Bibliography of Emblematic Manuscripts

Bibliography of Emblematic Manuscripts

Sandra Sider
Barbara Obrist
Copyright Date: 1997
Pages: 240
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zthm
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  • Book Info
    Bibliography of Emblematic Manuscripts
    Book Description:

    Multiple indices provide full access to the manuscript descriptions: topics and genres, titles, artists, translators, dedicatees, additional names, provenance (including dealers and auction houses), dates of production, and places of production. All shelfmarks are listed separately by collection and city, keyed to the entry number for each manuscript. Many entries include notes of iconographic, artistic, or literary interest. A lengthy secondary bibliography completes the volume.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-6650-7
    Subjects: Art & Art History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. FOREWORD
    (pp. ix-x)
    William S. Heckscher

    I consider it a privilege to write a foreword to Sandra Sider’sBibliography of Emblematic Manuscripts –for those with strong nerves in short: BEMA.

    In November of the year 1989, at the initiative of Irving Lavin, Sandra spoke at the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study, addressing a group of local scholars, and carefully as well as convicingly, she gave us an outline of her emblem-manuscript plans. The reader of her book will find it profitable to turn to the author’s “Introduction.”

    We should realize that – ever since Henry Green’sAlciati and his Book of Emblems(London,1872) – serious attempts have...

  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. xi-xii)
    Sandra Sider
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xiii-xv)

    To the above sentiments we can add that bibliographic work on emblematic manuscripts requires perspicacity, perseverance, and a perverse ability to codify and simplify an incredibly diverse collection of material (none of which qualities we possessed in equal measure). We have cast our nets wide and deep, hauling in a few old shoes, monstrous forms, mythological creatures, and unknown pearls, along with the expected emblematic fish.

    Manuscript cataloguers, especially of illustrated material, often must present complex objects in an overly simplified form. The cataloguer not only must assemble information describing each manuscript in an organized fashion, but must then arrange...

  6. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. xvi-xx)
  7. Bibliography of Emblematic Manuscripts
    (pp. 1-132)
  8. LOCATION OF MANUSCRIPTS BY CITY
    (pp. 133-145)
  9. Indices
    (pp. 146-173)
  10. SECONDARY BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 174-184)
  11. Plates
    (pp. 185-218)