Constructing the Criollo Archive

Constructing the Criollo Archive

Antony Higgins
Copyright Date: 2000
Published by: Purdue University Press
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt6wq23w
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Constructing the Criollo Archive
    Book Description:

    This book constitutes an attempt to theorize the process of the emergence, in eighteenth-century New Spain, of a position of intellectual subjectivity differentiated from that established by the regime of spa imperial authority. The principal concern has been to trace how certain groups of criollo intellectuals try to construct such discourses, paradoxically, out of the framework of available European systems of knowledge and representation. In this fashion, it was sought to discern the outline of an ideological program for criollo political and cultural hegemony in the eighteenth century

    eISBN: 978-1-61249-108-0
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Preface
    (pp. ix-xvi)
  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  5. Introduction
    (pp. 1-20)

    One of the key issues raised by contemporary criticism and theory has concerned the philosophical category of the subject. This line of investigation has focused upon the figure that grounds the epistemology and value system of modernity, as it has been articulated in Western Europe, sometimes producing consideration of its trajectory with respect to non-European geographicalcultural spaces within the dynamics of imperialism.¹ Significant moments in the interrogation of the category of the subject are Martin Heidegger’s critique of phenomenological thought, and the more recent critical projects of Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Michel Foucault, which, in the Anglo-American world, have...

  6. Part 1 Juan José de Eguiara y Eguren and the Bibliotheca Mexicana

    • Chapter One Framing the Criollo Archive
      (pp. 23-44)

      TheBibliotheca Mexicanais the first attempt to organize systematically a heterogeneous range of authors and texts into the form of a Mexican intellectual tradition. It is both product and agent of the process through which a sense of shared identity and interests comes to be envisaged in New Spain. Written in Latin, it was compiled under the directorship of a cleric and high-ranking educator at the Real y Pontificia Universidad de México, Juan José de Eguiara y Eguren. Organized alphabetically,¹ the work was primarily intended to be a comprehensive biobibliography, detailing the individuals, texts, and institutions of importance within...

    • Chapter Two Supplementing Authority: The Prologues to the Bibliotheca Mexicana
      (pp. 45-85)

      While theAprilis Dialogusestablishes Mexico as a utopian site for the production of knowledge, erudition, and texts, theBibliothecaitself involves an unending quest to produce and uncover texts, and to accumulate them in a location perceived by the European intellectual subject as pure materiality, a space defined by its blackness, by an absence of discourse. Its very structure is a symptom of this problematic, since the catalogue is not of itself complete, but has to be supplemented by other documents, or palimpsests.¹ Thus, theDialogusis followed by a series of prologues in which Eguiara y Eguren plays...

    • Chapter Three The Fragmentary Archive: The Catalogue of the Bibliotheca Mexicana
      (pp. 86-106)

      TheAprilis Dialogusand other prologues to theBibliotheca Mexicanaserve to ground the position of thecriollosubject, and its knowledge. In both their formal organization and their thematics, they mobilize the contradictions that structure the thought of that subject. While they serve to posit the locus of its theoretical autonomy and organicity, they simultaneously demonstrate its investment in, and tension with, the semiotic matrices of indigenous,mestizo, and Spanish cultures. The catalogue itself constitutes an attempt to impose a totalizing order over such contradictions. Nevertheless, in its very logic and structure it tends to reproduce, and exacerbate, the...

  7. Part 2 Rafael Landívar’s Rusticatio Mexicana:: Expanding the Criollo Archive

    • Chapter Four Subject, Archive, Landscape
      (pp. 109-166)

      Eguiara y Eguren’sBibliotheca Mexicanaconstitutes a limitpoint in the hegemony of the episteme and practices of scholasticism in New Spain. At the time of theBibliotheca’s publication, the structure out of which Eguiara worked was beginning to show cracks, and was giving way to an emergent syncretic intellectual schema at the most prestigious Jesuit colleges in the viceroyalty. By the middle of the eighteenth century, the materialist and epistemological ideologies of secularizing thinkers were selectively being incorporated into the teaching of philosophy at such institutions of higher learning, producing what Mexican intellectual historiography has referred to as “eclecticism.”¹

      At...

    • Chapter Five After the Sublime: The Rationalization of Colonial Space
      (pp. 167-210)

      In theRusticatio Mexicanathe sublime serves as a medium for thinking through the problem of mapping that which is not easily grasped and incorporated into Western semiosis. At the same time, it stages a drama through which the position of acriollosubject of literary discourse and knowledge is stabilized. Nevertheless, Landívar’s labor does not conclude with the establishment of an irreducible, natural force as the metaphysical core of acriollopatriotism. Rather, over the course of the next eight books of theRusticatio Mexicana,he attempts to chart a variety of spheres of human activity in which the...

    • Chapter Six Framing American Heterogeneity
      (pp. 211-232)

      In the final four books of theRusticatio Mexicana,and in an appendix,¹ Landívar shifts his focus away from the depiction of a diversified and rationalized economy founded on the calculated exploitation of American materiality. The subject installed through the dynamic of the natural sublime, and who has been posited as the agent of the economic order of the various regions of Mexico and Guatemala following the removal of the discursive and institutional matrix of the Jesuit order, will now be deployed in the task of further shaping the heterogeneity of American nature and cultures into a new totality. Books...

  8. Conclusion
    (pp. 233-240)

    This book constitutes an attempt to theorize the process of the emergence, in eighteenth-century New Spain and Guatemala, of a position of intellectual subjectivity differentiated from that established by the regime of Spanish imperial authority. My principal concern has been to trace how certain groups ofcriollointellectuals try to construct such discourses, paradoxically, out of the framework of available European systems of knowledge and representation. In this fashion, I have sought to discern the outline of an ideological program forcriollopolitical and cultural hegemony in the eighteenth century.

    My analysis of this process is predicated on a conceptualization...

  9. Notes
    (pp. 241-262)
  10. Bibliography
    (pp. 263-276)
  11. Index
    (pp. 277-286)
  12. Back Matter
    (pp. 287-287)