The Value of Hawai'i 2

The Value of Hawai'i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions

AIKO YAMASHIRO
NOELANI GOODYEAR-KAʹŌPUA
Copyright Date: 2014
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt6wqsn1
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  • Book Info
    The Value of Hawai'i 2
    Book Description:

    How can more of us protect and create waiwai, value, for coming generations? Continuing the conversation ofThe Value of Hawai'i: Knowing the Past, Shaping the Future, this new collection gathers together fresh voices sharing their inspiring work in farming, government, voyaging, water rights, archaeology, gender advocacy, education, business, community health, art, immigration, and more to enhance the present and future value of Hawai'i. By exploring connections to ancestors and others across our Pacific world, the contributors to this volume offer passionate and poignant visions. Their autobiographical essays will inspire readers to live consciously and lead ourselves as island people.

    eISBN: 978-0-8248-4025-9
    Subjects: Business

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  3. HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
    (pp. ix-xii)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
    Aiko Yamashiro and Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua
  5. WE ARE ISLANDERS INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-8)
    AIKO YAMASHIRO and NOELANI GOODYEAR-KAʹŌPUA

    The majestic female figure on the cover of this book is artist John “Prime” Hina’s depiction of Pele, the fiery deity who currently resides at Halema‘uma‘u on Hawai‘i Island. In his rendering, Pele holds an ‘umeke—a bowl typically used for containing food—on her right hip. The ‘umeke poi is an important symbol in Hawaiian culture. In many families across the islands, the ‘umeke has traditionally been the center of any shared meal. Once the ‘umeke is uncovered no harsh or injurious words are to be spoken, as the poi will soak up that negative energy and transfer to...

  6. ALOHA
    • TŪTŪʹS ALOHA ʹĀINA GRACE INTERGENERATIONAL WISDOM
      (pp. 11-17)
      KAMANAMAIKALANI BEAMER

      It may be a uniquely Hawaiian relationship celebrated in mo‘olelo like Kamapua‘a, La‘anuimamao, and Kamiki, which illustrate the pilina pa‘a mau (enduring love) of a tūtū wahine (grandmother) and mo‘opuna kāne (grandson). In each of these mo‘olelo, the kūpunahine are a fundamental part of the mo‘olelo as a foundation, mentor, and even akua to their mo‘opuna kāne once the kūpuna have passed into pō (the realm of spirits). In fact, as I came to better understand these mo‘olelo, I also better understood why many Hawaiian men today often recall their relationship with their tūtū as being one of the most...

    • MOTHER
      (pp. 18-20)
      FAITH PASCUA

      At night in my house when everyone should be sleeping, eyes closed, minds drifting towards wonderland,

      She’s still awake in the living room, flipping through memories of what used to be,

      She’s crying wishing her storied scrapbook past was reality again.

      She reminisces over pages of smiles; compiled accomplishments enough to fill miles of trophy cases.

      She was the original Dust Buster Dirt Devil housekeeper, Winner of the 2006 Housekeeper of the Year award.

      She remembers wanting to vacuum the red carpet something majestic;

      Floors so shiny, you could see your inner child in the reflection. She idolizes perfection.

      That...

  7. MO‘OLELO:: STORIES AND STORYTELLING
    • SO LISTEN TO ME SPOKEN ARTS AND YOUTH ACTIVISM
      (pp. 23-31)
      LYZ SOTO

      Slam poetry is a competitive form of spoken word started in the 1980s in Chicago by Marc Smith, a poet and construction worker, who was looking for a way to get everyday people excited about poetry. At its most basic, slam poetry is an open mic event with rules and a time limit. In Hawai‘i, it has often developed a separate sense of place defined by a desire for cultural self-definition within colonial realities that resist this type of exploration. In other words, the poems written and performed by youth from Hawai‘i can be quite different from those heard in...

    • NO SEED LEFT UNTURNED GENDER AND MO‘OLELO
      (pp. 32-41)
      JAMAICA HEOLIMELEIKALANI OSORIO

      If the saying is true, that “history is recorded by the victor,” women of color are history’s biggest losers. Racism, colonization, sexism, and the controlled institutionalized nature of education has developed a culture of silencing any threats to the scripted hegemonic, colonial narrative. That is to say, communities of power control what is “normal” by undermining the very existence of alternative narratives.

      Imagine then, the potential power we might wield by harnessing our mo‘olelo and using them as a weapon against this single-sided writing of history. Hawaiians have long been constrained to one-dimensional, lackluster, and often disrespectful caricatures. There are...

    • WE, THE STAR KEEPERS PRIVATE EDUCATION
      (pp. 42-48)
      RYAN OISHI

      For the past two years, I have found myself in a perfect storm of weddings. At the age of thirty, the biological clocks of my high school friends seem to have aligned with the certainty of a tidal chart. Upon this nuptial tempest, I have been cast to the shores of Boston and San Francisco, Richmond and the North Shore of O‘ahu, and nearly every hotel in Waikīkī.

      These weddings are a time of reconnecting. Stories from our high school days at Punahou are dusted off and trotted out with great relish. And they are also a time of looking...

    • EYES OF THE NIGHT LIGHTS
      (pp. 49-51)
      MAILANI NEAL

      On the slopes of the Mauna Kea summit, the cold winds of Poli‘ahu whispered in the ear of Kia‘i, “It’s time.” Kia‘i opened his eyes to the flawless surface of Lake Waiau casting the perfect projection of the night sky. Burdened by the command given, Kia‘i rose and began to gather his ‘upena, fishing net, and waded into the glacial water towards the never-ending pattern of fish circling each other. He threw his net, encompassing and catching them perfectly, as he had done for many decades. Then, Kia‘i quickly ran the several miles to Lake Hūnā. He ran so swiftly...

    • THE WELO AND KULEANA OF MELE INTEGRITY MUSIC
      (pp. 52-59)
      KAINANI KAHAUNAELE

      While my mother, “Lady Ipo,” embarked on her Hawaiian music career at a young age, little did I know the critical role Hawaiian music would play in my own life’s work, kuleana, and passion. When it was time to start considering college and career possibilities, I wanted to work in the culinary field. A music career hadn’t even crossed my mind. Nobody went to college to be a musician. A career meant work resulting from a college education.

      I was born into a musical family and raised by my grandparents, Kanani and David Kahaunaele, great-grandmother Margaret Pānui, and a huge...

    • KALIHI CALLS STORYTELLING AND COMMUNITY HEALTH
      (pp. 60-67)
      DAWN MAHI

      I feel a visceral connection with the mountains of our home. Their cracks and crevices like folds in my heart, razor knuckles reaching for heaven; seeking taut liberation from the ocean, drawing down the sky.

      In the middle, we find our place between peaks and shoreline and beyond. During small-kid time, Hawai‘i was everything. Our island kingdom was all around everywhere and there wasn’t anything that wasn’t this. My parallel flat planet, our infinite oasis.

      When my family moved away, I didn’t know what I didn’t know. In geography class, a colonized map had been imprinted in my mind. Knowing,...

    • I AM A FARMER
      (pp. 68-69)
      UʹILANI ARASATO

      You should stop and listen,

      the ‘āina is trying to speak.

      Screaming for a voice to be heard over planning and development: can you hear it?

      Building blocks stacked on rich soils from the works of our kūpuna before us, dirt-stained hands embedded into the creases of our ‘āina: can you feel it?

      Overturned lifestyles and agreements between Ali‘i and Maka‘āinana as promised to work the land for generations to come, but you see, where is our land?

      Farmers that fight for the right to produce food for you.

      See, I am a farmer, holding strength and determination in my...

    • TELL THEM
      (pp. 70-72)
      KATHY JETNIL-KIJINER
  8. KULEANA AND DEVELOPING HAWAI‘I RESPONSIBLY
    • HONORING THE FAMILY OF KTA SUPER STORES BUSINESS
      (pp. 75-81)
      DEREK KURISU

      I started working at Taniguchi Supermarket, founded in 1916 and known today as KTA Super Stores, when I was just sixteen years old. I am a third generation (sansei) Japanese, the second son of three boys and two girls, born and raised on the Hakalau sugar plantation on the Hāmākua coast of the Big Island. I am not a family member, but the Taniguchis treat me like family. I have been employed at KTA Super Stores for forty-five years. When I started, Taniguchi Supermarket had a store in Downtown Hilo, and in Kailua-Kona, at the King Kamehameha Hotel, and had...

    • LĀNAʹIʹS COMMUNITY WEALTH LĀNA‘I FUTURES
      (pp. 82-87)
      CONSUELO AGARPAO GOUVEIA

      Being born and raised on the island of Lāna‘i is unique in itself. In fact, I was one of the last babies to be born at the hospital there in 1978. They stopped delivering babies completely in 1979, instead sending moms to Maui. The community at that time was predominantly Japanese and Hawaiian, but I am full Filipino. But there wasn’t one main group on the island of Lāna‘i; we never thought of ourselves as different ethnic groups but more as one big ‘ohana. The mom and pop shops were owned by Japanese families; Tūtū kāne and tūtū wāhine would...

    • URBANISM AS ISLAND LIVING ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN
      (pp. 88-99)
      SEAN CONNELLY

      I am from O‘ahu. Growing up, all I knew about watersheds was that the stream near my house in Kāne‘ohe was a tunnel that went to the sewage plant. At my Filipino Grandma’s house in Kalihi, the stream was down the hill at the end of the street, but too dirty to swim in so I never went. When I’d go around Honolulu, I remember thinking how ugly the buildings were. I would think, if only someone would design better buildings, maybe we could better protect O‘ahu’s natural beauty. So I decided to study architecture and urban design in college....

    • A PERSPECTIVE ON ENERGY POLICIES IN HAWAIʹI ENERGY
      (pp. 100-110)
      MAKENA COFFMAN

      I moved home to Hawai‘i in 2002 with an undergraduate degree in international relations and an ambition to work in policy. I began as a researcher for 3Point Consulting and was assigned to be a recorder in the widely publicized clash over new power lines through Mānoa or Pālolo. Among other environmental concerns, both communities were upset about the impact to view planes as well as the role that the power lines would play in facilitating more development in Honolulu. This experience introduced me to the intricacies of energy planning, ranging from the technical issues of power reliability to community...

    • A WAY WITH WASTE WASTE MANAGEMENT
      (pp. 111-118)
      HUNTER HEAIVILIN

      It is a hot summer day in the late 2000s. I am sweating in my air-conditionless truck, windows up in a futile attempt to keep the dust and smell at bay, waiting in a line of vehicles at the Waimānalo Gulch Sanitary Landfill. I have come prepared to do my civic duty and deposit some bulky materials from a long-forgotten home improvement project. In front of me, a semi-truck bucks forward as we all advance a pace towards the burial place of the detritus of O‘ahu’s population.

      As my stomach grumbles about hunger, an arm appears out of the truck...

    • THINGS YOU MISSED (OR, THE DOG-EARS, REVISITED)
      (pp. 119-121)
      DONOVAN KŪHIŌ COLLEPS

      the time i went out past the breaks at hau bush four days after you died it rained and pleny pua were jumping out of the water coming towards me reminding me when we saw this once together and you told me it’s because a shark is somewhere near by.

      My mother also had a pet shark out near the entrance to Pearl Harbor…. Some of the catch always went to Ka‘ahupūhau, her shark, which she raised from when it was small until it reached over 25 feet in length.

      Change We Must, Nana Veary

      our family god is the...

    • RECLAIMING OUR STORIES OF STRUGGLE LABOR MOVEMENT
      (pp. 122-129)
      CADE WATANABE

      “You only live once!” That was among the many sayings Grandpa liked to share.

      Grandpa was known for many things. Khaki pants with homemade sewn patches along the knees, a worn-out belt that slowly made way for a simple rope cord, blue-pocketed long-sleeve shirts and hats. Ice cream, musky after-shave, and Coke, always sipped with a straw. He was a very proud man, and like so many in his generation, he seemed to have experienced too much for one person in one lifetime. His greatest talent was using his warmth and genuine sense of care to wrangle folks in. He...

    • THE URBAN ISLAND PENDULUM ART AND URBAN YOUTH
      (pp. 130-138)
      PRIME

      Kids can smell bullshit. They feel like they’re being lied to every single day. When they’re a part of what we’re doing with our organization, 808 Urban, the struggles are real. They can see it. And they get frustrated. “Now you know how the kūpuna felt when they were fighting for this place,” I tell them. It’s like a pendulum. On one side you have progress and development, and on the other you have tradition and culture. But ultimately, I don’t think fighting is the answer. Creativity is.

      808 Urban is a collective of community cultural workers: artists, organizers, and...

    • SEDILIA
      (pp. 139-143)
      JILL YAMASAWA
    • I AM OF OCEANIA
      (pp. 144-145)
      INNOCENTA SOUND-KIKKU

      When my daughter was 12 years old, she came home one day from school, upset and confused. She couldn’t stop thinking about what her substitute teacher had told her that day: “It’s because of you people—it makes me frustrated to come to teach.” My daughter came home, asking me “what did the teacher mean by ‘you people’? Did she mean me as Chuukese? As Micronesian? Or me as someone from the Kalihi area?”

      I felt so upset for my daughter, thinking how wrong it was for a teacher to say something like this. I know many other Micronesian kids...

    • MOLOKAI STORIES, IDENTITY, AND KULEANA VIDEO PRODUCTION
      (pp. 146-152)
      MATT N. YAMASHITA

      It’s an honor to be able to say that I am the first professional filmmaker from the island of Molokai.¹ Over the past twelve years of my career I have independently produced over a hundred videos for a wide range of clients. From the windswept slopes of Kaho‘olawe to the open ocean aboard Hōkūle‘a, from building traditional stone structures in Kona to preserving native fisheries in Mo‘omomi, from fighting back shoreline developments to promoting sustainable living practices, the content of my work has been a continuous journey of understanding and celebrating life in Hawai‘i. It has also been a constant...

    • HOW WE CHOOSE OUR FOOD AND HOW OUR FOOD CHOOSES US PUBLIC HEALTH
      (pp. 153-162)
      ELISE LEIMOMI DELA CRUZ-TALBERT

      A growing body of research on eating behaviors and the industrial food system shows that our neighborhood, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity affects our diets. Looking at the contexts in which people make food choices helps to explain the unequal distribution of diet-related diseases in Hawai‘i. People often learn about health trends like the obesity and diabetes epidemics, hear that minorities and low-income populations have higher rates of these diseases, and don’t see where they fit on the graphs. Still, Hawaiians and others, friends and family, say, “I eat what I want. Don’t you think that people choose how they want...

    • FISHPONDS, FOOD, AND THE FUTURE IN OUR PAST LOKO I‘A
      (pp. 163-170)
      HIʹILEI KAWELO

      Our nonprofit, Paepae o He‘eia, has been around since 2001. We have a vision and mission you can find on our website.¹ But we like to let the place speak for itself. This pond is massive: 88 acres of water space, completely surrounded by a wall that is 7,000 linear feet long, about 1.3 miles. Our kūpuna built this pond in about two years time. It’s estimated that He‘eia Fishpond is about 800 years old and fed a community of about 2,000 people. The low estimate is that this pond was able to produce 200 lbs of fish per acre,...

  9. HUAKA‘I:: FINDING YOUR POSITION AND YOUR WAY
    • SAILING THE ANCESTRAL BRIDGES OF OCEANIC KNOWLEDGE VOYAGING
      (pp. 173-180)
      BONNIE KAHAPEʹA-TANNER

      When I was in the fourth grade, my dad got a boat so he could go fishing on the weekends. He would go out fishing with his friends, and we would go to the sandbar. We grew up out there at Ahu o Laka in Käne‘ohe Bay. Every Sunday it was the same routine: the dads would go out fishing, while the moms and the kids hung out on the sandbar. We swam and played all day. Sunburnt with sand in my bathing suit, I would go straight to sleep when we got home in the evening.

      As my sister...

    • MICRONESIAN DIASPORA(S)
      (pp. 181-187)
      EMELIHTER KIHLENG and IR

      EK:Ahmw tepin kohla Seipan oh dah ke wia? Ke doadoak?

      When you first went to Saipan what did you do? Did you work?

      IR:Ehng. Doadoak nan factory.

      Yes. I worked in a factory.

      EK:Hmm. Dah ke kin wia nan factory?

      What did you do in the factory?

      IR:Wil kopwe. Re kin dehkada likou irail kin kidohng kit, wilikada kilahng ekei, song ko, koakoadihla.

      Fold clothes. They sew the clothes and give them to us, fold them up and give them to others, like that, as it goes down.

      EK:Doadoak laud?

      Hard work?

      IR:Ehng. Apw...

    • DECOLONIZATION AND PUBLIC EDUCATION IN HAWAIʹI PUBLIC EDUCATION
      (pp. 188-196)
      TINA GRANDINETTI

      Every day in Hawai‘i, behind the red-dirt stained walls of our public schools, thousands of students participate in a tremendous exercise of cross-cultural interaction, tolerance, and understanding, between peers of different ethnic groups and varying economic backgrounds. The unfaltering routine of each morning renders invisible just how powerful this daily exchange truly is, that Hawai‘i’s public school system has long been a driving force behind our unique island culture. At one point or another, or several simultaneously, our public school system has served as an agent of American cultural imperialism, helped laborers pull themselves out of exploitative jobs, oppressed and...

    • ALTERNATIVE ECONOMIES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUTURES SETTLER COLONIALISM
      (pp. 197-206)
      DEAN ITSUJI SARANILLIO

      As a child growing up on the island of Maui, I remember my mother, Eloise Saranillio, singing a funny song to the tune of the McGuire Sisters’ 1958 hit “Sugar Time.” Changing the word “sugar” to “cabbage,” she sang, “cabbage in the morning, cabbage in the evening, cabbage at suppertime.” She told us that when she was growing up at the McGerrow plantation camp on Maui, her mother, my grandmother Masako Inouye, went on strike at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. (HC&S) sugar plantation and served as a strike captain. In 1958, International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) laborers went...

    • BACKYARD KULEANA KAUA‘I FUTURES
      (pp. 207-215)
      KEONE KEALOHA

      Aloha kākou, ‘o Keone Kealoha ko‘u inoa. I currently live and work on Kaua‘i with a non-profit, Mälama Kaua‘i, I helped found in 2006. The following is a brief history of how I came to be here, some of what I’ve learned, and where I see things going. I hope my experience can provide another facet to your worldview and a meaningful insight for your future choices.

      I was raised in California for the earliest portion of my life. At thirteen, I came to live on O‘ahu, where I attended Kamehameha through my high school years. It was there that...

    • MY JOURNEY AS AN ALLY FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE MILITARISM
      (pp. 216-223)
      ERI OURA

      In February of 2012, I traveled to Vieques and Puerto Rico for the eighth gathering of the International Women’s Network Against Militarism. Paying attention to the landscape of Puerto Rico and the struggles those women shared really taught me to think about the connections between militarism, global capitalism, and land use. There were many military installations, and the cult of corporations—McDonalds, Walmart, K-Mart, Burger King, Taco Bell, PetCo, etc.—saturated many towns, and billboards were everywhere to be seen. Tens of thousands of personnel were brought in or hired locally to work the bases, stores, and restaurants. I saw...

    • CULTIVATING FORESIGHT AND EMPOWERMENT ALTERNATIVE FUTURES
      (pp. 224-234)
      AUBREY MORGAN YEE

      Here we sit, at the outset of the twenty-first century, wirelessly connected to the world and increasingly disconnected from our communities. We have more stuff than ever before, but our generation is faced with overall worse health and fewer economic prospects than our parents and grandparents. We import over 90 percent of the food we eat in the islands, and we are losing our remaining open and productive agricultural space to continued development and housing. Hawai‘i is a place of intense natural beauty and yet Honolulu recently ranked fourth among US cities for the number of high rises crowding our...

  10. PU‘UHONUA:: CREATING SAFE AND SACRED SPACES
    • transFARMation AGRICULTURE
      (pp. 235-240)
      CHERYSE JULITTA KAUIKEOLANI SANA

      I have always loved ‘āina. Her beauty, strength, and energy raised me to be the person I am today. Early morning pinks, oranges, and yellows peeking over the Wai‘anae range reassure me that my kūpuna also experienced the same beauty. The Kaiāulu wind brushes against my body to imprint the magnitude and function of the mountains before me. The soft smell of early morning dew on fresh vegetables wakes me for the soon-to-be-intense workday of harvesting. Organically grown produce gives me energy, nutrients for my body, and a love for life itself.

      Growing up, I wanted to mälama ‘āina and...

    • TE LUMANAKI O TOKELAU I HAWAIʹI COMMUNITY EDUCATION
      (pp. 241-249)
      SANIA FAʹAMAILE BETTY P. ICKES

      February 3rd, 2010, nine a.m. Lumanaki School is in session. As Bonnie Patelesio tunes her guitar, she competes with the crowing roosters, the wind whistling through holes in the exterior wall of the hall, and the excited banter of students settling into their seats. Mas Patelesio and other teachers and parents are setting up equipment for the classes that will share the hall’s open space following the morning assembly. Mas and Bonnie belong to the declining handful of native Tokelauan-language speakers who call Hawai‘i home.² This morning, as most Saturday mornings since 2004, the husband-wife team and other native speakers...

    • THE SECOND GIFT
      (pp. 250-253)
      BRANDY NĀLANI MCDOUGALL
    • ACHIEVING SOCIAL AND HEALTH EQUITY IN HAWAIʹI MENTAL HEALTH
      (pp. 254-264)
      JOSEPH KEAWEʹAIMOKU KAHOLOKULA

      An event at the checkout counter of the Ala Moana Longs Drugs store has stuck with me for life. I was nine years old, standing with my mom as the cashier rang up the total for the woman in front of us. The woman wrote out her check. The clerk took it and handed the woman her bags. Although it was common practice at Longs in those days, the clerk did not verify the check against her I.D.

      “Have a nice day,” the clerk said, as the woman walked away. Our turn at the checkout wasn’t so easy. Presented with...

    • PRAYING FOR MENDEDNESS FAITH AND COMMUNITY-BUILDING
      (pp. 265-271)
      JEFFREY TANGONAN ACIDO

      I am an Ilokano-Filipino, born into a working class, farming community in the parched earth of the Ilocos in the Philippines. As far as I can remember, all of my ancestors have tilled the land, growing rice, garlic, and tobacco in order to sustain the difficult life under the five hundred-plus years of colonial occupation by Spain and then the United States. As a result, my soul inherited a language that has shaped the way I engaged the world—in the Philippines when I was young, and in Hawai‘i as I grew older. Faith has been the source of my...

    • EVE
      (pp. 272-273)
      DARLENE RODRIGUES

      The oldest Shortraker Rockfish caught off of Alaska was thought to be about 100 years old. NOAA scientists also found that the fish’s advanced years had yet to take a toll on its reproductive abilities. “The belly was large,” NOAA researcher Paul Spencer told the Associated Press. “The ovaries were full of developing embryos.”¹

      For women everywhere with or without embryos and juicy eggs

      You are a 60-pound wonder and 44 inches long

      with 100 years wrought on your bone

      with a bellyfull of babies ready to spawn

      Caught in the trawl

      Swept in the pull of our nets and...

    • PUʹUHONUA, CREATING PLACES OF HEALING RETHINKING PRISONS
      (pp. 274-279)
      MARK PATTERSON

      When I was young growing up in Mākaha, there was a homeless drunkard named Raymond who was always sitting at the front entrance of the 7-11 next to Cornets store. Once or twice a month, my grandmother would go to the store to pick up Raymond and bring him to our house. Grandma would feed him and make him clean the yard. When he was finished she would let him wash up, clothe him, and feed him again. Grandma would give him money, and then Raymond would leave, walking back to 7-11. Shortly thereafter, he would be sitting at 7-11...

    • HE WELO SPIRITUAL CONNECTIONS
      (pp. 280-288)
      HĀWANE RIOS

      As I step out into the darkness, a peaceful calm comes over my being. Shades of blue paint the expansive sky, getting lighter as I journey to the top. A cloudbank comes to greet the summit with a gift of lei for an old friend. The cool mist of Lilinoe dances playfully with the breeze of Līhau. A gust of wind awakens my spirit and sends an electric chill through my feet, landing at my very core. The first rays of sun touch the great realm of Kanaloa and shine ever so slightly, like the dew on the wings of...

  11. ALOHA
    • DEFENDING HAWAIʹI WITHOUT MACHINE GUNS ISLAND-STYLE ACTIVISM
      (pp. 291-298)
      JAMES KOSHIBA

      We love Hawai‘i. The signs of that love are smoothed over the rear windows of our trucks and cars—“Maui Built,” “Moku Nui,” “HI Life”; all declare our island pride. Like all loves, however, this one can tip toward fear and anger when the things we treasure appear threatened. Debates over what’s best for Hawai‘i—wind, geothermal, urbanization, the Superferry, and more—thus devolve into open combat, fracturing our otherwise tight-knit communities. Even our bumper stickers evince this tension, urging us to “Live Aloha” while pledging to “Defend Hawai‘i”—with a machine gun.

      Some might say that public discourse in...

    • CEREMONY
      (pp. 299-300)
      NOʹU REVILLA

      Ladies and gentlemen, are we are gathered here today to join together in unholy matrimony these freshwaters of Hawai‘i to this state of Hawai‘i?

      Do you, state, take these waters from our lives, to have and to own from this day forward, for development and profits, in sickness and drought, to divert, privatize, and distribute ’til poetry, sustainable practices, and informed protest do you part?

      And do you, freshwaters of Hawai‘i, take this state, to be your deeply unfortunate husband? To permit his narrow mind and slippery fingers their illusions, as if he could actually contain you, as if his...

  12. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 301-314)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 315-315)