The Definitive Guide to IT Service Metrics

The Definitive Guide to IT Service Metrics

KURT McWHIRTER
TED GAUGHAN
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 311
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh61q
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  • Book Info
    The Definitive Guide to IT Service Metrics
    Book Description:

    The metrics in this book will bring many benefits to both the IT department and the business as a whole. Details of the attributes of each metric are given, enabling you to make the right choices for your business. You may prefer and are encouraged to design and create your own metrics to bring even more value to your business – this book will show you how to do this, too. This book is the first book to be published in the itSMF USA Thought Leadership series.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-406-6
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-5)
    Suzanne D. Van Hove

    Metrics. A word that strikes ‘panic’ in many service managers. It seems no matter where I travel or who I speak to, it is an area that is a constant question. ‘What do I measure? How often? Do I just take the measures from ITIL®and use them – they are published, they must be right. Right? Right?’ Inevitably, my response focuses on the practical, ‘What is the goal? What hurts? What are you trying to change?’ Until now, there really has not been a reference where the ‘why measure this’ question was answered.

    Finally,The Definitive Guide to IT...

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 6-8)
    Toby R. Gouker
  4. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. 9-9)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 10-10)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. 11-12)
  7. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 13-15)

    We know change is inevitable. However, in many cases we donʹt seem to be fully prepared for the change. This is becoming more apparent in the Information Technology (IT) industries and organizations as changes in cultures and the working environment seem to meet greater resistance. Changing our technologies is relatively easy due to the rapid nature of change in our hardware and software and our willingness to apply these changes to remain up to date. Therefore, change is commonplace in any technology field; or is it?

    Managing the infrastructure, both hardware and software, in our technology-centric world has commoditized the...

  8. CHAPTER 2: USING METRICS
    (pp. 16-30)

    There are many ways to utilize metrics and get value from them and no one method is the best. The methods used to develop and implement metrics should be adapted to fit your needs and situation. Developing, implementing, and managing metrics goes well beyond simply purchasing a monitoring tool and collecting measurements. From our standpoint, metrics help us understand:

    Customers and their behaviors

    Industries and how they work

    The current environment (e.g. resources, budgets, locations, etc.)

    The infrastructure supporting services

    The value of the services provided

    Cost-justification for the service (comparing cost of the service to the benefits gained).

    Therefore,...

  9. CHAPTER 3: SERVICE STRATEGY METRICS
    (pp. 31-67)

    Service strategy provides guidance and direction for the provision and delivery of services through the service lifecycle. Strategy helps the organization to understand the outcomes and expectations of the business. Services are then delivered and supported by the processes found within the service lifecycle.

    Strategy will begin with the vision and mission of the organization to create policies and plans for building a business focused culture and mindset throughout the department(s).

    Strategy processes and metrics are used throughout the lifecycle ensuring that the processes and services continue to deliver business outcomes. The metrics in this chapter are tied to the...

  10. CHAPTER 4: SERVICE DESIGN METRICS
    (pp. 68-163)

    Metrics for service design processes provide the capability to evaluate designs of new or changed services for transition into an operational state. These metrics are used to objectively assess the effectiveness of new or changed service designs to deliver the intended service capabilities. The metrics sections for this chapter are:

    Design co-ordination metrics

    Service catalog metrics

    Service level management metrics

    Availability management metrics

    Capacity management metrics

    IT service continuity management metrics

    Information security management metrics

    Supplier management metrics.

    Service design activities must be properly co-ordinated to ensure the service design goals and objectives are met. The Design co-ordination process encompasses...

  11. CHAPTER 5: SERVICE TRANSITION METRICS
    (pp. 164-223)

    Service transition provides guidance on effectively managing the transition of design services into a delivered operational state. Transition management ensures a disciplined, repeatable approach for implementing new and changed services to minimize quality/technical, schedule and cost risk exposure. It helps ensure new and changed services are delivered with the complete functionality prescribed by the service strategy requirements and built into the service design package.

    Service transition processes and metrics are used throughout the service lifecycle as part of sustaining service delivery to meet business needs. The metrics in this chapter are linked to the Critical Success Factors (CSFs) and KPIs...

  12. CHAPTER 6: SERVICE OPERATION METRICS
    (pp. 224-278)

    Service operation is where the majority of metrics are collected as production services are provided to the customers. Service operation achieves effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery and support of services, ensuring value for both the customer and the service provider. Service operation maintains operational stability while allowing for changes in the design, scale, scope and service levels. This stage of the lifecycle is the culmination of the efforts provided in strategy, design, and transition. Service operation represents the successful efforts for the previous lifecycle phases to the customers with the successful delivery of services and creating high levels of...

  13. CHAPTER 7: ADDITIONAL METRICS
    (pp. 279-305)

    A wide range of operational infrastructure systems, resources, capabilities, and processes may be part of IT service delivery. The focus of this chapter is the processes, outside of the service management lifecycle, that support the business and the service provider. The information in this chapter provides metrics for those additional processes that support the provision of services. The metrics sections for this chapter are:

    Project management metrics

    Risk management metrics

    Data center metrics.

    Metrics most commonly applied in project management are based on Earned Value Management (EVM) for monitoring and controlling cost and schedule performance. These are standard measurements that...

  14. REFERENCES
    (pp. 306-307)
  15. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 308-311)