Wildlife of the Caribbean

Wildlife of the Caribbean

Herbert A. Raffaele
James W. Wiley
Copyright Date: 2014
Pages: 304
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt6wpz6k
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  • Book Info
    Wildlife of the Caribbean
    Book Description:

    This is the first comprehensive illustrated guide to the natural world of the Caribbean islands. It contains 600 vivid color images featuring 451 species of plants, birds, mammals, fish, seashells, and much more. While the guide primarily looks at the most conspicuous and widespread species among the islands, it also includes rarely seen creatures-such as the Rhinoceros Iguana and Cuban Solenodon-giving readers a special sense of the region's diverse wildlife.

    Each species is represented by one or more color photos or illustrations; details regarding its identification, status, and distribution; and interesting aspects of its life history or relationship to humans. In addition, an introductory section focuses on the unique characteristics of the Caribbean's fauna and flora, the threats faced by both, and some of the steps being taken to sustain the area's extraordinary natural heritage.

    Wildlife of the Caribbeanis the essential field guide for learning about the living wonders in this area of the world.

    The only guide of its kind for the Caribbean islands600 detailed color images feature 451 amazing speciesStraightforward descriptions suitable for general audienceCompact size makes the guide easy to carry

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5169-0
    Subjects: Zoology, Biological Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-2)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 3-3)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. 4-4)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 4-5)

    The primary goal of this guide is to promote an interest in the natural world of the Caribbean islands. The book is intended to serve as a practical guide for local people and tourists alike. We presume its users have no particular experience or expertise with nature, so, to make identification easier, illustrations or photographs accompany every species description. In some cases, particularly plants, more than one picture is provided.

    Aid in identification of commonly encountered species is a primary objective, an aim we supplement with text that attempts to highlight interesting facts about the species presented. By promoting interest...

  5. THE ISLANDS
    (pp. 8-16)

    The Caribbean islands fall into several groups. The four largest islands—Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, and Puerto Rico—comprise the Greater Antilles; all are long and narrow and stretch from east to west. To the north of the Greater Antilles are the Bahamas, or Bahamas Bank, a cluster of more than seven hundred small, low-lying islands and cays, which includes the Turks and Caicos. To the east of Puerto Rico are the Virgin Islands, followed by the southward-arching Lesser Antilles, stretching from Anguilla in the north to Grenada in the south.

    The islands of the Caribbean are characteristically warm, sunny, and...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS AND CONSERVATION
    (pp. 17-28)

    High atop Mt. Misery among the rain and fog, the Mountain Blacksmith wailed away to no avail, calling and calling but evoking no response. As the rain grew heavier and the wind stronger, even this hearty soul gave up his familiar refrain, heard on the mountain from time immemorial, to shelter in a dense thicket as protection from the oncoming storm. But this was not just the kind of storm so common to these inhospitable climes, the kind that had given this formidable mountain its name. This was one of the great tempests of the century, sweeping up from the...

  7. Species Accounts
    • Terrestrial Life
    • Marine Life
      • CONSERVING THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT OF THE CARIBBEAN AND THE WORLD: A GLOBAL IMPERATIVE
        (pp. 230-231)
        FREUNDEL STUART

        The maritime area of Barbados is over 431 times its landmass. Therefore, sustainability as a small island development state cannot be addressed without a special and priority focus on the marine environment or the ʺblue economy.ʺ The survival of the Earth ocean system is crucial.

        I share the emerging consensus among the international scientific community that through the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors we are at high risk of causing Earthʹs next significant extinction event in the oceans.

        In spite of this prognosis and the alarming reality of an ever narrowing window of opportunity for corrective action, scientists remain optimistic...

      • MARINE MAMMALS
        (pp. 232-235)
      • MARINE REPTILES
        (pp. 236-237)
      • MARINE FISH
        (pp. 238-267)
      • MARINE PLANTS AND INVERTEBRATES
        (pp. 268-279)
      • SEASHELLS (MOLLUSKS)
        (pp. 280-291)
  8. REFERENCES AND ADDITIONAL READING
    (pp. 292-295)
  9. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 296-296)
  10. PHOTOGRAPH, ILLUSTRATION, AND TEXT EDIT CREDITS
    (pp. 297-299)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 300-304)