Selection Management: For Systems and Services

Selection Management: For Systems and Services

JACQUIE WAKEFORD
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 105
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh645
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  • Book Info
    Selection Management: For Systems and Services
    Book Description:

    This book describes a simplified selection process that maintains a reasonable level of due diligence, and which can be tailored to suit each organisation’s specific needs. Key stages described include: Defining selection parameters, gathering requirements, balancing costs against benefits. Creating the “long list” of candidates, then drafting and issuing a Request For Information (RFI). Forming the review team and using agreed criteria to determine a short list, Performing an in-depth investigation then making the preferred selection, Overview of next steps including negotiating contract terms, running a proof of concept, and implementing the chosen solution, Each chapter includes templates of documents that will be used during the selection process.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-426-4
    Subjects: Business, Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-6)
    Martyn Croft

    ‘Choose wisely’ may be one of the best pieces of advice you are ever given, but, like all good advice, the trick lies in how to put it into practice.

    In business we are faced with choices on a regular basis and the decisions we make may have far-reaching consequences. Certainly in the business of information technology it is important that our systems and services are up to the job and capable of meeting our information processing requirements. Briefly articulate those requirements in a search engine and a quick trawl of the web will undoubtedly uncover many ways to meet...

  3. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 7-7)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 8-8)
  5. Table of Contents
    (pp. 9-10)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 11-14)

    Selection of a new system or supplier can be crucial to your business, but it’s something that many organisations don’t do very often and so don’t have much experience in. This book provides a straightforward process to follow, which will guide you through selection and help you to choose wisely.

    Of course, this is only one of a number of possible approaches. It’s worth focusing briefly on how this selection process differs from the formal procurement process usually followed by larger, and public sector, organisations. A formal procurement usually involves production of a very detailed specification, covering, in extreme clarity,...

  7. CHAPTER 1: OVERALL PROCESS
    (pp. 15-25)

    Before we get into the details of each stage, it’s useful to understand the whole process, so you can see how it all fits together. This will also aid you in planning the selection activities; a number of people are likely to be involved and they will all need advance notice of what’s expected , so that they can plan their diaries accordingly.

    In this chapter, we will look at:

    stages in the process

    what documentation you may produce

    how the process can fit with your project management methodology.

    The overall ‘vanilla’ process looks like this (see Figure 1) (bearing...

  8. CHAPTER 2: DEFINE SELECTION PARAMETERS
    (pp. 26-35)

    Once you’ve identified a need to select a new system or service, the temptation is to simply ‘get on with it’ and immediately start to look at possible options. However, there are a number of important steps to take before you do that. These are:

    Decide who should be involved in the selection process.

    Make sure you have clear reasons for doing the selection.

    Make sure you know what outcome you expect from the selection (i.e. what you expect to achieve from having the new system or service).

    Agree the scope of the selection (i.e. where the boundaries are, what’s...

  9. CHAPTER 3: GATHER REQUIREMENTS
    (pp. 36-45)

    Once you’ve been through the tasks in the previous chapter, you will have a very good overview understanding of what is needed from the new system or service. The next step is to obtain a more detailed specification of what’s needed.

    In this chapter, we will look at:

    the purpose and objectives of requirements

    who should be involved

    different ways to gather requirements

    detailing and prioritising requirements

    how to write up requirements

    a requirements specification document template.

    You may ask yourself why this exercise is needed. After all, you already know what you need, don’t you?

    There are several reasons:...

  10. CHAPTER 4: DRAFT THE REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI)
    (pp. 46-56)

    After agreeing the selection parameters and gathering the requirements, you will have most of the information you need to draft the Request for Information (RFI) document. It is worth looking at the purpose of this document in more detail, as well as the steps needed to produce the draft, before getting into the detail of what the document should contain.

    As the responses to this document will be the primary means for shortlisting your options, it’s important to take the time to get it right.

    This chapter contains:

    purpose of the RFI

    possible alternatives to an RFI

    how to compile...

  11. CHAPTER 5: AGREE LONGLIST AND ISSUE RFI
    (pp. 57-63)

    After drafting your RFI, you will need to get it reviewed and agreed, then you’re ready to issue it – but you first need to decide who to! Once you’ve decided on your longlist, you may want to consider getting them to sign a non-disclosure agreement. You should also make contact with each supplier before issuing the RFI.

    This chapter covers:

    reviewing and agreeing the RFI

    compiling the longlist of suppliers

    non-disclosure agreements

    managing the issue procedure, including initial contact.

    Once you’ve drafted your RFI, you will need to get the core team to review it and agree it. That sounds...

  12. CHAPTER 6: AGREE REVIEW CRITERIA AND TEAM
    (pp. 64-73)

    Once you’ve issued the RFI, you’ve then got a few weeks to plan how you will deal with the responses. In this period there are a few useful things you can do to prepare, such as getting the team ready, agreeing the criteria and drafting a scoresheet.

    This chapter covers:

    agreeing the review team

    determining the review criteria

    options for reviewing, including weighting the criteria

    example scoresheets

    dealing with the suppliers.

    Generally, the review team will be the core selection team. However, you may want to include others if appropriate. For example, there may be a specialist element to the...

  13. CHAPTER 7: REVIEW RESPONSES AND PRODUCE SHORTLIST
    (pp. 74-80)

    Once you’ve received all the responses, you and the team need to spend time reviewing them. Then you can agree (hopefully) a shortlist of around three options.

    This chapter covers:

    how to review the responses

    example summary of responses document template

    how to shortlist

    what to do if a decision cannot be reached

    advising the rejected suppliers.

    You won’t be surprised to hear that you need to read the responses and fill in your criteria sheets, including scoring if you decided to do that.

    This sounds easy and straightforward! And with a few responses it will be. Some suppliers will...

  14. CHAPTER 8: IN-DEPTH INVESTIGATION
    (pp. 81-90)

    Once you have your shortlist, you are ready to start looking at each of the choices in much more detail. This will normally include activities such as demonstrations, more detailed questioning, taking references and financial checks.

    (During these activities, remember the strictures of the Bribery Act, as detailed inChapter 6.) This chapter covers:

    common activities for your in-depth investigation

    example pitch meeting notes template

    possible additional activities.

    The selection team should discuss and agree what activities are needed in order to make a final choice. The type and level of detail should relate to the importance and cost of...

  15. CHAPTER 9: FINAL SELECTION
    (pp. 91-97)

    The final stage of the selection process – at last! You will have gathered a mass of information about each supplier and the team will hopefully have clear opinions as to their preferences. Once the team have agreed on a preferred option, you may decide to have a pilot or scoping exercise before moving into final negotiation and contracts. Finally, once the selection is concluded, you will need to write up the results and reasoning.

    This chapter covers:

    making the final selection

    whether to have a final activity – or not

    contract negotiation

    example evaluation report template.

    It’s best to do this...

  16. CHAPTER 10: NEXT STEPS
    (pp. 98-101)

    You are finally there. The selection is made, the contract is signed and you are ready to start – so what now? For a system selection, you are only at the end of the beginning – you will still need to develop/configure and implement the application. For a service supplier, you may be ready to start.

    This chapter covers:

    guidance on the likely next steps for:

    a package system implementation

    a bespoke system implementation

    a new supplier starting to provide their service

    learning lessons from the selection process.

    The likely steps are:

    The supplier may want to run a kick-off meeting, to...

  17. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 102-105)