Baghdad

Baghdad

TRANSLATED AND EDITED BY Reuven Snir
FOREWORD BY Roger Allen
AFTERWORD BY Abdul Kader El Janabi
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: Harvard University Press
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt6wppcd
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  • Book Info
    Baghdad
    Book Description:

    Baghdad: The City in Verse captures the essence of life lived in one of the world's enduring metropolises. This unusual anthology offers original translations of 170 Arabic poems from Bedouin, Muslim, Christian, Kurdish, and Jewish poets--most for the first time in English--from Baghdad's founding in the eighth century to the present day.

    eISBN: 978-0-674-72648-2
    Subjects: Language & Literature, History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-xx)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. XXI-xxvi)
    Roger Allen

    Baghdad, fabled residence of Harun al-Rashid inOne Thousand and One Nightsand now the capital of Iraq, was a purpose-built city constructed by the newly victorious Abbasid family, who assumed the Islamic Caliphate after the defeat of their predecessors in that function, the Umayyads. The Caliph al-Mansur initiated plans for the building project in 758, and actual construction started in 762 at the site where the twin rivers of Mesopotamia, the Tigris and Euphrates, come closest together in their joint journey to the South-East and the gulf. The plan called for a city in the form of a circle,...

  4. Preface
    (pp. XXVII-xxxii)
  5. Translator’s Note
    (pp. XXXIII-xxxviii)
  6. Introduction
    (pp. 1-52)

    “Poetry and Baghdad are indivisible, flowing together. One reflects, then feeds the other and so on,” writes contemporary Baghdadi poet Abdul Kader El Janabi (b. 1944) in his afterword: “The very nature of Baghdad strikes the match that ignites the poetic imagination of the Iraqis, and in a sense, of poets in the Arab world.” In the late 1920s, historian Reuben Levy wrote that even in the storied East there are few cities that hold the imagination like Baghdad, “whose annals should be sought not in the humdrum narratives of the scribe but in the unfettered imagery of poet or...

  7. Muti‘ ibn Iyas (704–85)
    (pp. 53-54)
  8. ‘Abd Allah ibn al-Mubarak (736–97)
    (pp. 55-55)
  9. Anon.
    (pp. 56-56)
  10. Anon.
    (pp. 57-57)
  11. Anon.
    (pp. 58-58)
  12. Anon.
    (pp. 59-59)
  13. Anon.
    (pp. 60-60)
  14. Anon.
    (pp. 61-61)
  15. Anon.
    (pp. 62-62)
  16. Anon.
    (pp. 63-63)
  17. al-‘Abbas ibn al-Ahnaf (750–809)
    (pp. 64-65)
  18. Harun al-Rashid (763–809)
    (pp. 66-66)
  19. Shamsa (eighth century)
    (pp. 67-67)
  20. Anon.
    (pp. 68-69)
  21. Anon.
    (pp. 70-70)
  22. Mansur al-Namari (?–809)
    (pp. 71-71)
  23. Ashja‘ al-Sulami (?–810)
    (pp. 72-72)
  24. Abu Nuwas (al-Hasan ibn Hani al-Hakami) (747–62–813–15)
    (pp. 73-75)
  25. ‘Inan (eighth century)
    (pp. 76-76)
  26. ‘Amr ibn ‘Abd al-Malik al-Warraq (?–815)
    (pp. 77-79)
  27. Tahir ibn al-Husayn al-Khuza‘i (776–822)
    (pp. 80-80)
  28. ‘Ali ibn Jabala al-Ansari (known as al-‘Akawwak) (776–828)
    (pp. 81-81)
  29. Ishaq al-Khuraymi (?–829)
    (pp. 82-85)
  30. Ishaq al-Mawsili (767–850)
    (pp. 86-86)
  31. Al-Husayn ibn al-Dahhak (778–870)
    (pp. 87-89)
  32. ‘Abd Allah ibn Tahir (798–844)
    (pp. 90-91)
  33. ‘Umara ibn ‘Aqil (798–853)
    (pp. 92-94)
  34. ‘Ali ibn al-Jahm (804–63)
    (pp. 95-100)
  35. ‘Abd Allah ibn Muhammad al-Bafi (?–893)
    (pp. 101-101)
  36. Ibn Dust (ninth century)
    (pp. 102-102)
  37. Abu Muhammad al-Hasan ibn Ahmad al-Brujardi (ninth century)
    (pp. 103-103)
  38. al-Walid ibn ‘Ubayd Allah al-Buhturi (820–97)
    (pp. 104-104)
  39. Ibn al-Rumi (836–96)
    (pp. 105-109)
  40. Adam ibn ‘Abd al-‘Aziz al-Umawi (ninth century)
    (pp. 110-110)
  41. Abu al-‘Aliya (ninth century)
    (pp. 111-111)
  42. ‘Ali ibn Abi Hashim (tenth century)
    (pp. 112-112)
  43. ‘Abd Allah ibn al-Mu‘tazz (861–909)
    (pp. 113-115)
  44. Muhammad ibn Dawud al-Isfahani (868–909)
    (pp. 116-116)
  45. ‘Ubayd Allah ibn ‘Abd Allah ibn Tahir (?–913)
    (pp. 117-117)
  46. ‘Ali ibn al-Husayn al-Wasiti (?–919)
    (pp. 118-118)
  47. al-Husayn ibn Mansur al-Hallaj (858–922)
    (pp. 119-120)
  48. Abu ‘Abd Allah Ibrahim ibn Muhammad Niftawayhi (858–935)
    (pp. 121-121)
  49. Anon. (tenth century)
    (pp. 122-122)
  50. Anon. (tenth century)
    (pp. 123-123)
  51. Ibn al-Tammar al-Wasiti (tenth century)
    (pp. 124-124)
  52. ‘Ali ibn Muhammad al-Tanukhi (892–953)
    (pp. 125-125)
  53. Mansur ibn Kayaghlagh (?–960)
    (pp. 126-126)
  54. Abu Ishaq al-Sabi (925–94)
    (pp. 127-127)
  55. Abu al-Hasan ‘Ali ibn ‘Abd al-‘Aziz al-Jurjani (928–1002)
    (pp. 128-129)
  56. al-Sharif al-Radi (930–77)
    (pp. 130-130)
  57. al-Tahir ibn al-Muzaffar ibn Tahir al-Khazin (tenth century?)
    (pp. 131-131)
  58. ‘Ali ibn al-Faraj al-Shafi‘i (tenth century?)
    (pp. 132-132)
  59. Muhammad ibn ‘Abd Allah al-Salami (947–1002)
    (pp. 133-133)
  60. Ma‘dan al-Taghlibi (eleventh century)
    (pp. 134-134)
  61. Abu Sa‘d Muhmmad ibn ‘Ali ibn Khalaf al-Nayramani (?–1023)
    (pp. 135-136)
  62. ‘Ali ibn Zurayq Abu al-Hasan al-Baghdadi (?–1029)
    (pp. 137-139)
  63. Abu Muhammad ‘Abd al-Wahhab al-Maliki (?–1031)
    (pp. 140-141)
  64. al-Sharif al-Murtada (965–1044)
    (pp. 142-142)
  65. Abu al-‘Ala’ al-Ma‘arri (973–1058)
    (pp. 143-146)
  66. Abu al-Ma‘ali (1028–85)
    (pp. 147-147)
  67. Abu al-Fadl ibn Muhammad al-Khazin al-Katib (?–1131)
    (pp. 148-148)
  68. Usama ibn Munqidh (1095–1188)
    (pp. 149-149)
  69. Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Shumay‘a al-Baghdadi (thirteenth century)
    (pp. 150-150)
  70. Muhyi al-Din ibn al-‘Arabi (1165–1240)
    (pp. 151-152)
  71. Majd al-Din Husayn ibn al-Dawami (thirteenth century)
    (pp. 153-153)
  72. al-Majd al-Nashabi (?–1259)
    (pp. 154-154)
  73. Taqi al-Din ibn Abi al-Yusr (1193–1273)
    (pp. 155-155)
  74. Sa‘di Shirazi (1219–94)
    (pp. 156-158)
  75. Shams al-Din Muhammad ibn ‘Abd Allah al-Kufi (1226–76)
    (pp. 159-159)
  76. Shams al-Din Mahmud ibn Ahmad al-Hashimi al-Hanafi (thirteenth century)
    (pp. 160-165)
  77. Abu al-Khayr ‘Abd al-Rahman Zayn al-Din al-Suwaydi (1722–86)
    (pp. 166-166)
  78. ‘Abd al-Ghani al-Jamil (1780–1863)
    (pp. 167-170)
  79. Shihab al-Din Abu al-Thana’ Mahmud al-Alusi (1803–54)
    (pp. 171-172)
  80. ‘Abd al-Ghaffar al-Akhras al-Mawsili (1805–72)
    (pp. 173-173)
  81. Radi al-Qazwini (1819–68)
    (pp. 174-174)
  82. ‘Abd al-Hamid al-Shawi (1828–98)
    (pp. 175-176)
  83. Ahmad al-Shawi (1844–99)
    (pp. 177-178)
  84. Jamil Sidqi al-Zahawi (1863–1936)
    (pp. 179-181)
  85. Ahmad Shawqi (1868–1932)
    (pp. 182-182)
  86. Hafiz Ibrahim (1871–1932)
    (pp. 183-183)
  87. Ma‘ruf al-Rusafi (1875–1945)
    (pp. 184-188)
  88. Iliyya Abu Madi (1889–1957)
    (pp. 189-189)
  89. Anwar Sha’ul (1904–84)
    (pp. 190-191)
  90. Murad Michael (1906–86)
    (pp. 192-193)
  91. Mir Basri (1911–2006)
    (pp. 194-195)
  92. Mishil Haddad (1919–96)
    (pp. 196-196)
  93. Nizar Qabbani (1923–98)
    (pp. 197-200)
  94. Nazik al-Mala’ika (1923–2007)
    (pp. 201-202)
  95. Ibrahim Ovadia (1924–2006)
    (pp. 203-204)
  96. ‘Ali Sidqi ‘Abd al-Qadir (1924–2008)
    (pp. 205-206)
  97. Badr Shakir al-Sayyab (1926–64)
    (pp. 207-210)
  98. Buland al-Haydari (1926–96)
    (pp. 211-217)
  99. ‘Abd al-Wahhab al-Bayyati (1926–99)
    (pp. 218-224)
  100. Shadhil Taqa (1929–74)
    (pp. 225-225)
  101. Adonis (1930–)
    (pp. 226-243)
  102. Muhammad Jamil Shalash (1930–)
    (pp. 244-246)
  103. Salah ‘Abd al-Sabur (1931–81)
    (pp. 247-248)
  104. Sa‘di Yusuf (1934–)
    (pp. 249-252)
  105. Ahmad ‘Abd al-Mu‘ti Hijazi (1935–)
    (pp. 253-254)
  106. Sadiq al-Sa’igh (1938–)
    (pp. 255-258)
  107. Samih al-Qasim (1939–)
    (pp. 259-260)
  108. Fadil al-‘Azzawi (1940–)
    (pp. 261-265)
  109. Sami Mahdi (1940–)
    (pp. 266-266)
  110. May Muzaffar (1940–)
    (pp. 267-267)
  111. Mahmud Darwish (1941–2008)
    (pp. 268-269)
  112. Su‘ad al-Sabah (1942–)
    (pp. 270-270)
  113. Sharif al-Rubay‘i (1943–97)
    (pp. 271-271)
  114. Sargon Boulus (1944–2007)
    (pp. 272-278)
  115. Abdul Kader El Janabi (1944–)
    (pp. 279-284)
  116. Faruq Juwayda (1945–)
    (pp. 285-286)
  117. ‘Ali Ja‘far al-‘Allaq (1945–)
    (pp. 287-288)
  118. ‘Abd al-Rahman Touhmazi (1946–)
    (pp. 289-290)
  119. Bushra al-Bustani (1950–)
    (pp. 291-291)
  120. Ronny Someck (1951–)
    (pp. 292-293)
  121. Wafa’ ‘Abd al-Razzaq (1952–)
    (pp. 294-294)
  122. Ahlam Mustaghanimi (1953–)
    (pp. 295-296)
  123. Ibrahim Zaydan (1960–) and Qays Majid al-Mawla (196?–)
    (pp. 297-299)
  124. ‘Abid ‘Ali al-Rammahi (1967–)
    (pp. 300-301)
  125. Sinan Antoon (1967–)
    (pp. 302-305)
  126. Dalya Riyad (1970–)
    (pp. 306-307)
  127. Manal al-Shaykh (1971–)
    (pp. 308-308)
  128. Afterword Being a Baghdadi Poet: A Testimony
    (pp. 309-312)
    Abdul Kader El Janabi

    Poetry and Baghdad are indivisible, flowing together. One reflects then feeds the other, and so on. There is a relationship of city with logos, poetry with space, and it is no accident that Baghdad has produced hundreds of poets and few prose writers. The very essence of Baghdad speaks: its geographical position; the weather, too cold or too hot; Tigris River with its moonlit banks and dark floods breaking hearts into words; al-Rashid street with its metal balconies and stone columns stretched out for miles like Noah’s ark preserving a cultural diversity; the old cafés and the markets of dawn;...

  129. References
    (pp. 315-328)
  130. Index of Poets
    (pp. 329-332)
  131. Index of Titles
    (pp. 333-339)