Tikal Reports, Numbers 1-11

Tikal Reports, Numbers 1-11: Facsimile Reissue of Original Reports Published 1958-1961

EDWIN M. SHOOK
WILLIAM R. COE
VIVIAN L. BROMAN
LINTON SATTERTHWAITE
Richard E. W. Adams
William A. Haviland
Ruben E. Reina
Aubrey S. Trik
Robert F. Carr
James E. Hazard
Copyright Date: 1986
Pages: 432
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5vkd30
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  • Book Info
    Tikal Reports, Numbers 1-11
    Book Description:

    Any consideration of ancient Mesoamerica, and more particularly the lowland Maya region, must include the great site of Tikal, Guatemala. Excavation and research were conducted at Tikal under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the government of Guatemala from 1956 through 1969. The painstaking analysis of the results of those years of fieldwork continues, and the results will be published in a projected total of 39 final reports. This volume includes facsimile editions of the first 11 numbers of the final reports, on various topics relevant to the early excavations at Tikal, carried out by the University Museum.University Museum Monograph 64

    eISBN: 978-1-934536-33-9
    Subjects: Archaeology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. None)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. None)
  3. TIKAL REPORTS—NUMBERS 1-4
    • FOREWORD
      (pp. iii-iv)
      FROELICH RAINEY

      The papers contained in this volume represent the first of a series of technical reports on the University Museum’s archaeological project at Tikal. They cover the work of the second field season under the direction of Edwin M. Shook. The first season, in 1956, was devoted to camp construction, clearing, trail cutting, and preliminary exploration.

      An archaeological project of the magnitude of that we are undertaking at Tikal is beyond the means of most institutions without the cooperation and support of a large number of organizations and individuals. We have been extremely fortunate in this respect and herewith most gratefully...

    • CONTENTS
      (pp. v-vi)
    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 1 FIELD DIRECTOR’S REPORT: THE 1956 AND 1957 SEASONS
      (pp. 1-22)
      Edwin M. Shook

      This short Report inaugurates a series of technical papers on the University Museum’s long-term archaeological campaign at the famous Maya site of Tikal, Guatemala.

      Tikal lies at the heart of the Maya area in northeastern Peten. It is the largest Maya site known, if not in extent, certainly in architectural mass and height of temples. Thus, as has often been stated, it appears to have been one of the most important centers in the entire area. It is therefore reasonable to believe that Tikal’s significance in the development of lowland Maya culture was commensurate with its size, and that extensive...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 2 EXCAVATIONS IN THE STELA 23 GROUP
      (pp. 23-60)
      William R. Coe and Vivian L Broman

      Our primary interest in the Stela 23 group was the carved monument itself, which is treated at length in Tikal Report No. 4 of this series, by Linton Satterthwaite. Originally discovered in December 1956 by two camp workmen while hunting, this outlying group was visited by the staff on their arrival the following January.

      The seven mounds, sunken courts, and supporting plaza comprising this small group will eventually be covered by our plane-table survey. However we can say that it is roughly 500 to 600 meters southwest of Temple VI (Temple of the Inscriptions). A tentative and obviously idealized plan...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 3 THE PROBLEM OF ABNORMAL STELA PLACEMENTS AT TIKAL AND ELSEWHERE
      (pp. 61-84)
      Linton Satterthwaite

      The 1957 season at Tikal revealed a highly abnormal feature in the setting-up of Stela 23 (Coe and Broman, Tikal Report No. 2). Everything was as one might expect, except for the surprising fact that the lower part of the carving, together with the plain butt, was missing. A top fragment only had been set up just as if it were a complete stela. The next new find, Stela 25, was also a top fragment only, not found erect, but obviously reshaped for resetting (Shook 1957, p. 45). A survey of previously known Tikal stelae shows that large top or...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 4 FIVE NEWLY DISCOVERED CARVED MONUMENTS AT TIKAL AND NEW DATA ON FOUR OTHERS
      (pp. 85-150)
      Linton Satterthwaite

      The potential value of new monument materials is enhanced when the quantity is considerable and when they take their place among others already known at a site important in other respects. The Museum’s Tikal Project seasons of 1956–1957 raised the total of carved stelae by 19% and of firmly dated stelae by 25%, the increments being to the previously known series of early as well as late periods. The major purpose of this paper is to give a prompt account of the new data, monument by monument. Considered in context, they invite comparative treatments from several points of view,...

  4. TIKAL REPORTS—NUMBERS 5-10
    • Middle Matter
      (pp. None)
    • CONTENTS
      (pp. None)
    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 5 TIKAL: NUMERATION, TERMINOLOGY, AND OBJECTIVES
      (pp. 1-14)
      Edwin M. Shook and William R. Coe

      There is, we feel, a decided need to put on record the fundamentals of the system, procedural and terminological, which has been developed and adopted since the inception of our work at Tikal. A statement such as this is not intended in any sense as a manual but but is rather to indicate to the reader the context in which data are gathered and handled, and the manner, and objectives, in which they are published.

      From the beginning there has been total agreement as to the obligation to publish promptly in technical fashion both the results of excavations and other...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 6 THE CARVED WOODEN LINTELS OF TIKAL
      (pp. 15-112)
      William R. Coe and Edwin M. Shook

      Much has been written on the extraordinary carved lintels of Tikal. Throughout this considerable literature one encounters arguments and corrections as to which structures and doorways the various lintels, long removed from the site, originally pertained. And despite attention given in past years to locally surviving carved lintels, two partially intact ones did remain to be recorded.

      Our purposes in this paper are to put on record previously unillustrated carved lintels and to assign to their original locations at Tikal the groups of whole and fragmentary lintel beams to be found in the Basel Museum für Völkerkunde, in the British...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 7 TEMPLE I (STR. 5D-1): POST-CONSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES
      (pp. 113-148)
      Richard E. W. Adams and Aubrey S. Trik

      One of the many aims of further study and excavation at Tikal is to shed light on the occupation and intermittent activities there from the close of the Classic Period to the reappearance of the site in modern historical reference. It is quite possible that the information so acquired will not only help to fill a void in the history of Tikal, but, when related to other archaeological evidence, will also contribute materially to the understanding of the forces and events which influenced and accompanied the breakdown of the once vigorous ceremonial center.

      The latest known dated monument at Tikal...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 8 MISCELLANEOUS INVESTIGATIONS: EXCAVATION NEAR FRAGMENT 1 OF STELA 17, WITH OBSERVATIONS ON STELA P34 AND MISCELLANEOUS STONE 25; EXCAVATION OF STELA 25: FRAGMENT 1; EXCAVATION OF STELA 27; EXCAVATION OF STELA 28, FRAGMENT 1
      (pp. 149-170)
      Linton Satterthwaite, Vivian L. Broman and William A. Haviland

      Location.Site map, square 5E (Tikal Report No. 11), northwest corner, a few meters north of base of a steep slope leading down from the East Plaza to an area of outcroppings of bedrock, called by Morley a “lower terrace on the southern slope of the north ravine.” The known large upper fragment of Stela 17 was found a little to the west of the base of a pronounced bulge in the contour lines depicting this slope, evidently the ruin of a stairway leading down from a gap between the parapet-like strs. 5E-29 and 5E-30 at the edge of the...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 9 THE MOUNDS AND MONUMENTS AT XUTILHA, PETEN, GUATEMALA
      (pp. 171-212)
      Linton Satterthwaite

      Xutilha is a “new” ruin reported to personnel of Exploración de Guatemala, a subsidiary of Signal Oil and Gas Company, and first investigated by Richard L. Hester and Spencer C. Morris, of the company, in 1957. It lies 9.3m. west and slightly south of San Luis, in the archaeologically little-known southeast portion of the Peten. Though a small site, they found twelve stelae, at least seven of them carved, and a fairly complex system of stone-faced platform architecture. As we shall develop later on, these probably pertain to a Late Classic occupation, yet there is no visible sign of use...

    • TIKAL REPORT NO. 10 THE ABANDONMENT OF PRIMICIAS BY ITZA OF SAN JOSE, GUATEMALA, AND SOCOTZ, BRITISH HONDURAS
      (pp. 213-226)
      Ruben E. Reina

      Lying in the lowlands of Guatemala and British Honduras are two Indian communities which were the subjects of a short field study in the summer of 1958. The ancestors of the present-day inhabitants were people of obscure origin who lived among the Maya in Yucatan in Post-Classic times. In the late seventeenth century the Spaniards succeeded in stamping a large portion of their world view and traditions upon these people. Now these communities, which possess a mixed culture, once more are suffering the pangs of change.

      It is known that the inhabitants of both San Jose and Socotz are culturally...

  5. TIKAL REPORT NO. 11 MAP OF THE RUINS OF TIKAL, EL PETEN, GUATEMALA
    (pp. i-36)
    Robert F. Carr and James E. Hazard

    Tikal, the ruins of the largest ceremonial “city” of the Maya civilization, is located in the northeastern sector of the Department of Peten, Guatemala, about forty-three kilometers in a straight line northeast of Flores, the modern departmental capital. The extent of the ancient “city” of Tikal is not known certainly even today, after mapping the central area of sixteen square kilometers and exploring beyond the surveyed zone. This great Maya center, abandoned for nearly a millennium, lies virtually hidden beneath the dense canopy of a tropical rain-forest. The mapping of its crumbling and buried remains-houses, temples, palaces, plazas, ballcourts, reservoirs,...