Confronting the Costs of War

Confronting the Costs of War: Military Power, State, and Society in Egypt and Israel

Michael N. Barnett
Copyright Date: 1992
Pages: 396
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7pfh1
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  • Book Info
    Confronting the Costs of War
    Book Description:

    What determines the strategies by which a state mobilizes resources for war? And does war preparation strengthen or weaken the state in relation to society? In addressing these questions, Michael Barnett develops a novel theoretical framework that traces the connection between war preparation and changes in state-society relations, and applies that framework to Egypt from 1952 to 1977 and Israel from 1948 through 1977.Confronting the Costs of Waraddresses major issues in international relations, comparative politics, and Middle Eastern studies.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-2070-2
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. List of Tables
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. Preface
    (pp. ix-2)
  5. CHAPTER ONE War Preparation and State Power
    (pp. 3-18)

    THE STATE’S attempt to mobilize the instruments of coercion to defend its territorial integrity has been closely associated with the development of the state and changes in state-society relations. Two themes dominate this discussion. The first is the “ratchet effect,” whereby the state, because of its pivotal role as defender of the country’s external security, must mobilize the necessary resources and take extraordinary domestic measures, both economically and politically, to meet these foreign challenges. Once war ends, these war-associated changes rarely return to prewar levels, nor do many of the state’s newly won powers return entirely to civil society.¹ Policies...

  6. CHAPTER TWO The Framework
    (pp. 19-50)

    THE RELATIONSHIP between the state and society has been summarily altered and shaped by the vigilant pursuit of national security and the participation in conflicts both latent and manifest. In chapter 1 I argued that war has been partnered with both the expansion and diminution of the state and that both are viewed as a direct outcome of the government’s mobilization of societal resources to confront external challenges. The intellectual puzzle is to construct an explanation that offers an understanding of how war-related processes can provoke within state power alternate periods of expansion or decline. Accordingly, I present a theoretical...

  7. CHAPTER THREE Egypt and Israel in Historical Perspective
    (pp. 51-79)

    BY SITUATING the Israeli and Egyptian cases in their historical contexts, I thereby provide an understanding of both the initial enabling and constraining conditions on each government’s war preparation strategies and the nature of state power in each country. This chapter focuses on those features of the social and economic structure identified as important determinants of the government’s war preparation strategies and contributing factors to state power. This historical exposition and documentation of Egypt’s and Israel’s economic and political development isolates those features of each country that are important to the present study.

    My discussion has two main points. First,...

  8. CHAPTER FOUR Explaining Egyptian War Preparation Strategies
    (pp. 80-152)

    THERE WAS no shortage of costly or difficult tasks confronting Egyptian governments from 1952 through 1977. These challenges arrived from all directions. From the international system Egyptian leaders had to confront both declining Great Powers and emerging regional powers, a dynamic that was duly reflected in the amount of scarce resources they channeled toward defense expenditures (see table 4.1). Between the years 1952 and 1956 Nasser confronted a decreasingly ominous relationship with Great Britain and an increasingly dangerous one with the Israelis that culminated in the 1956 Suez War. The second period between 1957 and 1967 demonstrates continuous concern with...

  9. CHAPTER FIVE Explaining Israeli War Preparation Strategies
    (pp. 153-209)

    ALTHOUGH Israel’s security posture has been the subject of intense scholarly scrutiny since its initial campaign for statehood in 1948, relatively neglected has been Israeli leaders’ ability to mobilize resources for a seemingly never-ending chore of war preparation. This omission is rather puzzling because the government’s mobilizing capacities certainly represent a significant reason for the country’s battlefield successes. This neglect may be due to a couple of factors. First, the realist tradition dominates security scholarship and assumes an autonomous state with direct and perfect access to societal resources. Second, the common wisdom holds that the Israeli state is strong vis-à-vis...

  10. CHAPTER SI X War and the Transformation of State Power
    (pp. 210-243)

    THE EGYPTIAN and Israeli experiences confirm and refute the views of both those scholars that contend that war enhances state power and those that assert that war undermines state power. In fact, not only did Egyptian and Israeli state power evidence tendencies in both directions, but, in fact, it also appears as if both states chartered parallel courses. Specifically, both the Egyptian and Israeli states experienced an expansion of state power between the beginning of each country’s respective time period and 1967, owing in part to the legacies of war preparation. After the 1967 War, however, intensified war preparation was...

  11. CHAPTER SEVEN Egypt and Israel in Comparative and Theoretical Perspective
    (pp. 244-262)

    MACROHISTORICAL concepts, often derived, formulated, and refined in other geographical regions, can enhance our understanding of various processes such as war preparation and state formation in the Middle East. Fred Halliday has suggested that the study of the Middle East has been dominated by those who argue for “analytic particularism,” that “categories used to describe these societies must themselves be specific tothe region.”¹ This entails both the construction of sociological categories and concepts particular to the region itself and not necessarily appropriate to other regions and the rejection of Weberian, Marxist, and other sociological favorites of Western academics. Analytical particularism...

  12. APPENDIX 1: Jewish Investment and Capital Inflow, 1932–1939 (LP thousands)
    (pp. 263-263)
  13. APPENDIX 1: Jewish Investment and Capital Inflow, 1932–1939 (LP thousands)
    (pp. 263-263)
  14. APPENDIX 3: Summary of Fiscal Operations, 1962/63–1978 (in millions of Egyptian pounds)
    (pp. 264-264)
  15. APPENDIX 3: Summary of Fiscal Operations, 1962/63–1978 (in millions of Egyptian pounds)
    (pp. 264-264)
  16. APPENDIX 5: Arab Financial Assistance to Egypt, 1973–1976 (in millions of dollars)
    (pp. 265-265)
  17. APPENDIX 6: Capital Imports to Israel, 1950–1967 (in millions of dollars)
    (pp. 266-266)
  18. APPENDIX 6: Capital Imports to Israel, 1950–1967 (in millions of dollars)
    (pp. 266-266)
  19. APPENDIX 8: Investments by Branch in the Economy, 1950–1967
    (pp. 267-267)
  20. APPENDIX 8: Investments by Branch in the Economy, 1950–1967
    (pp. 267-267)
  21. APPENDIX 10: Capital Imports to Israel, 1967–1977 (in millions of dollars)
    (pp. 268-268)
  22. APPENDIX 10: Capital Imports to Israel, 1967–1977 (in millions of dollars)
    (pp. 268-268)
  23. APPENDIX 12: Investments in Industry by Branch
    (pp. 269-269)
  24. APPENDIX 12: Investments in Industry by Branch
    (pp. 269-270)
  25. Notes
    (pp. 271-344)
  26. Bibliography
    (pp. 345-368)
  27. Index
    (pp. 369-378)