Where to Watch Birds in South America

Where to Watch Birds in South America

Nigel Wheatley
Copyright Date: 1995
Pages: 431
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7ztq1s
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    Where to Watch Birds in South America
    Book Description:

    A unique field guide and reference,Where to Watch Birds in South Americais designed to help the avid birder and the general wildlife enthusiast organize eventful journeys throughout the richest continent for birds, where the species number over three thousand. This book covers more than two hundred of the best sites for birdwatching, and includes the archipelagos of Trinidad and Tobago, the Galapagos and Falkland Islands, the Netherland Antilles, and part of Antarctica. The reader will find details of every species that is endemic to particular countries, and will learn where and when best to see such birds as the scarlet ibis, Andean condor, harpy eagle, sunbittern, macaw, toucan, jacamar, antbird, and cotinga. The text is enhanced by nearly one hundred maps and fifty line drawings. There are even hints as to where species not seen for decades may be rediscovered.

    This guide begins with an introduction to the continent and its birds then deals with particular countries and archipelagos. The site details include bird lists, a list of other wildlife present, and the latest advice on where to look for birds. For the traveler, there is information on transport, accommodations, safety, and health, and answers to various strategic questions: Which countries support the most species? How many sites must be visited to see most of them? How long does this take? When is the best time to go? Whether a first-time visitor to South America or a seasoned traveler there, the reader will find this guide immensely useful in making the most out of the trip.

    Originally published in 1994.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-6401-0
    Subjects: Zoology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-10)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 11-12)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 13-19)

    This book evolved from the questions I found myself asking when I began to plan my first trip to South America. I had arranged to go with three other birders so everyone’s interests had to be taken into account. Where should we go to look for the birds we considered to be ‘megas’; the birds that epitomise the continent: Torrent Duck, Agami Heron, Scarlet Ibis, Andean Condor, Harpy Eagle, Sungrebe, Sunbittern, Magellanic Plover, seedsnipes, Andean Avocet, Diademed Sandpiper-Plover, Inca Tern, macaws, Hoatzin, jacamars, toucans, White-plumed Antbird, cotingas, especially ‘blue ones’, fruiteaters and cock-of-therocks, and tanagers? Which countries held a good...

  5. INTRODUCTION TO BIRDING IN SOUTH AMERICA
    (pp. 20-29)

    South America isthebird continent. More than 3,000 species, almost a third of the world’s birds, have been recorded in the thirteen countries and four archipelagos that comprise the region. That is 1,100 more birds than in the Orient, 800 more than in Africa, and over 2,000 more than in the Palearctic, the Nearctic, and Australasia.

    Based onBirds of the World: A Check List(Fourth Edition), 1991, andSupplements 1 and 2,by James Clements, a total of 3,083 species have been recorded in South America. Over 800 (819) of these species also occur outside the continent, mainly...

  6. CONSERVATION
    (pp. 30-31)

    Over 95% of Brazil’s original Atlantic forest has been destroyed. In 1988 alone nearly 50,000 km² of Amazonian lowland rainforest was destroyed by deliberate fires. Over 50% of Ecuador's remaining forest may be lost by the year 2000. Nearly half of Colombia’s endemic birds are threatened with extinction. These sad statistics merely underline what most of us already know: many South American birds and their habitats are disappearing fast.

    A ceaselessly increasing human population is putting severe pressure on the planet Earth. Currently we are spoiling our home and the birds’ home, destroying it even, and for what? Improved quality...

  7. GENERAL TIPS
    (pp. 32-32)

    A basic understanding of Spanish would be an asset in virtually all South American countries, although it is possible to struggle through most countries by picking up the language as you go along. In Brazil, however, a form of Portuguese is the most widely spoken language and it is especially difficult to get by there without some understanding. An 'understanding' unfortunately means being able to comprehend the answer as well as stating the question correctly. Early morning is usually the best time for birding anywhere in the world and South America is no exception, although this continent is rather special...

  8. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 33-34)
  9. MAPS
    (pp. 35-36)
  10. ARGENTINA
    (pp. 37-76)
  11. BOLIVIA
    (pp. 77-100)
  12. BRAZIL
    (pp. 101-154)
  13. CHILE
    (pp. 155-176)
  14. COLOMBIA
    (pp. 177-204)
  15. ECUADOR
    (pp. 205-255)
  16. THE FALKLAND ISLANDS
    (pp. 256-262)
  17. THE GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS
    (pp. 263-271)
  18. GUYANA
    (pp. 272-280)
  19. GUYANE
    (pp. 281-288)
  20. NETHERLAND ANTILLES
    (pp. 289-292)
  21. PARAGUAY
    (pp. 293-304)
  22. PERU
    (pp. 305-344)
  23. SURINAME
    (pp. 345-350)
  24. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
    (pp. 351-360)
  25. URUGUAY
    (pp. 361-365)
  26. VENEZUELA
    (pp. 366-401)
  27. ANTARCTICA
    (pp. 402-407)
  28. CALENDAR
    (pp. 408-408)
  29. USEFUL ADDRESSES
    (pp. 409-409)
  30. USEFUL GENERAL BOOKS
    (pp. 410-410)
  31. REQUEST
    (pp. 411-411)
  32. INDEX OF SPECIES
    (pp. 412-431)