:...

  12. CHAPTER 6: DOCUMENTATION, DOCUMENT CONTROL AND RECORDS (CLAUSE 4.3.1)
    (pp. 35-38)

    It is necessary to understand the difference between the terms ‘document’ and ‘record’ before proceeding to the main contents of this chapter.

    Documents provide information, data or instructions and could be on any medium, such as print or electronic. Some examples of documents are:

    policies, objectives, targets, programmes or plans

    manuals and procedures

    work instructions or standard operating procedures

    photographs, videos or drawings providing instructions

    legal requirements

    formats and checklists (when blank).

    Records are a special category of documents. They provide evidence, results or facts relating to actions that have been taken by an organisation. Some examples of records are:...

  13. CHAPTER 7: OPERATIONAL CONTROLS (CLAUSE 4.4.6)
    (pp. 39-42)

    Operational controls may be defined as ‘measures taken to manage risks’. In the context of environmental management systems, ‘operational controls’ will be referred to as the methods and means implemented for managing environmental risks, where their absence could lead to:

    deviation from the company’s environmental policy, objectives and targets

    violation of specified legal or other applicable requirements

    environmental pollution.

    The following diagram explains the requirement of operational controls:

    Operational controls may be broadly categorised as administrative controls or engineering controls.

    Administrative controls include:

    written procedures or instructions (operations, waste/effluent/emission/hazardous substance management, utilities, etc.)

    supervision

    competence or training requirements

    permit to...

  14. CHAPTER 8: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE (CLAUSE 4.4.7)
    (pp. 43-46)

    The organisation shall establish and implement procedure(s) that identify potential emergency situations (that could negatively impact upon the environment), and also define mechanisms to respond to these situations. These actions must include mitigation of any adverse environmental impacts.

    The organisation must also periodically review and test these procedures.

    There are two main components to this clause, namely ‘preparedness’ and ‘response’.

    With a group of individuals from various functional areas in the organisation, it is important to brainstorm possible EMS accidents and emergencies.

    Review incident records for past years. Also review the environmental aspects list for potential emergencies under abnormal operating...

  15. CHAPTER 9: MEASURING AND MONITORING (CLAUSE 4.5.1)
    (pp. 47-48)

    It is necessary to establish and implement procedure(s) to measure and monitor those aspects of EMS performance that could have significant environmental impacts.

    The measurement and monitoring process must be viewed in a larger context and its scope extended to the entire environmental system. An organisation needs to define mechanisms and responsibilities for ongoing measuring and monitoring of key characteristics of those processes and activities that have the potential for significant environmental impacts.

    Key characteristics are those characteristics that provide vital information or can have significant influence on the environmental performance of the process, and thus need to be measured...

  16. CHAPTER 10: NON-CONFORMITY, CORRECTIVE AND PREVENTATIVE ACTION (CLAUSE 4.5.3)
    (pp. 49-52)

    The organisation shall establish a system for actions to be taken when a real or a potential non-conformity is determined.

    Investigate and determine the causes of non-conformities, take corrective or preventative actions (as applicable) and determine effectiveness of actions taken. Mitigation of environmental impacts is an integral part of corrective actions.

    It is best to explain in straightforward words the meaning of terms used in this chapter.

    Corrective actions involve correcting an existing non-conformity, determining its root cause and taking actions to prevent its recurrence.

    Preventative actions involve taking actions to eliminate the causes of potential non-conformities to prevent their...

  17. CHAPTER 11: INTERNAL AUDIT (CLAUSE 4.5.5)
    (pp. 53-56)

    Establish audit procedure(s) that define the responsibilities for planning, conducting, reporting, follow-up, frequency, scope and process for conducting internal environmental audits.

    The organisation shall ensure that internal EMS audits are conducted at planned intervals.

    The audits shall determine whether the EMS conforms to the planned arrangements and the requirements of ISO14001. Audits must also determine whether the EMS has been implemented effectively.

    Auditors shall be objective and impartial.

    It is best to begin by seeking clarity on the meaning of terms used in the audit process:

    Audits are intended to determine the extent to which an organisational system complies with...

  18. CHAPTER 12: MANAGEMENT REVIEW AND CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT (CLAUSE 4.5.6)
    (pp. 57-61)

    It is the responsibility of top management to review the performance of its EMS at defined intervals.

    The review is intended to determine how well the system is performing and how it can be improved further.

    The review must be based on inputs, such as audit results, legal compliance, communication(s) with interested parties, objectives, corrective and preventative actions, and recommendations for improvement.

    The top management should provide specific decisions and actions relating to continual improvements in the EMS.

    ‘Management review’ is the final platform upon which the performance and adequacy of the EMS is reviewed. Issues not reviewed in, or...

  19. CHAPTER 13: GREEN INITIATIVES
    (pp. 62-66)

    The term ‘green initiative’ may be referred to as ‘the schemes, projects or programmes undertaken for the betterment of the environment’, so as to eliminate or reduce the environmental footprint.

    The entire eco-system is facing a multitude of challenges caused by industrialisation, urbanisation and other activities that are a stress on the environment. Environmental degradation caused by pollution of air, water, land and atmosphere is considered a key reason for changes in climate, food shortages, extinction of flora and fauna, as well as many types of diseases. Industrialisation and commercial activities have been the biggest contributors in environmental degradation. The...

  20. APPENDIX A: SAMPLE PROCEDURE FOR IDENTIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS
    (pp. 67-72)
  21. APPENDIX B: SAMPLE PROCEDURE FOR INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION
    (pp. 73-75)
  22. APPENDIX C: SAMPLE PROCEDURE FOR CONTROL OF DOCUMENTS AND RECORDS
    (pp. 76-79)
  23. APPENDIX D: DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY ISO14001
    (pp. 80-82)
  24. APPENDIX E: RECORDS REQUIRED BY ISO14001
    (pp. 83-84)
  25. APPENDIX F: SAMPLE FORMAT FOR A NON-CONFORMITY REPORT (NCR)
    (pp. 85-87)
  26. APPENDIX G: SAMPLE PROCEDURE FOR INTERNAL EMS AUDIT
    (pp. 88-91)
  27. APPENDIX H: SAMPLE INPUT REPORT FOR EMS MANAGEMENT REVIEW
    (pp. 92-100)
  28. BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTES
    (pp. 101-101)
  29. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 102-104)