Illustrating PRINCE2

Illustrating PRINCE2: Project management in real terms

SUSAN TUTTLE
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 226
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh70p
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  • Book Info
    Illustrating PRINCE2
    Book Description:

    Written by an experienced practitioner and trainer, this step-by-step guide breaks down the PRINCE2® methodology into bite-size chunks, giving clear explanations and practical illustrations in each section. It will show you how to effectively apply the principles, themes and processes of PRINCE2® to your project. Use this book to: Understand what PRINCE2® actually means in real terms and real language, Gain insight into what the PRINCE2® method offers you as a project manager, Learn from others who have used the methodology well or badly, Use others’ experiences as your starting point for your application of PRINCE2® , Learn better strategies for using PRINCE2® to manage the day-to-day aspects of your projects.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-326-7
    Subjects: Management & Organizational Behavior

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 2-4)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. 5-5)
  3. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 6-6)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 6-6)
  5. Table of Contents
    (pp. 7-7)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 8-9)

    This book can be used as a guide to understanding the PRINCE2®framework. It uses everyday language and everyday experiences. By providing a real-life context around the method, the translations and illustrations will provide evidence of how to use (and how not to use) the PRINCE2®method.

    Each topic in this book is broken into three subsections. The first subsection will provide a basic background for the PRINCE2®subject being investigated. The second will attempt to translate that subject into layman’s terms. Finally, an illustration will give even more clarification and enable further insight into the given area of project...

  7. CHAPTER 1: PRINCE2® OVERVIEW
    (pp. 10-15)

    According towww.businessdictionary.com, guiding principles can be defined as a “broad philosophy that guides an organization throughout its life in all circumstances, irrespective of changes in its goals, strategies, type of work, or the top management.” Principles in the PRINCE2®approach can be defined similarly. Seven underlying principles should be applied to every project, regardless of what is going on inside or outside the project environment. They are sound, proven rules, which can be used as guideposts on the way to project success.

    By no means was Jermina’s project perfect, yet she and her project management team received a company-sponsored...

  8. CHAPTER 2: SEVEN PRINCIPLES
    (pp. 16-26)

    Not only should a project be justified in its original expenditure commitment, but the reasons behind it should remain valid throughout the entire expenditure. If the reasons disappear, a decision should be made by management to continue at a loss or stop the effort.

    A jilted bride, whose fiancé has recently dumped her for one of the bridesmaids, has a decision to make. She has already paid her deposit for the wedding hall. The reason for paying for the wedding was that there was going to be a wedding. The benefits of being a happy, loving couple starting out their...

  9. CHAPTER 3: SEVEN THEMES
    (pp. 27-39)

    The business case sets out the case to the business. “Please give us (the project team) your money today, and we will create products that will result in benefits in the future” would be a business case, for example. It may seem that businesses must take a gamble on one project idea over all the others. But with solid research, diligent fact-finding, and careful financial assessment, the gamble can also be seen as taking a calculated risk.

    Over the last few years, politicians have been trying to persuade the general public that the solution to our pending electricity shortages is...

  10. CHAPTER 4: SEVEN PROCESSES
    (pp. 40-55)

    To trigger a PRINCE2®project, someone with enough authority from within an organization needs to commission the project idea. The project idea is presented as a project mandate – either formally as a written document, or informally as a verbal request. Regardless of presentation, the idea is still just an idea. Even if it is a wonderful idea, it may be that it is not possible to execute – perhaps due to the organization’s existing time and resources, or because it’s not sustainable, or maybe because business conditions have changed and the idea is no longer valid. The Starting up a Project...

  11. CHAPTER 5: STARTING UP A PROJECT
    (pp. 56-66)

    To get the project idea off the ground, a member of management with enough seniority, interest and authority will need to be appointed. This person will own the project, but will rarely have enough time to dedicate to doing it. Therefore, s/he will appoint a project manager. The project manager will do the legwork. They will research the idea and work with stakeholders amongst others (including the executive) to gather high-level information on which a decision to start the project or not can be based. The project manager should be trusted by the executive, as his/her skills will be required...

  12. CHAPTER 6: DIRECTING A PROJECT
    (pp. 67-76)

    Once an idea that is at least worthy of a second (more detailed) look has been discovered, a request will be sent to the project board to authorize initiation. This decision publicly shows commitment to the organization and other senior managers. In essence, the project board is saying, “This idea has been deemed worthy of further investigation. If the project manager comes around to bother you or your staff, it probably has to do with this project, and s/he has our permission.” By making this decision, the project board does not commit itself to the entire project, as only a...

  13. CHAPTER 7: INITIATING A PROJECT
    (pp. 77-95)

    The project management team needs to decide how they want to manage risks before they can start to manage them on the project. Each project will be different, not only because of the people involved, but the size and nature of the project. Some organizations will have strict risk management guidelines, while others may not have any. Additionally, partnership projects will need to investigate the best method for the project: theirs, ours, or a combination of the two?

    Sample considerations:

    How risk-averse is the organization and the project board?

    How will risk management be delegated throughout the project management team?...

  14. CHAPTER 8: CONTROLLING A STAGE
    (pp. 96-110)

    In order for a project manager to remain in control of a stage, s/he must know what is happening in that stage at all times. Through the use of work packages, s/he gets to decide how and when to authorize work to begin, continue and end. It’s not enough for the project manager to delegate work to team managers; a corresponding acceptance of the work package will also be required. In the negotiations of asking for work to be completed and the accepting of that work, the project manager and team manager will need to decide and agree on procedures,...

  15. CHAPTER 9: MANAGING PRODUCT DELIVERY
    (pp. 111-115)

    This step figuratively or literally represents a handshake between the team manager and the project manager. The two parties must understand and agree to the work being requested and all the conditions of time, cost, quality, scope and effort.

    The project manager is responsible for managing the project, not for doing the work. Therefore, s/he decides when work should be done, by whom and under what constraints. The team manager is paid to get the specialist work completed. When the project manager authorizes a work package, the team manager agrees (most likely after some negotiation) to do the work within...

  16. CHAPTER 10: MANAGING A STAGE BOUNDARY
    (pp. 116-126)

    Unless they are clairvoyant and able to see into the future, no project manager can accurately predict the distant future. Issues, risks and changes all impact a project in an ad hoc fashion, causing need for adjustments, modifications and corrections to be made along the way. For this reason, the project is broken into stages, and only the next stage is planned in detail. The project manager (possibly with the aid of team managers, project support and guidance from project assurance) should be able to plan in detail for the next stage with some level of certainty. This planning activity,...

  17. CHAPTER 11: CLOSING A PROJECT
    (pp. 127-135)

    Before closing down and handing things over, the project manager has to confirm that everything that had been set out to be delivered by this project has been. The project plan needs to be updated with all the actual information presented against the plans to prove all the work agreed on for this project has been completed. Additionally, a report will prove that all the products from the project have been granted “approved” status. The report – known as a product status account – will demonstrate that the products have all been tested and approved to meet their agreed quality criteria. And...

  18. CHAPTER 12: ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS AND PROCEDURES
    (pp. 136-166)

    The project is responsible for creating products. These products are the outputs, which are handed over to the user community(ies) for use in business as usual. Just because the users have access to or knowledge of an output does not guarantee that they will actually use it. The outcome is the consequence of actually using the output. A change in behavior (i.e. the outcome) happens by using the new output, and becomes embedded in the organization when it is stable and considered the norm. The benefit(s) are the measurable improvements caused by this change in behavior and new way of...

  19. CHAPTER 13: TAILORING PRINCE2®
    (pp. 167-169)

    PRINCE2®is designed to be used with any project – big or small, simple or complex, part of a program or stand-alone, in a single organization or multi-organizational, an internal relationship or a commercial relationship, in the private sector or public sector, etc. No matter what the situation or arrangements for the project, considerations of how extensive and how formal PRINCE2®as a framework will be applied need to be made and understood by all interested parties. Without care, PRINCE2®can be become overly bureaucratic for smaller, simpler projects, or gain larger, more complex projects the reputation of being “PRINCE2®in...

  20. CHAPTER 14: ROLES
    (pp. 170-187)

    The project board members need to have enough authority within the organization to make decisions about the project (for example, to authorize plans, allocate resources and represent their specific area – business, user or supplier). The members must demonstrate decision-making skills, leadership and commitment throughout the project. Ideally, the members will stay in their roles throughout the project’s life.

    Joseph, the most senior manager of the department, took on the roles of executive, senior user and senior supplier for the project. He would also perform all the assurance activities for all three roles.

    Joanna, the most senior manager of the organization,...

  21. CHAPTER 15: MANAGEMENT PRODUCTS
    (pp. 188-223)

    The following list of management products is in alphabetical order.

    Created during the Initiating a Project process

    Updated during the Managing a Stage Boundary and Closing a Project processes, or – when requested by the project board via ad hoc direction – using the project’s formal change control procedures.

    Based on the executive’s request, Obe’s benefits review plan was not a separate document, but rather an additional section in the business case, listing the proposed dates and measures for all the benefits justifying the project to be assessed.

    Onawara created an extensive benefits review plan, which explained how and when each of...

  22. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 224-226)