Changing how you manage and communicate change

Changing how you manage and communicate change: Focusing on the human side of change

NAOMI KARTEN
Series: Soft Skills
Copyright Date: 2009
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 174
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh664
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  • Book Info
    Changing how you manage and communicate change
    Book Description:

    Changing How You Manage and Communicate Change deals with the issue of change from a refreshingly different perspective. Its premise is that change will proceed more smoothly and effectively if serious consideration is given to the people aspects. The book offers ideas, guidelines and advice to help you implement change in a way which respects those affected, using communication skills as guidance tools.

    eISBN: 978-1-905356-95-9
    Subjects: Management & Organizational Behavior

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. ABOUT THE SOFT SKILLS FOR IT PROFESSIONALS SERIES
    (pp. 5-5)
    Angela Wilde
  3. FOREWORD
    (pp. 6-8)
    Eileen Strider and Wayne Strider

    Communication is to managing change as air is to breathing. Nobody knows this better than Naomi Karten. We who work at the intersection of business and IT are fortunate that she has written this book.

    We first met Naomi Karten in 1989 in Mt. Crested Butte, Colorado. Coincidentally, our professional interest in human change started that same year, when we worked as IT managers for a large aerospace company. From then on, our paths kept crossing. Every September we would meet again in Mt. Crested Butte. In 1992, Wayne started teaching Problem Solving Leadership workshops with Naomi. In 1995, Naomi...

  4. PREFACE
    (pp. 9-12)
  5. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 13-14)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. 15-15)
  7. Table of Contents
    (pp. 16-16)
  8. CHAPTER 1: COULD THIS BE YOU?
    (pp. 17-30)

    The residents of a small village reelected the dead mayor. According to one resident, ‘I know he died, but I don’t want change.’¹

    Whenever I mention this quote to people, they laugh. But often the laughter is accompanied by a nod of recognition. As amusing as this resident’s comment is, the wish that things could be otherwise is a universal yearning. Who, after all, hasn’t, at one time or another, wished that things could return to the way they once were?

    People don’t like change. Obviously, it would be inaccurate to claim that no oneeverlikes change. Life is...

  9. CHAPTER 2: ILLUMINATING THE EXPERIENCE OF CHANGE
    (pp. 31-42)

    Think about a major change you experienced at work. How did it affect you? For example:

    1 What was your initial reaction to the change?

    2 Did you notice any impact on your concentration, mood, productivity, energy level, or health?

    3 Did you at any point wish you could restore things to the way they were before?

    4 What was the experience like in adjusting to the change?

    5 How did your attitude and well-being after you adjusted to the change compare with when it first happened?

    Numerous change models depict the experience that people have in accepting, absorbing, and...

  10. CHAPTER 3: CHAOS AND THE SATIR CHANGE MODEL
    (pp. 43-62)

    You can be more effective in coping with changes that come your way if you understand what makes change so unsettling and what you can do to expedite your progress to a new steady state. And you can be more effective in helping others cope with change if you understand what throwsthemout of balance and what you can do to help them restore a sense of balance.

    This chapter presents the Satir change model as a framework for helping yourself and others through change.

    The components of this model are:

    1 Old status quo: the current normal.

    2...

  11. CHAPTER 4: UNIVERSAL TRUTHS ABOUT CHANGE
    (pp. 63-79)

    Change would be so much easier to cope with if only we could make our way from old status quo, through chaos, to new status quo, uninterrupted by other chaos-producing circumstances. And wouldn’t it be refreshing if, having reached a new status quo, we could relax there for a while before facing the next bout of chaos?

    But life is a series of foreign elements that come at us from all directions. Invariably, whether we’re luxuriating in old status quo, coping with chaos, traversing practice and integration, or settling into a new status quo, there’s another foreign element and another...

  12. CHAPTER 5: DIFFERENCES IN RECEPTIVENESS TO CHANGE
    (pp. 80-94)

    Imagine a major company-wide reorganization. Reporting structures change, departments are split up or rearranged in odd ways, responsibilities are shifted around. Some people lose their jobs, some are moved laterally, some are promoted. It’s as if the executives had put on blindfolds and then rearranged all the boxes in the organization chart.

    That probably sounds familiar, but keep imagining. The next day, people arrive at work, go to their new work locations, and do their jobs perfectly. Best of all, everyone supports the change. Not a whimper. Not a complaint. No confusion, hesitation, or agitation. Work proceeds exactly as it...

  13. CHAPTER 6: ASSESSING YOUR RESPONSE TO CHANGE
    (pp. 95-102)

    As they say on the airplane, put the oxygen mask on yourself before putting it on the child sitting next to you. Or as one airline put it, ‘before putting it on the child sitting next to you, or the person sitting next to you who is acting like a child.’ (This is an airline that understands that humor in conveying critical information increases the odds that people will actually pay attention. The wisest, most relevant communication is worthless if the people it’s intended for ignore it.)

    But this advice is not just oxygen-specific, nor is it limited to emergencies....

  14. CHAPTER 7: BUILDING A FOUNDATION FOR MANAGING CHANGE
    (pp. 103-116)

    During times of change, there’s invariably a great deal you can’t control. But you’ll be in a much better position to manage change, if you do certain things during calmer times that youcancontrol and that are much more difficult to accomplish during the turbulence of chaos.

    Three things youcancontrol are:

    1 creating trusting relationships

    2 establishing team norms

    3 conducting temperature readings.

    This chapter offers some thoughts about why you’d benefit from undertaking these efforts, and how to do so.

    Building trust is the number one prerequisite to leading a successful change effort, and it’s a...

  15. CHAPTER 8: INTRODUCING CHANGE THOUGHTFULLY
    (pp. 117-126)

    In introducing change, managers tend to focus on what is changing – that is, the technical aspects of the change. In the process, they often overlook, or give too little attention to, the human aspects of the change. The human aspects are the focus of this chapter. In particular:

    1 Identifying who will be affected by a change.

    2 Minimizing the compounding effect of chaos.

    3 Not withholding news of looming foreign elements.

    4 Explaining the reasons for a change.

    Who will be affected by a given change? It’s easy to answer this question narrowly, without considering the broader impact. For...

  16. CHAPTER 9: TALKING TO THE PEOPLE AFFECTED BY CHANGE
    (pp. 127-143)

    This chapter and the next one offer specific suggestions for reducing the duration and intensity of the chaos associated with change. I’ve touched on many of these ideas in previous chapters, but these two chapters pull them all together in one place.

    This chapter focuses on the following suggestions for communicating to and with the people who are coping with change:

    1 Seek understanding.

    2 Talk to the naysayers.

    3 Reduce the uncertainty associated with change.

    4 Communicate even in the absence of information.

    5 Communicate about information you can’t disclose.

    6 Explain the impact of a change on those...

  17. CHAPTER 10: OFFERING CARING COMMUNICATION
    (pp. 144-158)

    This chapter adds to Chapter 9 by offering the following suggestions for caring communication and communicating with care:

    1 Focus on thoughts, feelings, and needs.

    2 Speak of the old way with respect.

    3 Recognize the power of empathy.

    4 Listen persuasively.

    5 Monitor your choice of voice.

    6 Offer encouragement.

    7 Use humor – judiciously.

    8 Acknowledge success and progress.

    When you meet with subordinates and others to inquire how well they’re handling the change, be careful with your wording. The reason is that some people are more oriented toward thinking and others are more oriented toward thinking and others...

  18. CHAPTER 11: LEARNING FROM THE EXPERIENCE OF CHANGE
    (pp. 159-172)

    Numerous colleagues who work in and with IT have told me about change efforts characterized by a serious disregard for the people affected. In a striking number of change efforts, people were given no rationale for the change, no information about the goal, no idea about what would happen and when, no clue as to how it would affect their work, and little support to ease the transition.

    The words my colleagues used in describing the experience of those affected have included ‘apathy,’ ‘sadness,’ ‘burdened,’ ‘betrayed,’ ‘unmotivated,’ ‘miserable,’ and ‘depressed.’

    It needn’t be this way.

    In the best of cases,...

  19. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 173-176)
  20. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 177-178)