Birds of the Dominican Republic and Haiti

Birds of the Dominican Republic and Haiti

Steven Latta
Christopher Rimmer
Allan Keith
James Wiley
Herbert Raffaele
Kent McFarland
Eladio Fernandez
Barry Kent MacKay
Tracy Pedersen
Kristin Williams
Cynthie Fisher
Bart Rulon
Copyright Date: 2006
Pages: 360
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7t7p9
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  • Book Info
    Birds of the Dominican Republic and Haiti
    Book Description:

    Birds of the Dominican Republic and Haitifills a large void in the literature on birdwatching and the environment in these tropical countries. The first comprehensive field guide devoted to Hispaniola's birds, it provides detailed accounts for more than 300 species, including thirty-one endemic species.

    Included in the species descriptions are details on key field marks, similar species, voice, habitats, geographic distribution on Hispaniola, status, nesting, range, and local names used in both the Dominican Republic and Haiti. The authors also comment on ecology, behavior, and taxonomic status. The book provides color illustrations and range maps based on the most recent data available. But the authors' intent is to provide more than just a means of identifying birds. The guide also underscores the importance of promoting the conservation of migratory and resident birds, and building support for environmental measures.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-3410-5
    Subjects: Zoology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-1)
  5. MAP OF HISPANIOLA
    (pp. 2-3)
  6. Elevational Map of Hispaniola
    (pp. 4-4)
  7. PLAN OF THE GUIDE
    (pp. 5-7)
  8. TOPOGRAPHY AND HABITATS OF HISPANIOLA
    (pp. 8-11)
  9. ENDEMIC SPECIES AND SUBSPECIES
    (pp. 12-13)
  10. AVIAN CONSERVATION ON HISPANIOLA
    (pp. 14-17)
  11. ORNITHOLOGICAL HISTORY OF HISPANIOLA
    (pp. 18-18)
  12. DESCRIPTIVE PARTS OF A BIRD
    (pp. 19-19)
  13. PLATE SECTION
    (pp. None)
  14. SPECIES ACCOUNTS
    (pp. 21-217)

    The birds of this large, aquatic family include six subfamilies that occur on Hispaniola. Whistling-ducks are primarily nocturnal and often graze in wet, grassy meadows or dip for food in shallow ponds. In flight their long legs and feet trail behind the tail, and the head is drooped, making them easily recognizable. Geese are larger than ducks and have a longer neck. They are a mostly terrestrial subfamily, often feeding on grains in meadows and uplands. They occur only as vagrants to Hispaniola. Dabbling ducks (Wood Duck through Green-winged Teal) are the best represented subfamily on Hispaniola. Dabblers only feed...

  15. Recent Additions to the Checklist
    (pp. 218-218)

    Below we list four species of migratory birds from North America that are new to the Hispaniola checklist and were reported just before publication.

    A female Gadwall was seen and photographed in late-April 2005 at Letan Kokoye (Étang Cocotier) between Les Cayes and Camp Perrin. Although a number of earlier reports exist, this is the first confirmed record for the species.

    A single bird was seen and photographed at Salinas de Baní in mid-October 2005. This was one of several vagrant species recorded on the same day following an extended period with weather conditions unfavorable for continued migration.

    A single...

  16. APPENDIX A: Birdwatching on Hispaniola
    (pp. 219-228)
  17. APPENDIX B: Checklist of Birds of Hispaniola
    (pp. 229-238)
  18. SELECTED REFERENCES
    (pp. 239-242)
  19. INDEX OF LOCAL NAMES
    (pp. 243-249)
  20. INDEX OF ENGLISH AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES
    (pp. 250-258)