Practical IT Service Management

Practical IT Service Management: A concise guide for busy executives

THEJENDRA B.S
Copyright Date: 2014
Published by: IT Governance Publishing
Pages: 279
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zsxdc
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  • Book Info
    Practical IT Service Management
    Book Description:

    How can you ensure that IT problems do not damage your business?

    IT is integral to modern organisations, and the way you manage it can make or break your business.

    IT service management - not just for the IT director

    It is not enough for the IT manager to understand the latest technical developments. For your company to succeed, everyone in the IT department must also understand their role in achieving overall business goals.

    IT service management questions answered

    Written in a friendly question-and-answer format, Practical ITSM explains how to set up a technical service management structure, using the best practice framework established by the latest version of the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL® 2011).

    ITIL framework for structured ITSM

    The ITIL system is the most widely adopted approach to technical IT service management worldwide. It shows technical support staff how to provide the efficient IT services that are vital to your company's success. Learn how ITIL can help you to:

    Protect your company's reputationIf you system goes down for any length of time, you might not be able to process an order or honour a contract. ITSM helps your business meet customer deadlines and expectations.Safeguard vital information and recover from IT setbacksWithout adequate IT service management you could risk losing vital information, like payroll, billing and sales data.Retain momentumWith a structured IT service management in place, routine maintenance issues can be quickly resolved, minimising delays and improving productivity.

    Read this book to see how ITIL can help your IT function support business goals.

    eISBN: 978-1-84928-547-6
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. 5-6)
    Thejendra B.S
  3. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    (pp. 7-7)
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. 8-15)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 16-18)

    The advancement and ease of availability of new and useful technologies has enabled thousands of organisations, worldwide, to implement, and become heavily dependent on, technology for running their businesses. It is not possible to run any organisation, small or big, without the use of some computer or telecom-related technologies. With so much proliferation of hardware, software and networking equipment it is necessary to have specialised and dedicated technology support departments to look after them. Otherwise, companies can get into serious trouble. A professional, technology support department is as essential to any organisation as a qualified finance department or a senior...

  6. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 19-28)

    The term ‘IT’ is an abbreviation of Information Technology. A general dictionary defines IT as the development, installation and implementation of computer systems, telecommunications and software applications. In practical terms, IT consists of:

    1. Computers, such as desktops, servers, laptops, mainframes, and the data that they hold.

    2. Software, such as operating systems (Windows, Unix, Linux, Novell, specialised operating systems) and applications, such as word processors, spreadsheets, databases, productivity tools, business applications and custom-built applications.

    3. Communication and telecom equipment, such as PBX, lease lines, the Internet, telephone networks, Local Area and Wide Area Networks.

    4. Other specialised IT equipment...

  7. CHAPTER 2: OVERVIEW OF ITIL 2011
    (pp. 29-46)

    This chapter provides an overview of ITIL 2011, which is the latest update released. Earlier versions will also be explained briefly, but elaborate comparisons will not be made between them, to avoid confusion. As mentioned earlier, ITIL is under copyright. No exact material, diagrams or contents from the official ITIL books are reproduced in this book, however, the exact ITIL definitions from the official ITIL glossary are mentioned in some chapters, just to elaborate the concepts being explained.

    The term ‘ITIL’ refers to a best practice framework for IT service management, and consists of a series of official publications (books)...

  8. CHAPTER 3: THE ITIL LIFECYCLE
    (pp. 47-67)

    The objective of service strategy is to provide a plan (or strategy) to serve customers. This will assess customer needs, and the marketplace, to determine which services the organisation will offer, and what capabilities need to be developed. Service strategy largely relies upon a market-driven approach, and looks at what businesses need and don’t need. It develops strategies to satisfy business needs, focuses on providing services that create business value and selects the appropriate strategy to deliver those services. Its ultimate goal is to make the IT organisation think and act in a strategic manner. It aligns the business and...

  9. CHAPTER 4: SERVICE DESK FUNCTION
    (pp. 68-82)

    A service desk is usually a single point of contact for your business managers and end-users to reach the IT department, for resolving all their IT issues or technical troubles. This is where all questions, issues and requests are logged, recorded and followed through until closure. A service desk is a functional unit consisting of a number of dedicated staff responsible for dealing with service events, usually made via telephone, e-mail or the Web. The type of service desk you need depends on the requirements of your end-user base. A business can have several service desks for different areas: computers,...

  10. CHAPTER 5: INCIDENT MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 83-94)

    An incident is any event that causes, or may cause, an interruption to the quality of an agreed IT service. For example, a power supply failure in a user’s computer, a user logon ID locking up, a user not being able to access a web server or an e-mail system, are all classified as incidents.

    The ITIL definition of an incident is:

    ‘An unplanned interruption to an IT service or a reduction in the quality of an IT service. Failure of a configuration item that has not yet impacted service is also an incident. For example, failure of one disk...

  11. CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 95-102)

    A problem is an incident, or multiple incidents, for which the root cause is not known. Problems can sometimes be discovered because of multiple incidents exhibiting similar systems, e.g. a computer not booting-up occasionally is an incident but the same computer (or all similar models) not booting-up every Monday morning is a problem that needs further investigation. Until a solution is found, those end-users will face the same issues week after week. An incident cannot be classified as a problem because of the end-user’s seniority, or the tantrums end-users may throw. For example, if the mouse of the CEO’s computer...

  12. CHAPTER 7: CHANGE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 103-114)

    Today, technology and related business models are transforming at an alarming rate. Organisations have to adopt the latest technologies and processes rapidly, to be competitive and innovative to their clients. In IT, changes usually mean implementing new hardware, software, network equipment, a tool or an upgrade. In ITIL, a change is any addition, deletion, modification, etc. that affects IT. Upgrading a payroll software version on an important finance server is a change. However, change should not be implemented just for the sake of speed, or in a haphazard manner. An orderly and careful process is required for implementing change, based...

  13. CHAPTER 8: RELEASE AND DEPLOYMENT MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 115-127)

    A release is an authorised and tested change to the IT infrastructure or service. A set of new files that upgrade an anti-virus program from Version 1 to Version 2 can be called a release. A techie may view this as a bunch of files to be copied from a DVD into a production file server, but, from the ITIL perspective, it is a release because the change management team has approved copying of the files to the specified file server.

    The ITIL definition of a release is:

    ‘One or more changes to an IT service that are built, tested...

  14. CHAPTER 9: SERVICE ASSET AND CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 128-145)

    An asset is any resource or capability. Assets of a service provider include anything that could contribute to the delivery of a service, and can be one of the following types: management, organisation, process, knowledge, people, information, applications, infrastructure or financial capital. Resources include IT infrastructure, people, budgets and other things that help in delivering an IT service. Capabilities may develop over the years. Service providers must develop distinctive capabilities that can keep the competition at bay. For capabilities to increase, IT departments must continuously train and upgrade themselves to be competitive. In this book we will be mainly concentrating...

  15. CHAPTER 10: SERVICE LEVEL MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 146-159)

    Service level management (SLM) is the process of defining, agreeing, documenting and managing an effective IT service that is expected by the business. SLM covers service level agreements (SLAs), operational level agreements (OLAs), underpinning contracts (UCs) and related activities, such as periodic reviews, updating and deletions, as well as publishing, and making them known to all concerned. The main aim of SLM is to ensure an acceptable quality of the IT services provided, at a cost acceptable to the business, and indirectly to the final external consumers of the company’s products. SLM is part of the service design phase of...

  16. CHAPTER 11: SERVICE CATALOGUE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 160-168)

    A general dictionary defines a catalogue as ‘a list of titles, course offerings or articles for exhibition or sale, usually including descriptive information or illustrations’. In ITIL language, a service catalogue is a database, or a structured document, containing information about IT services available to current and prospective customers. It can provide a descriptive list of all services a tech support department is responsible for. The catalogue can also contain information about deliverables, prices, contact details, procedures and request processes. By having a service catalogue, organisations can ensure all areas of the business can view an accurate, consistent picture of...

  17. CHAPTER 12: CAPACITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 169-180)

    A general dictionary defines ‘capacity’ in two ways: the maximum or optimum amount that can be produced; or the ability to hold. In ITIL, capacity management is part of the service design phase of the core lifecycle that handles IT capacity for current and future business requirements. It ensures that the required capacity exists in the IT infrastructure to handle growing business demands. The IT capacity team will determine the amount of disk space and processing power required if the company has to buy a new file server for storing huge engineering drawing files. Or it may recommend the optimum...

  18. CHAPTER 13: DEMAND MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 181-186)

    A general dictionary defines demand in several ways. The one that applies to IT is any urgent or pressing requirement for one or more specific IT services. The requirement can be for a new service, or an upgrade to an existing service that is currently performing inadequately.

    Demand management is a sub-process of service strategy. Demand management is a sub-process of service strategy. Demand management is still closely interconnected with capacity management, but can be viewed as one step higher and being more strategic in nature, as it can influence sharing and redistributing an organisation’s resources optimally.

    Whether it is...

  19. CHAPTER 14: AVAILABILITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 187-195)

    A general dictionary defines availability as something that is ready for use or accessible when required. In ITIL, availability refers to the accessibility of the various infrastructure and services provided by IT services during the stated time periods.

    The ITIL definition of availability is:

    ‘Ability of an IT service or other configuration item to perform its agreed function when required. Availability is determined by reliability, maintainability, serviceability, performance and security. Availability is usually calculated as a percentage. This calculation is often based on agreed service time and downtime. It is best practice to calculate availability of an IT service using...

  20. CHAPTER 15: INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 196-203)

    Organisations rely on several types of data for their business, and can suffer from various disasters if critical information and data are compromised by any means. Some of the information contained in them can be confidential and must not be viewed, or altered, by unauthorised persons. The salary details of all your employees cannot be made public for everyone to know or view. This could lead to your company payment website being breached and defaced by hackers, causing a loss of reputation and other disasters. It is necessary to have a protective envelope around the various kinds of data that...

  21. CHAPTER 16: ACCESS MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 204-209)

    Access management aims to grant authorised users the right to use a service, while preventing access to non-authorised users. An organisation can have several computers, network equipment, servers and databases required for its business. Naturally, all equipment cannot, and should not, be accessible to every user or department. The important designs stored in a folder on an engineering server should be accessible only to the engineering staff, and not to every employee in the office. So, IT departments must ensure access is provided only to authorised persons, and prevent unauthorised persons from viewing or modifying them. An access management department’s...

  22. CHAPTER 17: IT SERVICE CONTINUITY MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 210-226)

    IT service continuity management (SCM) is part of the service design phase of the ITSM core lifecycle. Service continuity management deals with managing risks to ensure that an organisation’s IT infrastructure can continue to provide some minimum services, even in the event of a scenario, such as a major IT disaster. If the entire data centre that houses all the important servers gets damaged due to a fire, electrical short circuit, or some other sudden disaster, how will your company recover? How can you ensure that it is prepared to handle such disasters? SCM prepares your organisation for speedy recovery...

  23. CHAPTER 18: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR IT SERVICES
    (pp. 227-235)

    Financial management is the process of budgeting, accounting and charging for IT services. The objective of the IT financial management process is the proper management of monetary resources to support the organisation’s IT goals. Financial management ensures that any solution proposed by IT services to meet the requirements defined in service level management, is justified from a cost and budget standpoint. Financial data provides the costs associated with the business to make decisions regarding changes in the IT infrastructure, systems, staffing or processes. If the business wants to add 100 more employees to the organisation, then IT financial management will...

  24. CHAPTER 19: SUPPLIER MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 236-248)

    A supplier is a third-party organisation, or an individual, responsible for supplying goods and services. Examples are hardware and software vendors, networking and telecom suppliers, outsourcing companies and consultants. No organisation can do its business, or use IT, without depending on one or more suppliers, and suppliers have become important and critical business partners in most organisations worldwide.

    The main reasons why suppliers are necessary are as follows (the terms vendor and supplier are used interchangeably throughout this book):

    Organisations have become highly dependent on IT equipment, such as computers, laptops, servers, telecoms and networking. In many organisations, entire operations...

  25. CHAPTER 20: IT OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT FUNCTION
    (pp. 249-251)

    This function focuses on the day-to-day, maintenance activities required to operate and support IT services. These operational actions involve executing repeatable, standardised procedures. They may also take assistance from other divisions and external vendors if required.

    The ITIL definition of IT operations management is:

    ‘The function within an IT service provider which performs the daily activities needed to manage IT services and the supporting IT infrastructure. IT operations management includes IT operations control and facilities management.’

    IT operations management conducts essential daily and routine activities required to monitor and control the health of the IT infrastructure, similar to periodic health...

  26. CHAPTER 21: GENERAL TIPS AND ADVICE FOR IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT
    (pp. 252-261)

    Running and managing an IT department is not easy. It has its share of joys and woes, as it is highly exciting and also very stressful. You can have countless sleepless nights as you rush to your office in your pyjamas to revive a dead server. Many technical professionals and newcomers get pushed into managing an IT department, without enough training or experience and without a clear idea of what is expected of them. The troubles you could face can range from a constant stream of minor irritations, to absolute nightmares that could destroy you. IT management requires a greater...

  27. APPENDIX 1: SAMPLE SLA BETWEEN IT SERVICES AND ROCKSOLID BUSINESS MANAGERS
    (pp. 262-268)
  28. APPENDIX 2: SAMPLE OLA BETWEEN IT DEPARTMENT AND THE ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT
    (pp. 269-269)
  29. APPENDIX 3: SAMPLE UC BETWEEN ROCKSOLID IT SERVICES AND ABC COMPUTER CORP
    (pp. 270-271)
  30. APPENDIX 4: A SIMPLE IT SERVICE MANAGEMENT FLOW WITH INTERACTIONS AMONG DIFFERENT PROCESSES
    (pp. 272-273)
  31. APPENDIX 5: THE ITIL GLOSSARY
    (pp. 274-274)
  32. APPENDIX 6: ITSM BOOKS AND OTHER RESOURCES
    (pp. 275-275)
  33. ITG RESOURCES
    (pp. 276-279)