The Social Cinema of Jean Renoir

The Social Cinema of Jean Renoir

CHRISTOPHER FAULKNER
Copyright Date: 1986
Pages: 222
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zv6zh
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  • Book Info
    The Social Cinema of Jean Renoir
    Book Description:

    Reinterpreting twelve of Renoir's best-known works, Professor Faulkner attributes their qualities not to the director's unified sensibility but to varying social and historical circumstances.

    Originally published in 1986.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5473-8
    Subjects: Film Studies

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-2)
  4. INTRODUCTION FOR ETHNOGRAPHY
    (pp. 3-16)

    Jean Renoir is one of the most internationally popular and widely respected of film makers. At his death in 1979 at the age of eighty-four he left behind him forty films directed over forty-five years from 1924 to 1969. Certain individual films (likeLa Grande IllusionandLa Règie du jeu) stand out, but the whole body of his work has been treated to great critical acclaim. In an extraordinarily productive lifetime, Renoir also wrote four novels, a couple of plays, an autobiography, a biography of his famous father, the painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and a provocative collection of incidental writings....

  5. ONE PROTEST AND PASSION: LA CHIENNE, BOUDU SAUVE DES EAUX, TONI
    (pp. 17-57)

    La Chienneis a film about property; that is to say, it is a film that illustrates how the economic forces of society determine personal and social relations. It is an unusually topical work for the French film industry of 1931, quite different from the plethora of rude farces (likeOn purge bébé, which Renoir also directed in 1931) or romantic comedies (such as Renoir’sChotard et Cie. of 1933) that monopolised French screens during the period.La Chienneis Renoir’s first major work. It marks his graduation from the apprentice works of the twenties, their avant-garde follies and their...

  6. TWO AN IDEOLOGY OF POLITICS: LE CRIME DE M. LANGE, LA VIE EST A NOUS, LA GRANDE ILLUSION, LA REGLE DU JEU
    (pp. 58-122)

    Renoir’s contact with the French Left onLe Crime de M. Lange(released January 1936) was effected by Jacques Prévert and the October Group, a class-conscious proletarian theatre company formed in 1932. Renoir could not have been unaware of the political events of the year previous to the making ofLe Crime de M. Lange.¹ From the earliest days of 1934 various right-wing organisations staged nightly demonstrations in the Paris streets protesting government corruption, principally the Stavisky affair. These demonstrations culminated in the riots of 6 February. On the 9th of the month the Communists and workers’ groups responded with...

  7. CHAPTER THREE INTERREGNUM: THIS LAND IS MINE, THE SOUTHERNER
    (pp. 123-161)

    In six-and-one-half years Renoir made five feature films in Hollywood (and one documentary in New York for the Office of War Information,Salute to France, 1944), and worked for three different studios (Fox, Universal, RKO), as well as producing independently. Renoir’s attitude towards Hollywood, like his attitude towards America, has always been ambivalent. On the one hand he was grateful for the opportunity to make films, on the other he was dissatisfied and ill at ease with the prevailing system of production:

    Without regretting my first American films, I know for sure that they represent nothing of my ideal….

    America...

  8. FOUR AN IDEOLOGY OF AESTHETICS: THE RIVER, THE GOLDEN COACH, FRENCH CANCAN
    (pp. 162-198)

    Against the claim that “Renoir’s films add up to one immensely rich and varied single work,”¹ I have argued that Jean Renoir has had two distinct careers. These two careers are distinguished by different functions for art and different roles for the artist. It is that second career, that second maturity as a film maker, to which I now want to address myself. The films of this second maturity, eight features over eighteen years, fromThe River(1951) toLe Petit théâtre de Jean Renoir(1969), demonstrate new thematic concerns and new stylistic preoccupations consistent with Renoir’s self-confessed change in...

  9. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 199-204)
  10. INDEX
    (pp. 205-210)
  11. Back Matter
    (pp. 211-212)