Economic Intelligence and National Security

Economic Intelligence and National Security

Edited by Evan H. Potter
Copyright Date: 1998
Pages: 233
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zt2xt
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  • Book Info
    Economic Intelligence and National Security
    Book Description:

    Since the end of the Cold War, competition among states has been waged along economic rather than ideological or military lines. In Canada, as elsewhere, this shift has forced a rethinking of the role of intelligence services in protecting and promoting national economic security. The scholars and practitioners featured here explore the aim, existing mandate, and practical applications of economic espionage from a Canadian and comparative perspective, and present a range of options for policy-makers. Economic Intelligence & National Security examines the laws in place to thwart economic spying, and the challenges and ethical problems faced by agencies working clandestinely to support their national private sectors.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-7407-6
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. Figures and Tables
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. GLOSSARY
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-ix)
  6. List of Acronyms
    (pp. x-xii)
  7. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-20)
    Evan H. Potter

    What are the appropriate roles and mandates for intelligence services in a world in which there is growing competition for market share and a recognition that, more than ever, there is a need for a rules-based system to govern global economic activity? To be sure, gathering economic intelligence is a key priority of any national government and its intelligence community. This community includes all the institutions of the state (of which intelligence services are but one component) that collect, analyze, and distribute information to protect and promote national economic security, whether it be information on a new market for telephone...

  8. I THE SYSTEM OF ECONOMIC INTELLIGENCE-GATHERING IN CANADA
    (pp. 21-78)
    Evan H. Potter

    The end of the cold war, increased globalization, and the integration of Canada into a North American community have all focused attention on the role and importance of economic security. As well, the Chrétien government’s 1994 Foreign Policy Review called for a broadening of the definition of security (referred to as “human security”) to include economic prosperity.¹ Canada, perhaps more than any other industrialized nation given its dependence on trade, is redefining its national priorities as the objectives of economic growth and technological innovation are becoming paramount in the face of increasing international competition.

    If Canada’s foreign policy strategy during...

  9. II ECONOMIC AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS AND INTELLIGENCE SERVICES
    (pp. 79-128)
    Samuel D. Porteous

    The 1990s is a decade of fundamental political and economic change. The collapse of the Soviet Union and all its repercussions, coupled with a rapidly changing and increasingly interdependent world economy, have resulted in the relative ascendance of economic concerns. In a world free from the constraints of a close to all-consuming military and ideological conflict, low politics has become high, and the concept of “economic security” has gained significant ground on its military and political counterparts. This chapter examines the implications of these changes for Western intelligence services. More specifically, it considers current and potential roles for intelligence services...

  10. III THE IMPACT OF THE LEGAL REGIME
    (pp. 129-196)
    J. Anthony VanDuzer

    Information and technology are critical assets for businesses and governments in the global economy of the 1990s. Businesses in Canada and elsewhere require continuous access to the best available information and technologies in order to become competitive. Once a competitive advantage has been attained, however, maintaining it often depends as much on a business’s ability to protect its information and technology from appropriation as on its access to new information and technology. As a consequence, access and protection have become important issues of business strategy and organization. The chapter by Evan Potter in this study suggests that this is an...

  11. IV THE ECONOMICS OF ECONOMIC INTELLIGENCE
    (pp. 197-218)
    James A. Brander

    The traditional role of intelligence services is to provide information to governments about threats to national security. Intelligence services as a group have normally focused on military, political, and potential terrorist activity. A typical intelligence service also devotes a good deal of effort to keeping track of other intelligence services. In addition, however, intelligence services have also been involve in the provision of economic intelligence. Sometimes this merely involves the compilation and analysis of publicly available information, but it may also involve economic espionage.

    With the decline of East-West tensions, the relative importance of military and political intelligence has diminished....

  12. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 219-220)