In His Name

In His Name: The Anglican Experience in Upper Canada, 1791-1854

Curtis Fahey
Copyright Date: 1991
Pages: 371
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zt097
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  • Book Info
    In His Name
    Book Description:

    This first scholarly account of the Church of England in Upper Canada makes a substantial contribution to an understanding of the religious, political and intellectual development of British North America. The author examines the church's role as the colony's officially "established" church, the Anglican clergy's response to political reverses, and the eventual theological divisions among the clergy.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-7363-5
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-xii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. xiii-xx)
    Curtis Fahey
  4. CHAPTER ONE ESTABLISHMENT AND SURVIVAL
    (pp. 1-36)

    No period in the Church of England’s history in Upper Canada has been more neglected than that from the founding of the colony in 1791 until the years immediately following the War of 1812. This neglect of the formative era of Upper Canadian Anglicanism is particularly regrettable since a review of it illuminates both the elements that would remain constant in the Anglican experience and those that would change. Driven by a deep belief in its mission as the established church of Upper Canada, the Church of England in these years found itself in a religiously diverse society that mocked...

  5. CHAPTER TWO PREACHING THE WORD
    (pp. 37-60)

    For the Church of England, one of the most striking and distressing features of Upper Canadian life in the 1820s and 1830s was the entrenched position of its denominational rivals. Religious diversity, of course, was nothing new, but in the post-1820 period it became even more pronounced. In spreading its message in this pluralistic society, the Church of England set out in a new direction, adopting an energetic approach to evangelization and modifying its institutional structure to meet the needs of a rapidly growing society. Its efforts enjoyed a fair measure of success, certainly far more than has been generally...

  6. CHAPTER THREE BUILDING A CHURCH
    (pp. 61-88)

    Like other Anglican clergymen, John Strachan came to believe after the War of 1812 that the rapid growth of the Church of England’s rivals demanded a vigorous response. In his case, however, determination to promote the Anglican cause took the form not only of a renewed commitment to missionary activity, but also of a concerted effort to strengthen the church through political action. By taking measures to turn the clergy reserves into a profitable endowment, and by attempting to create an Anglican-controlled university, Strachan set his sights on bolstering the position of the Anglican establishment. Achieving this goal would, he...

  7. CHAPTER FOUR THE END OF HARMONY
    (pp. 89-112)

    There was more to Strachan in the 1820s and 1830s than rage and bitterness. Just as significant was the profound change in his attitude towards other denominations. Defeats and disappointments on various fronts—the difficulties encountered in the Church of England’s missionary crusade, the growing momentum of the campaign against the clergy reserves, and the success of the church’s opponents in blocking the opening of King’s College—shattered the commitment to inter-denominational harmony that had inspiredStrachan in earlier, more tranquil times. Furious over the blows being suffered by his church, and convinced that the colony’s social and political order was...

  8. CHAPTER FIVE THE DEFENCE OF THE OLD ORDER
    (pp. 113-162)

    As an ideologue, Strachan was anything but listless in responding to the religious and political developments of the 1820s and 1830s. Besides fighting a no-holds-barred battle with dissenters, he spent much of his time during these years expounding his highly conservative social and political philosophy. And he took every opportunity to defend the Church of England’s established status against the attacks of those who were calling for religious equality. Without question, his pronouncements on these subjects reflected his feisty frame of mind as he locked horns with the forces of reform. Yet, at the same time, they could conceal neither...

  9. CHAPTER SIX DEFEAT
    (pp. 163-196)

    If the 1830s were a bad dream for Anglican clergymen, the 1840s and 1850s were a nightmare. For Strachan, who became the first bishop of the diocese of Toronto in 1839, and indeed for the entire Anglican clergy, the union of the Canadas and the inauguration of responsible government spelled the end of the loyal and conservative Upper Canada they had always known. On top of this, with the transformation of King’s College into the completely secular University of Toronto and the secularization of the clergy reserves, Anglican clergymen were forced to admit defeat in the long, tempestuous struggle to...

  10. CHAPTER SEVEN THE SEEDS OF INDEPENDENCE
    (pp. 197-238)

    The Anglican experience after 1837 had its share of paradox. In the same period in which Anglican clergymen were affirming their belief in the tenets of conservative ideology and in the policy of church establishment, important strides were being made in the transformation of the Church of England into a self-governing, self-supporting and democratic institution. This transformation — highlighted by the campaign to establish a church synod with elected lay representatives, and by the efforts of an organization known as the Church Society to render the church more self-sufficient financially — was on the verge of completion by the time the clergy...

  11. CHAPTER EIGHT A HOUSE DIVIDED
    (pp. 239-288)

    From the late 1830s on, in the wake of the resurgence of High Anglicanism triggered by the Oxford movement in England, the Church of England in Upper Canada was deeply split along theological lines. While theChurchand a large number of clergymen, including Strachan, were deeply influenced by Tractarianism — as the ideas of the Oxford movement were known — there was also a formidable group of clergy who denounced the Oxford theology as a form of “popery” and upheld the Evangelical vision of the church’s nature and mission. This confrontation between High Churchmen and Evangelicals was serious enough when it...

  12. CONCLUSION
    (pp. 289-300)

    The Anglican experience in Upper Canada was extraordinarily rich and varied, encompassing everything from missionary labours to political battles, from the campaign for synodical government to theological wrangling. An awareness of that richness and variety guards against simplistic characterizations either of the men who served the Church of England, or of the work of the church itself. Like other churches in the colony, the Church of England included among its clergy all kinds of men: the simple and the sophisticated, the incompetent and the immensely skilled. Similarly, its record, like that of all denominations, was mixed. Neither a success nor...

  13. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 301-336)
  14. INDEX
    (pp. 337-350)