Does Money Matter?

Does Money Matter?: Prospects for Higher Education in Ontario

Marion R. Porter
John Porter
Bernard R. Blishen
Copyright Date: 1979
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zszgs
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  • Book Info
    Does Money Matter?
    Book Description:

    Does Money Matter provides a useful summary of previous studies and government schemes to promote accessibility, and evaluates present policy in light of its analysis of the effect of social class, sex, money and other factors on the educational aspirations of young people.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-9555-2
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE TO THE REVISED EDITlON
    (pp. ix-xv)
    MRP, JP and BRB
  4. PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION
    (pp. xvi-xx)
    MRP, JP and BRB
  5. CHAPTER I EQUALITY AND COSTS: THE GREAT DEBATE
    (pp. 1-30)

    This statement by the Economic Council of Canada summarized the concern of federal and provincial government officials in the early seventies to maintain and even to extend post-secondary educational opportunity, which had been one of the main policy objectives of the sixties, and at the same time to reduce the proportion of the expenditures on higher education that are paid by the public treasury.

    The reason for the concern is clear. Throughout Canada there was a phenomenal increase in enrolments in post-secondary institutions. Because of improved facilities. the establishment of community colleges, and higher salaries for university teachers, there was...

  6. CHAPTER II SOCIAL CLASS AND EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY
    (pp. 31-59)

    All studies of what high school students hope and expect to do after high school show a relationship between their educational aspirations and expectations and their social class position. This is such a well established finding that, as Breton wrote, if a survey did not show such a relationship the methodology of the survey would be suspect. And, in fact, even with the very crude social class measure used by Brelon and Macdonald, and the unsatisfactory measure used by Clark, Kent, Fallis and Cook, both of those surveys were able to demonstrate a relationship between social class and students’ educational...

  7. CHAPTER III THE BRIGHT ONES
    (pp. 60-84)

    Equality of educational opportunity through accessibility means that students, regardless of their social background or economic circumstances, should be able to go to university if they are capable of benefitting from a university education. How can we determine whether a student is capable of benefitting from it? What characteristics are requisite if he or she is to succeed at university? One element is intelligence. We would assume that a person with superior intelligence would be capable of doing university work if he had the prerequisite skills and knowledge to handle intellectual work at this level. Another element is motivation. He...

  8. CHAPTER IV SEX AND ASPIRATIONS
    (pp. 85-105)

    The justifications for equality of educational opportunity that were presented in Chapter I apply to both sexes. It is as important to develop the girl’s potential, both for her own sake and for the benefit of society, as it is to develop the boy’s. Girls as well as boys deserve the opportunity to live fuller, more satisfying lives through enlarging their intellectual horizons. Since women arc a large part of the labour force. they, too, need to be trained to fit into the increasingly complex occupational structure of the society. Girls as well as boys should have the opportunity to...

  9. CHAPTER V FINANCING A UNIVERSITY EDUCATION
    (pp. 106-147)

    In their discussions of accessibility to higher education and student aid schemes, economists often employ a model of a rational decision-maker operating in a free market. The assumption is that where there is complete knowledge of costs and returns, psychic as well as financial, individuals will be able to make free and rational choices. If fees are high, returns to education are known. and money is available to borrow, economists argue that it is simply a matter of calculating whether or not it is worth it to go to a community college or a university.

    As the system at present...

  10. CHAPTER VI TOWARDS EQUALITY
    (pp. 148-159)

    Ontario has undoubtedly progressed towards greater accessibility to higher education in the last twenty years. Increased enrolments and expenditures, more money available for student financial assistance, the development of alternative post-secondary institutions to universities – all of these as we reviewed in Chapter I, attest to the improvement. Progress is also evident in the considerably greater numbers of young people completing their secondary schooling. Of the pupils who entered Grade 9 in 1947, only 20 percent survived to Grade 13. Almost twenty years later, the retention rates had doubled. Of the pupils who entered Grade 9 in 1966, 40 percent survived...

  11. APPENDIX A: THE FORMATION OF ASPIRATIONS: A MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS
    (pp. 160-184)
  12. APPENDIX B: METHODOLOGICAL NOTES
    (pp. 185-195)
  13. APPENDIX C: A NOTE ON THE FRENCH-SPEAKING STUDENTS
    (pp. 196-204)
  14. NOTES
    (pp. 205-212)