The Monuments and Inscriptions of Tikal--The Carved Monuments

The Monuments and Inscriptions of Tikal--The Carved Monuments: Tikal Report 33A

Christopher Jones
Linton Satterthwaite
Illustrations by William R. Coe
William R. Coe
William A. Haviland
Copyright Date: 1982
Pages: 264
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5vkd2h
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  • Book Info
    The Monuments and Inscriptions of Tikal--The Carved Monuments
    Book Description:

    This study treats the entire corpus of stone and wood monuments from the Maya site of Tikal and lesser periphery locations. Each description includes details of provenience and condition. Every carved surface is illustrated by a standardized scale drawing, supplemented in almost every case by photographs.

    eISBN: 978-1-934536-37-7
    Subjects: Archaeology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. LIST OF TABLES AND CHARTS
    (pp. vii-vii)
  4. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. vii-xii)
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
    CHRISTOPHER JONES
  6. I INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-8)

    Tikal, probably the longest-lived and largest of the Classic Maya ruins, has undergone the most intensive archaeological study ever devoted to a single Maya center. Accordingly, the monuments and inscriptions of Tikal form an extremely important body of Maya art and epigraphy. In addition to producing some of the masterpieces of Maya art—Stela 31, Altar 5, and the famous wooden lintels of Temple IV, for example—Tikal erected the earliest dated monument yet known at any of the Classic sites and continued to carve monuments after most of the others had ceased to do so. Other Maya centers famous...

  7. II TIKAL STELAE AND STELA / ALTAR PAIRS
    (pp. 9-77)

    In this section we present the carved stelae of Tikal in their numerical order. The carved altars found with the stelae are described with them, while the rest are reserved for the next section (III). A stela/altar pair is determined as such by close physical location and alignment of the two stones, with the altar in front of the stela or displaced only slightly. Such stelae and altars often form compositional and inscriptional units.

    ILLUSTRATIONS: Fig. 1a-b (drawings); Fig. 83a-b (photographs). LOCATION: North Acropolis before Str. 5D-26-lst; probably in a secondary position; upper fragment missing; no paired altar (TR. 14)....

  8. III TIKAL UNPAIRED ALTARS
    (pp. 78-82)

    Ten carved altars that were found in primary or only slightly disturbed locational association with carved stelae have been described with those stelae in the preceding section:

    Alt 1: paired with St. 4

    Alt. 2: paired with St. 5

    Alt. 5: paired with St. 16

    Alt. 6: paired with St. 19

    Alt. 7: paired with St. 24

    Alt. 8: paired with St. 20

    Alt. 9: paired with St. 21

    Alt. 10: paired with St. 22

    Alt. 11: paired with St. 11

    Alt. 14: paired with St. 30

    The designation Alt. 17 has been voided; the piece is now labeled Frag....

  9. IV TIKAL COLUMN ALTARS
    (pp. 83-85)

    Three monument stones have been placed in a separately numbered series because their conformation sets them apart from other Tikal altars: specifically their small diameter and relatively greater length, and also their tapered shape and rounded lower end. Presumably the stones were meant to be placed vertically, although a horizontal position is not precluded by their shape or carving. They are comparable to the plain column altars of Piedras Negras (Satterthwaite 1944:18) and the peripherally carved stones of Uxmal and other Puuc sites. Pollock (1980:135) distinguishes Puuc column altars from drum altars as having greater length than diameter. Like the...

  10. V TIKAL MISCELLANEOUS STONES
    (pp. 86-96)

    As noted in the Introduction, the category of Miscellaneous Stones (MS.) was created as a separate series in the field. Pieces were numbered in the order in which they were recognized as monument fragments. When certain stones were redefined as new stelae, altars, or column altars, or as fitted fragments of other monuments, their numbers were voided. The series is still a catch-all category and shows some inconsistencies in methodology. Some of the stones, for example, are probably not fragments of monuments at all. Single MS. numbers sometimes included several fragments from the same depositional contexts (and presumably from the...

  11. VI TIKAL WOODEN LINTELS
    (pp. 97-105)

    Carved wooden lintels have survived in several buildings at Tikal. Some are still in place, but most had been removed from their doorway positions, cut down to portable size, and transported out of the site long before the Tikal Project began. The detective work involved in the correct placement of the lintels is described in TR. 6, where Morley’s occasionally incorrect assignments are rectified on the basis of measurements and the discovery of chips and fragments within the rooms. Chronology on the wooden lintels is thoroughly analyzed in TR. 6 in essentially the same format followed in the present report....

  12. VII MONUMENTS FROM TIKAL-AFFILIATED SITES
    (pp. 106-116)

    In this final descriptive section, we illustrate and discuss several monuments from sites near Tikal. Three of these (Uolantun, El Encanto, and Jimbal) lie within 12 km of the center of Tikal and can reasonably be considered parts of a “greater Tikal” community mapped by the Project (TR. 12, 13). These sites are shown on maps published by Puleston and Callendar (1967: Fig. 1) and Coe (1967:105-7; TR. 12:Fig. 14). We furthermore include the monuments of Ixlu, even though the site is considerably farther from Tikal than the others, because our attention was drawn to the features shared with late...

  13. VIII CONCLUSION
    (pp. 117-131)

    Several important monument fragments and many minor ones were found within the construction fills of buildings and platforms. The bulk of these pieces were located during the Gp. 5D-2 (North Acropolis and Great Plaza) excavations, which established the basis for a firm series of local time spans (TR. 14). In Table 2, we list these time spans (TS.), numbered from latest to earliest, with the corresponding monument fragments and the ceramic complexes concluded to have been current at the time of their deposition.

    The earliest piece of stone carving known from Tikal is MS. 54, a fragment of which was...

  14. REFERENCES
    (pp. 132-138)
  15. ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. None)