Ariosto's Bitter Harmony

Ariosto's Bitter Harmony: Crisis and Evasion in the Italian Renaissance

ALBERT RUSSELL ASCOLI
Copyright Date: 1987
Pages: 448
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7ztqg2
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  • Book Info
    Ariosto's Bitter Harmony
    Book Description:

    Focusing on the fundamental Ariostan pairing of education and madness, with all its implications for poetry, Professor Ascoli generates a global reading of the greatest literary work of the Italian Renaissance

    Originally published in 1987.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5834-7
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. NOTE ON TRANSLATIONS
    (pp. xi-2)
  5. 1 THE ORLANDO FURIOSO AND THE POETRY OF CRISIS
    (pp. 3-42)

    The famous “sorriso” of Ariosto; the remote, fantastic settings and events of his narration; the remarkable fluidity of the “ottava d’oro”: all of these have seemed to thwart from the beginning any attempt to find in theOrlando Furiosoa sense of the problematic in poetry and history, a troubled awareness of the interrelated crises of faith, of politics, and of culture which cry out in the principal documents and events of Italy in the earlyCinquecento.¹ The painfully acquired political stability and independence of the Italian peninsula in the 1400s was shaken in 1494 with the invasion of Charles...

  6. 2 CRITICAL READINGS OF THE ORLANDO FURIOSO
    (pp. 43-120)

    The first impulse of this reader and this reading ofOrlando Furiosois formalist a rarely repressed tendency to the pleasures of close textual analysis Nonetheless, recent critical events have made it very difficult to move directly to a thematic and/or structural interpretation of the poem’s treatment of human selfhood The last twenty years have seen the development of strong concepts of intertextuality, along with, more recently still, the emergence of a modified, “new,” historicism A literary text, we feel compelled to recognize, is composed of readings—it is the composite transcription and revision of the classical, medieval, and Renaissance...

  7. 3 ALLEGORY AND EDUCATION AT THE ANTIPODES
    (pp. 121-257)

    In spite of the internal and external pressures placed on the reader to accept theFuriosoas an escapist flight out of the city into theselva, out of the present into the past, out of familiar geographies into alien and fantastic landscapes, out of reality and into “pure” imagination, there is reason to believe that Ariosto is being disingenuous, both inSatiravi and in the letter to the Doge, about the lack of complexity and seriousness in his poem. If he addresses the question of Renaissance theories and practices of poetic education explicitly and directly only inSatira...

  8. 4 CASSANDRA’S VEIL AND THE POET’S FOLLY
    (pp. 258-394)

    When, after Ruggiero’s ostentatious aerial departure, Astolfo leaves the island of Logistilla, he does so under the guidance of Andronica (Fortitude) and by far more conventional means than his friend. He does take with him, however, two magical gifts which can be used to master any situation: a book which penetrates all magical illusions and a horn, distant relative of Roland’s Oliphant, whose sound terrifies even the bravest of men or women (xv.13–14). When he finally reaches Europe again, after a series of adventures, he is, like Ruggiero, lured by an Atlantean phantom into the labyrinth of desire and...

  9. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 395-410)
  10. INDEX
    (pp. 411-432)
  11. Back Matter
    (pp. 433-433)