Nature Crime

Nature Crime: How We're Getting Conservation Wrong

ROSALEEN DUFFY
Copyright Date: 2010
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 288
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5vkt2w
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  • Book Info
    Nature Crime
    Book Description:

    In this impressively researched, alarming book, Rosaleen Duffy investigates the world of nature conservation, arguing that the West's attitude to endangered wildlife is shallow, self-contradictory, and ultimately very damaging. Analyzing the workings of the black-market wildlife industry, Duffy points out that illegal trading is often the direct result of Western consumer desires, from coltan for cellular phones to exotic meats sold in London street markets. She looks at the role of ecotourism, showing how Western travelers contribute-often unwittingly-to the destruction of natural environments. Most strikingly, she argues that the imperatives of Western-style conservation often result in serious injustice to local people, who are branded as "problems" and subject to severe restrictions on their way of life and even extrajudicial killings.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-15435-1
    Subjects: Environmental Science, Business, Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. vi-viii)
  4. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-14)

    This World Wide Fund for Nature fundraising leaflet for tiger conservation was circulated in November 2009. It neatly communicates the problem: wildlife is under threat and we need to act urgently. Conservation non-governmental organizations (NGOs) like World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and Conservation International tell us that the loss of wildlife is one of the most important challenges facing our planet, that we are facing an extinction crisis to rival the end of the dinosaurs. We fear that some of the world’s most iconic species will disappear from the earth forever, that future generations will not be able to...

  7. CHAPTER ONE THE INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE TRADE
    (pp. 15-44)

    All over the world wildlife is consumed as food, medicine and clothing. I have often flicked through menus and seen shark’s fin soup or bird’s nest soup and wondered if it contains real shark fins and real bird’s nests. If the restaurant does use these ingredients then I wondered where the chef gets them from, and how these exotic delicacies were harvested. One place that bird’s nests are collected is Thailand; in the limestone outcrops between Phuket and Krabi I have watched the collectors climb up precarious bamboo poles tied to the cliff sides. But I did not know what...

  8. CHAPTER TWO GLOBAL ACTION, LOCAL COSTS
    (pp. 45-78)

    Seahorses are a favourite sea creature, but the international trade in dried and live seahorses is endangering them in the wild. Some 90 per cent of trade in seahorse specimens is for Traditional Chinese Medicine; they are also sold dried as curios and as live animals for commercial aquariums or as pets. Under CITES this trade is permitted as long as the producer country can prove that trade in seahorses is sustainable and does not endanger the animal in the wild. But the seahorse trade draws in all the countries that produce seahorses, including Vietnam, Australia, Mexico, Indonesia and Sri...

  9. CHAPTER THREE WILDLIFE WARS: POACHING AND ANTI POACHING
    (pp. 79-112)

    In May 2008 I was in the Okavango Delta in Botswana. We picked up a woman and her grandchild to give them a ride from the town of Maun to their settlement near village of Ditshiping and the Daunara veterinary fence checkpoint. They lived in an area known as NG32, half of which was leased to two safari lodges for photographic tourism and to a sport hunting operator. In the middle of nowhere, the woman insisted that we stop: she had spotted a dead honey badger lying by the roadside. Closer inspection revealed it had been freshly killed by a...

  10. CHAPTER FOUR RHINO HORN, IVORY AND THE TRADE BAN CONTROVERSY
    (pp. 113-154)

    1989 WAS A YEAR OF momentous change: the world was fundamentally reorganized as the Soviet Union collapsed and the traditional Cold War divides of East versus West suddenly disappeared. 1989 was also a year of momentous change in conservation: it was the year of the ivory ban, one of the most important and controversial decisions of the twentieth century. The decision to ban the ivory trade was taken at the international level, but it is one of the best examples of how conservation rules can suddenly change the ways people can manage and use wildlife. The ban meant that a...

  11. CHAPTER FIVE GUERRILLAS TO GORILLAS: BLOOD DIAMONDS AND COLTAN
    (pp. 155-186)

    As I sat in the Travellers Rest hotel near Kisoro in Uganda, an American tourist said to me, ‘Seeing the gorillas is amazing – it will change who you areforever.’ I was mentally preparing myself for a challenging hike the next day to see the rare mountain gorillas in the Nkuringo section of the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. This was not the first time tourists had said this to me. Perhaps there is something special about gorillas, something that touches us all, something that changes us. But undertaking a trip to see the mountain gorillas is not for the faint-hearted....

  12. CHAPTER SIX TOURIST SAVIOURS
    (pp. 187-216)

    Tourists are often presented as the potential saviours of wildlife, precisely because so many of us will pay to travel halfway across the world to see animals in their natural habitats. But the role of tourists is very complicated, and they can be involved in the illegal trade in endangered species either as willing participants or as unwitting traffickers.

    The case of abalone in Australia is very revealing. I was once greeted there with the curious sight of a group of tourists carrying very large polystyrene cooler boxes back onto their tour us. Curiosity got the better of me and...

  13. CONCLUSION
    (pp. 217-224)

    Billions of dollars are spent on saving species and habitats every year, but wildlife still appears to be in decline all over the world. This book started with a question: why is it that global conservation policies do not always achieve the desired effect? The answer lies in the failure to see conservation in its global context. This means that we focus on proximate causes of wildlife loss. Rather than tackling the ways demand for wildlife products is created and sustained by the wealthy world, conservation focuses on enforcement, coercion and regulation, which can have a negative and unjust impact...

  14. NOTES
    (pp. 225-242)
  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 243-252)
  16. INDEX
    (pp. 253-258)