Everything you want to know about Organisational Change

Everything you want to know about Organisational Change

DARREN ARCANGEL
BRIAN JOHNSON
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 159
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh67m
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  • Book Info
    Everything you want to know about Organisational Change
    Book Description:

    Given particular consideration is the role of IT in managing change, and the way in which it can be both an enabler and an inhibitor of change. This book will enable you to ensure that all departments in your organisation work together efficiently and effectively, making your business more productive and profitable. The book will enable you to: Know about the key drivers of change and how to respond to them, identify when change is necessary, and the risks of resistance, Understand the key things to consider when faced with change – Why? What? How? Who? When?, Be aware of the six major facets of business and how they interconnect, Use IT to maximum effect, smooth your path to change and minimise potential problems, Manage the transition.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-198-0
    Subjects: Management & Organizational Behavior

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. 5-6)
    Adam Elster

    In every leadership position I’ve held, my philosophy has been the same: hire smart, self-motivated, creative people, and establish an environment conducive to teaming and leadership. I’ve found that to be particularly important in my current position as General Manager, Services, Support and Education for CA Technologies. One of the talents I admire most is the ability to create thought leadership, whether through an article, white paper or, in this case, a book.

    The authoring of this book was the culmination of a multinational team effort. US-based authors, Brian and Darren, drew from the expertise and experience of a number...

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 7-11)
  4. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. 12-13)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 14-15)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. 16-18)
  7. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 19-19)

    Organisational change has been the subject of many books, and will continue to be the subject of many more. This book considers such change in the modern context of information systems and information technology, both being enablers (and sometimes inhibitors) of business change.

    IT is often considered to be inextricably linked to business – mostly by IT pundits; however, the popularity of outsourcing IT, and the increasing profile of software being provided as a service, are proof points that business may not share that point of view. If IT does not deliver value and benefit, it will be outsourced, no argument....

  8. CHAPTER 1: WHY DO ORGANISATIONS EXIST?
    (pp. 20-32)

    A politically incorrect answer to this question would be that organisations exist to allow individuals to make money (in the private sector), or to wield power (in the public sector). After all, in the case of the former, the world economy is dependent on businesses making capital and creating wealth and, in the case of the latter, whether democratically elected, or simply being the ruling party, society would fail to function if it were not organised. Of course, the degree of satisfaction we have with either organisation entirely depends on where you sit.

    If we examine the question from either...

  9. CHAPTER 2: WHY CHANGE THE ORGANISATION?
    (pp. 33-47)

    Change is nothing new in business. It is an inevitable consequence of existence – as Sartre certainly did not say, but that is, however, a certainty in itself. Most businesses are accustomed to continual change. What is new, is the scale of change affecting business. It has become commonplace for business to experience radical, dramatic, far-reaching and fundamental change. So much so, that what is regarded as life-changing, is now largely a matter of perception. To some, a new line of business, or the outsourcing of non-core activities, might be a dramatic change; to others, such changes may be viewed as...

  10. CHAPTER 3: CHANGE ISSUES
    (pp. 48-72)

    The beginning of this chapter discusses conditions, goals and the environment. Later, we move onto describing solutions and approaches.

    When changing the organisation, irrespective of the reasons for change, IT is unlikely to be the first aspect considered to be a problem; however, many issues will materially impact on the IT infrastructure and applications running on that infrastructure – together these are the services consumed by the business (and the customers of that business) to run its business(es).

    Consider the following:

    The change driver – why are we changing the business and for whom? Business in this context could be a service...

  11. CHAPTER 4: CHANGING THE ORGANISATION
    (pp. 73-104)

    The diagnosis of the problems facing the organisation, and any ideas you might have to solve the problems, is one thing, but what next? It is certainly a good idea to simplify the task of changing the business and its IT in your mind. This means focusing on the key issues: upon the changes that are most important and those that are the most urgent. It means breaking the task into manageable components that deliver measurable benefits to the business. It means defining clearly what is to be done, when and by whom. It means allocating responsibility and ownership for...

  12. CHAPTER 5: SIZING AND BUILDING THE ORGANISATION
    (pp. 105-120)

    Organisational sizing and building is not necessarily a complex task, the problem is that to do it well, it is very time-consuming and labour intensive and, particularly in the era of immediate gratification (or, at least, the expectation of immediate gratification, with life being lived over handheld devices), anything that looks like hard work is either dismissed, or there becomes a belief that a short cut will exist that will make all the hard work go away.

    Such thinking leads to acceptance (or rather a sort of rabid blind faith) that a method exists to wave a magic wand over...

  13. CHAPTER 6: USING IT TO CATALYSE BUSINESS TRANSFORMATIONS
    (pp. 121-130)

    This chapter revisits our introductory themes, and amplifies some of the points we made there in regard to the symbiotic (some would argue parasitic) link between business and IT. IS and IT may be painful to control and manage, and the long-standing belief that it is both expensive and under-performing, not to say unresponsive, often leads to IT being relegated to a subsidiary role, as we discussed, being engaged very late in strategic planning. The role of IT capabilities and deployment in making the transformations should not be underestimated.

    If, for example, your organisation is to be taken over, responsibility...

  14. CHAPTER 7: SUMMARY OF MAIN ISSUES
    (pp. 131-139)

    Although discussed extensively in this book, IT will be mentioned only in the later paragraphs in this chapter. The reason being (as was mentioned in the Preface and stressed throughout the book) that IT should follow business change!

    From experience of being involved with numerous IT-related business change projects (and many projects for business transformation that werenotpredicated on use of IT), in both the public and private sectors, we have drawn together key, often common, elements that need to be addressed when managing change. The following guidance arises from that experience; keep in mind that as we have...

  15. APPENDIX 1: MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS
    (pp. 140-156)
  16. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 157-159)