The Five Habits of Highly Effective Honeybees (and What We Can Learn from Them)

The Five Habits of Highly Effective Honeybees (and What We Can Learn from Them): From "Honeybee Democracy"

THOMAS D. SEELEY
Copyright Date: 2010
Edition: DGO - Digital original
Pages: 18
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7sd4t
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  • Book Info
    The Five Habits of Highly Effective Honeybees (and What We Can Learn from Them)
    Book Description:

    Studies of animal behavior have often been invoked to help explain and even guide human behavior. Think of Pavlov and his dogs or Goodall and her chimps. But, as these examples indicate, the tendency has been to focus on "higher," more cognitively developed, and thus, it is thought, more intelligent creatures than mindless, robotic insects. Not so! Learn here how honeybees work together to form a collective intelligence and even how they make decisions democratically. The wizzzzdom of crowds indeed! Here are five habits of effective groups that we can learn from these clever honeybees.

    Princeton Shorts are brief selections excerpted from influential Princeton University Press publications produced exclusively in eBook format. They are selected with the firm belief that while the original work remains an important and enduring product, sometimes we can all benefit from a quick take on a topic worthy of a longer book.

    In a world where every second counts, how better to stay up-to speed on current events and digest the kernels of wisdom found in the great works of the past? Princeton Shorts enables you to be an instant expert in a world where information is everywhere but quality is at a premium.The Five Habits of Highly Effective Honeybees (and What We Can Learn from Them)does just that.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-4116-5
    Subjects: Zoology, Management & Organizational Behavior

Table of Contents

  1. THE FIVE HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE HONEYBEES AND WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM THEM
    (pp. 1-21)

    Let us now consider what lessons we humans can learn from honeybees about how to structure a decision-making group so that the knowledge and brainpower of its members is effectively marshaled to produce good collective choices. This is an important subject, for human society relies on groups to be more reliable than individuals when it comes to making weighty decisions. This is why we have juries, boards of trustees, blue-ribbon panels, and nine justices on the U.S. Supreme Court. But as we all know, groups don’t always make smart decisions either. Unless a group is properly organized, so...