Bibliography of John Rastell

Bibliography of John Rastell

Copyright Date: 1999
Pages: 192
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zkpz
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  • Book Info
    Bibliography of John Rastell
    Book Description:

    Drawing on over a decade of detailed bibliographical investigation, Devereux demonstrates that Rastell was a leading figure in the development of law books, the first printer to create type for music, and a significant figure in the preparation and publication of theological works. Rastell also promoted and published important humanist texts, including two dialogues by Thomas More, a number of plays, including Interlude of the Four Elements which he may have written himself, and several works by John Skelton.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-6777-1
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-xii)
    Peter Auksi and M.J. Toswell
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
    E.J. Devereux
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xv-xviii)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-26)

    John Rastell (c. 1475-1536) has always interested students of Tudor thought, from John Bale, who knew him late in life, to scholars of our own time, who have been bemused by the great variety of his concerns and the peculiar blend of idealism and opportunism that are so typical of his age and somehow also unique to him. Since his death, as during his life, he has been overshadowed by his friend and brother-in-law Sir Thomas More, a greater and wiser man no doubt, but a man who shared many of Rastell’s interests and must have encouraged him in many...

  7. TYPOGRAPHICAL PREFACE
    (pp. 27-36)
  8. BOOK DESIGNS
    (pp. 37-82)

    Device McKerrow 40, a bordered crible block, 27x89 mm., centered on a shield with Rastell’s monogram and a scroll expanding the initials into the motto “lusticia Regat.” Its first known appearance was with the larger device McKerrow 37 in theLiber Assisarumof 1513-1514 (3). It was used infrequently, perhaps because it communicated only a concern for law, while the larger device included cosmographical concerns, or perhaps simply because it had weak borders and a tendency not to print clearly. Its last recorded appearance was in the anonymousLife of St. Thomas a Becket,which I have dated—not without...

  9. Bibliography
    (pp. 85-176)
  10. Appendix: Possible Additions
    (pp. 177-178)
  11. A Selection of Modern Rastell Studies
    (pp. 179-183)