ITIL Lifecycle Essentials

ITIL Lifecycle Essentials: Your essential guide for the ITIL Foundation exam and beyond

CLAIRE AGUTTER
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 375
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh5wb
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  • Book Info
    ITIL Lifecycle Essentials
    Book Description:

    This book doesn’t just cover the information required to pass the foundation exam, but goes beyond this in providing practical guidance for when newly qualified practitioners enter the real-world. By addressing processes and concepts not covered in the syllabus, this book guides practitioners as they go beyond Foundation level. It features practical tips on using service management and, for each process, the author adds to the theory with lessons from her own real-world experience. The book is ideal for self-study candidates, training delegates and itSMF/BCS members, and V2 Foundation Certificate holders who have not yet taken the upgraded exam. Project managers looking to broaden their qualifications will find it a helpful companion to their studies and a practical aid for their professional development. Contractors or consultants with limited study time will also find this book essential to their part-time education.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-418-9
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-6)
    Barry Corless

    It is so difficult when writing a good service management book to find the right level to pitch it. It can be hard to find a book that has simple enough language that it can accompany a student’s foundation level studies, or act as an introduction to the topic. This book does that and provides, without question, a no nonsense interpretation of the key topics.

    However, readers so often want much, much more. Claire Agutter has succeeded by adding a number of practical implementation tips drawn from her varied background and leveraging her experience. In short, Claire has managed to...

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 7-8)
    Claire Agutter
  4. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 9-9)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 10-10)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. 11-14)
  7. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING SERVICE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 15-36)

    We’re going to start this book by taking a look at what service management actually means. ‘Service’ and ‘service management’ are commonly used terms in the modern IT organisation, so it’s worth spending some time analysing what they refer to and why they are important.

    In today’s world, information technology (IT) is a fully integrated part of everyone’s life. Whether using a smartphone, withdrawing cash from an ATM, paying bills, or booking tickets on the Internet, IT is there in everything we do. It often plays a supporting role, so we don’t even think about what we are using until...

  8. CHAPTER 2: KEY CONCEPTS AND ROLES
    (pp. 37-48)

    Most organisations recognise that they need some form of IT service management. Actually putting something in place to meet that need can be much more challenging. In this chapter, we’re going to study some of the key components of a service management capability: processes, functions and generic roles.

    The ITIL definition of a process is:

    A process is a structured set of activities designed to accomplish a specific objective. A process takes one or more defined inputs and turns them into defined outputs.

    To be effective, service management processes should be set up as closed-loop systems. This means that they...

  9. CHAPTER 3: THE SERVICE LIFECYCLE
    (pp. 49-61)

    ITIL is based around a service lifecycle with five phases, which has been documented as five core volumes. These cover a service’s life from start to finish, from conception through to ongoing improvement. These five volumes are referred to as the core of ITIL, and they provide high-level guidance and process information across the complete service lifecycle. The volumes are:

    Service Strategy

    Service Design

    Service Transition

    Service Operation

    Continual Service Improvement.

    The core is also supplemented by another series of books known as complementary guidance. The complementary publications provide further guidance that is more specific to industry sectors, organisation types,...

  10. CHAPTER 4: SERVICE STRATEGY
    (pp. 62-107)

    Service Strategy is the centre of the service lifecycle and the axis that all the other phases revolve around. The purpose of Service Strategy is to define what a service provider needs to do to support its customer. The Service Strategy adopted must support the organisation’s overall business outcomes. As part of its purpose, Service Strategy will define plans, patterns, a position and perspective for how the service provider will behave.

    Service Strategy has a number of objectives. These objectives will help to define how the rest of the service lifecycle works. The Service Strategy objectives include:

    understanding what strategy...

  11. CHAPTER 5: SERVICE DESIGN
    (pp. 108-184)

    Once a strategy has been defined and communicated, services can be designed to meet the strategic objectives. The purpose of the Service Design stage of the lifecycle is to design services that fulfil the strategic objectives, which are based on business requirements.

    IT processes, practices and policies also need to be designed to make sure that services are high quality, cost effective, and meet customer needs.

    The main objective of Service Design is to deliver a service which works. By ‘works’, we mean that it won’t need lots of improvement when it is live, reducing the cost of delivering the...

  12. CHAPTER 6: SERVICE TRANSITION
    (pp. 185-253)

    Once a service has been designed, it will be transitioned into the live environment. Transitions need to be carefully planned and managed, as they have the potential to negatively affect live services.

    The purpose of Service Transition is to make sure that new, modified or retired services meet the business expectations documented during Service Strategy and Service Design.

    Service Transition practices should lead to an organisation developing and improving its capabilities for getting new and changed services into the live environment.

    Processes need to be in place for release build, test and deployment to make sure that changes do what...

  13. CHAPTER 7: SERVICE OPERATION
    (pp. 254-335)

    Services only deliver value once they are live and being used by customers to achieve business outcomes. The purpose of Service Operation is to undertake activities and processes to manage and deliver services at the levels agreed with business users and customers.

    Service Operation manages the technology used to deliver services and collects information on service performance, and other defined service metrics. Service Operation is vital for effective service management. Services can be well designed and transitioned smoothly, but they still need to be managed in the live environment to ensure they keep working well.

    Service Operation covers all areas...

  14. CHAPTER 8: CONTINUAL SERVICE IMPROVEMENT
    (pp. 336-353)

    No IT service is perfect. On the rare occasion a service is fully aligned with business requirements, it won’t stay that way for long. Services need to be continually improved to make sure they stay aligned with changing business needs.

    Continual improvement can be applied to IT services, its structure and its processes. Service quality, service cost and the efficiency of service delivery all need to be considered as part of any continual improvement initiative.

    The purpose of the CSI stage of the lifecycle is to make sure services and service management are improved. To do this, CSI must identify...

  15. CHAPTER 9: SERVICE MANAGEMENT AUTOMATION
    (pp. 354-360)

    Once a task or process has been introduced and performed regularly, the next step is often to try to automate it. Automation can improve the performance of people, processes, management and organisation structures. It can also improve the way that knowledge and information is shared between parts of the organisation.

    Automation can improve the utility and the warranty of services. Some of the areas of improvement include:

    automated resources can have their capacity adjusted easily

    automated resources don’t need human intervention, so can be available across time zones or service hours

    automated systems can be measured and improved

    computers can...

  16. CHAPTER 10: SERVICE MANAGEMENT TRAINING AND QUALIFICATIONS
    (pp. 361-364)

    Service management can only be successful if staff have the right skills to do their job. Staff who don’t have the right skills may feel de-motivated, and won’t understand how their role contributes to the value that the customer receives. As services change and evolve, staff may need training or different roles to evolve with them.

    The whole service lifecycle depends on trained, motivated and experienced staff. Staff need to understand business priorities, and how IT supports them. They need customer service skills, and the ability to innovate. Staff need to be willing to follow and improve processes and procedures....

  17. CHAPTER 11: MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAM STRATEGIES
    (pp. 365-369)

    This chapter contains some guidance for those using this book to prepare for the ITIL Foundation Certificate in IT Service Management.

    Once you have successfully passed your exam, you can use this book as a reference guide and you may not need to look at this chapter again.

    The Foundation certificate provides formal certification that a delegate has a good general understanding of ITIL concepts and processes. It is a compulsory, entry-level certificate before delegates can take any higher-level ITIL exams. This book provides you with all the information you need to successfully take the ITIL Foundation exam, as well...

  18. CHAPTER 12: FURTHER READING/RESOURCES
    (pp. 370-371)

    These links will provide further information on some of the topics covered in this book.

    ITIL Glossary of Terms:www.itil-officialsite.com/InternationalActivities/TranslatedGlossaries.aspx

    Mintzberg, the four Ps of strategy:www.ifm.eng.cam.ac.uk/research/dstools/mintzbergs-5-ps-for-strategy/

    Kepner Tregoe Problem Management technique:www.kepner-tregoe.com/

    Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA):www.sfia.org.uk

    IT Service Management Forum:www.itsmfi.org

    Val IT™ for Business Technology Management:www.isaca.org/Knowledge-Center/Val-IT-IT-Value-Delivery-/Pages/Val-IT1.aspx

    COBIT®:www.isaca.org/Knowledge-Center/cobit/Pages/Overview.aspx

    CMMI:http://cmmiinstitute.com/

    The Institute of Risk Management:www.theirm.org

    Management of Risk (M_o_R®):www.mor-officialsite.com/

    List of ITIL Examination Institutes:www.itil-officialsite.com/ExaminationInstitutes/ExamInstitutes.aspx

    List of ITIL Accredited Training Organisations:www.itil-officialsite.com/TrainingOrganisations/ATOListing.aspx...

  19. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 372-375)