Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America

Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America: A Photographic Guide

Steve N. G. Howell
J. Brian Patteson
Kate Sutherland
Debra L. Shearwater
Copyright Date: 2012
Pages: 520
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7rz6z
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  • Book Info
    Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America
    Book Description:

    Petrels, albatrosses, and storm-petrels are among the most beautiful yet least known of all the world's birds, living their lives at sea far from the sight of most people. Largely colored in shades of gray, black, and white, these enigmatic and fast-flying seabirds can be hard to differentiate, particularly from a moving boat. Useful worldwide, not just in North America, this photographic guide is based on unrivaled field experience and combines insightful text and hundreds of full-color images to help you identify these remarkable birds.

    The first book of its kind, this guide features an introduction that explains ocean habitats and the latest developments in taxonomy. Detailed species accounts describe key identification features such as flight manner, plumage variation related to age and molt, seasonal occurrence patterns, and migration routes. Species accounts are arranged into groups helpful for field identification, and an overview of unique identification challenges is provided for each group. The guide also includes distribution maps for regularly occurring species as well as a bibliography, glossary, and appendixes.

    The first state-of-the-art photographic guide to these enigmatic seabirdsIncludes hundreds of full-color photos throughoutFeatures detailed species accounts that describe flight, plumage, distribution, and moreProvides overviews of ocean habitats, taxonomy, and conservationOffers tips on how to observe and identify birds at sea

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-3962-9
    Subjects: Zoology, Biological Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-x)
  3. LIST OF SPECIES COVERED
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. PREFACE
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  6. HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
    (pp. xvii-xxiv)
  7. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-50)

    In traditional classifications such as that of the American Ornithologists’ Union (AOU) (1998), tubenoses are a well-defined group of seabirds that comprise the order Procellariiformes, and are so-named because their nostrils are encased in tube-like structures on the bill. Tubenoses are represented by up to five families worldwide: northern storm-petrels, southern storm-petrels, albatrosses, petrels (including shearwaters), and diving-petrels (a southern hemisphere family not covered in this guide, and sometimes merged with the petrels). Based upon DNA studies, Sibley and Monroe (1990) treated all of the tubenoses as a single family (Procellariidae) within the superfamily Procellarioidea, which also includes frigatebirds, penguins,...

  8. Species Accounts
    (pp. 51-454)

    Petrels, which include shearwaters, comprise about 100 species of medium-sized to large pelagic birds found throughout the world’s oceans (Figs 62–64). About 40 species have occurred in the region. Ages appear similar in all but giant-petrels (unrecorded in North America); sexes are similar but males average larger and often have bigger bills. Plumages are colored in black, dark browns, grays, and white, often in striking patterns, and several species are polymorphic. Bills are black in many species, gray in some, and pale yellowish or pinkish overall in others; legs and feet vary from black to pale pinkish or pale...

  9. ABBREVIATIONS AND TERMINOLOGY
    (pp. 455-458)
  10. APPENDIX A: RECENTLY EXTINCT SPECIES
    (pp. 459-460)
  11. APPENDIX B: HYPOTHETICAL RECORDS
    (pp. 461-462)
  12. LITERATURE CITED
    (pp. 463-480)
  13. INDEX
    (pp. 481-483)