Mobile Security

Mobile Security: A Pocket Guide

STEVEN FURNELL
Copyright Date: 2009
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 77
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5hh772
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Mobile Security
    Book Description:

    This pocket guide gives you clear and reliable guidance on how to protect the information contained in your mobile phone. Written by one of the country’s top academic experts on information security, the guide covers such topics as safeguarding data through encryption, establishing a virtual private network (VPN) to create a secure way for your staff to connect to the server on a remote device, and countering the growing threat on mobile platforms of SMS-phishing and malware. Rather than trying to ban the Blackberry, the solution proposed is for organisations to factor mobile devices into their overall information security policy. The recommendations contained in this pocket guide are designed to enable your organisation to enjoy the benefits of mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs) without sacrificing the ability to operate as safely and securely as possible.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-021-1
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 7-8)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 8-8)
  5. Table of Contents
    (pp. 9-9)
  6. CHAPTER 1: GETTING MOBILE
    (pp. 10-19)

    Mobile technology has transformed the nature of our personal and business lives, with laptop computers, Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), and mobile phones all having made the transition from being high-end executive items to everyday technologies in the mass market. As just one example, by 2005 mobile phones had already reached 80% penetration across the OECD area, with 14 countries having exceeded 100% (i.e. having more active mobile accounts than their total population).¹ Not only do more people have them, they can also do more with them. The same OECD report indicated that by 2005, more than 50% of mobile phone...

  7. CHAPTER 2: SURVIVING OUTSIDE
    (pp. 20-27)

    Chapter 1 has clearly illustrated that mobile devices are both a valuable asset and something that we need to protect. This chapter begins to provide some of the evidence of the increased risk that they introduce, and what we need to do as a consequence.

    With devices playing such an important role, and holding such sensitive information, it is natural to be concerned about what might happen to them once they are on the move. Organisations, in particular, will be concerned about what can happen to their data. Indeed, findings from a survey of 2,035 IT professionals published by Quocirca...

  8. CHAPTER 3: GETTING CONNECTED
    (pp. 28-38)

    You certainly need to be careful about what you’re connecting to when you’re on the move. You will often find yourself surrounded by a variety of other devices and networks, but it goes without saying that they will not all be equally trustworthy. Moreover, there is no requirement for devices to be physically connected to anything in order to be at risk, and indeed an increasing proportion of devices now support wireless connectivity at three levels:

    Wide area access through cellular networks such as GSM and UMTS (3G).

    Local area access through WiFi/WLAN connection.

    Personal area access via technologies, such...

  9. CHAPTER 4: ENSURING IT’S YOU
    (pp. 39-48)

    Chapter 2 has already highlighted the risks facing mobile devices in terms of loss and theft while they are on the move. However, it is worth thinking what this would actually mean from the owner’s perspective, and, of course, the answer would rather depend upon the prior steps that had been taken to protect it. For example, if your device is insured and your data is backed up (both of which may admittedly be big ifs in some cases!), then it may mean that the only tangible impact from your perspective is the inconvenience of being without it for a...

  10. CHAPTER 5: SAFEGUARDING YOUR DATA
    (pp. 49-60)

    Although much of the earlier discussion has referred to the protection of the device, this is ultimately just a means to an end. It’s actually not thedevicethat we need to protect; it’s thedata. Although the device has a financial value, it is ultimately replaceable. Meanwhile, the data may not be, and having it fall into the wrong hands may be far more costly than the loss of the device. And with even pocket-sized devices having the capacity to store gigabytes of content, that’s ample space to store a wealth of commercially sensitive and proprietary material that could...

  11. CHAPTER 6: ARE YOU A MOVING TARGET?
    (pp. 61-68)

    When considering attacks against mobile devices, a key concern is the slow but steady growth of malware (e.g. worms, viruses and Trojan horses) on mobile platforms. Given over two decades of difficulty in the desktop domain, the prospect of malware appearing on mobiles was almost inevitable as they became more advanced. Indeed, malware is the principal threat invited by the richer capabilities offered by smartphones and PDAs, as this has brought them closer to the environment already provided by fully fledged PCs. While early discussions were accompanied by claims that doom-mongers and anti-virus companies were exaggerating the threat, it is...

  12. CHAPTER 7: KNOW YOUR LIMITS
    (pp. 69-73)

    With all of the earlier chapters having emphasised the need to ensure that our devices are protected, this one now presents a caveat by highlighting that some things may not be possible. Although much of the access that we can achieve through mobile devices is comparable to our desktop systems, the security provisions are sometimes less mature. Indeed, if you are a regular user of security on a desktop system, you may find that some of it cannot be directly paralleled on your mobile device. In some cases this is due to mechanisms being presented in a different way, whereas...

  13. CONCLUSIONS
    (pp. 74-74)

    The discussion throughout the preceding chapters has clearly illustrated the power and flexibility offered by mobile devices, and the significance of the data that they can store and access as a result. Their clear benefits mean that such devices are already an inescapable part of many people’s personal and professional lives. Moreover, we can guarantee that their capability will increase as time goes on, and we will consequently be carrying an ever-more important asset that most definitely demands protection.

    As with many aspects of security, itispossible to protect our mobile devices and data, but it does not happen...

  14. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 75-77)