Averroes' Middle Commentaries on Aristotle's Categories and De Interpretatione

Averroes' Middle Commentaries on Aristotle's Categories and De Interpretatione

TRANSLATED, WITH NOTES AND INTRODUCTIONS, BY Charles E. Butterworth
Copyright Date: 1983
Pages: 214
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvgfv
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  • Book Info
    Averroes' Middle Commentaries on Aristotle's Categories and De Interpretatione
    Book Description:

    Ibn Rushd (1126-1198), better known as Averroes, is said to be the greatest among the Muslim commentators on Aristotle and is especially known for his influence on medieval Christendom and on medieval and Renaissance science and philosophy. This volume presents a readable translation of his middle commentaries on Aristotle's Categories and De Interpretation--the first of his middle commentaries on Aristotle's logical treatises.

    Originally published in 1983.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5340-3
    Subjects: Philosophy

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-xx)
  4. AVERROES’ MIDDLE COMMENTARY ON ARISTOTLE’S CATEGORIES
    • INTRODUCTION
      (pp. 3-18)

      If the number of times a question is asked is any indication of its significance, anyone introducing others to a commentary such as this must begin by stating whether it contains anything that differs markedly from the original exposition. Clearly, the very tone of the question suggests that there is no reason to bother with a commentary if it offers nothing new. Yet for the sake of serious learning and perhaps even for the sake of true philosophical inquiry, both the question and the inference need to be resisted. Novelty, after all, has only recently come to be admitted as...

    • THE ORDER OF THE ARGUMENT
      (pp. 19-24)
    • THE TEXT
      (pp. 25-88)

      1. The most illustrious jurist, the accomplished scholar, Abū al-Walīd ibn Rushd, may God be pleased with him, said: the purpose of this discussion is to comment¹ upon the ideas² contained in Aristotle’s books on the art of logic and to study them insofar as we are able, as has been our custom with the rest of his books. We will begin with the first of his books on this art, which is theCategories. Thus, we say that in general this book is divided into three parts.

      The first part is on the order of an introduction to what...

  5. AVERROES’ MIDDLE COMMENTARY ON ARISTOTLE’S DE INTERPRETATIONE
    • INTRODUCTION
      (pp. 91-118)

      When Averroes’Middle Commentary on Aristotle’s De Interpretationeis compared with hisMiddle Commentary on Aristotle’s Categories,a number of striking differences come to light. First, whereas he begins his discussion of Aristotle’sCategoriesby explaining that he intends to comment upon that work as he has done on other works by Aristotle, he says nothing of the sort here. Secondly, although he carefully explains the structure of Aristotle’sCategoriesand how the work is divided, as well as what Aristotle sought to accomplish in each part, he says nothing about the structure of theDe Interpretatione. He simply divides...

    • THE ORDER OF THE ARGUMENT
      (pp. 119-124)
    • THE TEXT
      (pp. 125-188)

      1. He said: we ought first to say what a noun and verb are. Then, after that, we will say what affirmation and negation are and, in general, what the judgment and the sentence, which is the genus of affirmation and negation, are.

      2. Thus, we say that spoken utterances signify primarily the ideas that are in the soul, while written letters signify primarily these utterances. Just as written letters—I mean, script—are not one and the same for all nations, so too, the utterances by which ideas are expressed are not one and the same for all nations....

  6. INDEX
    (pp. 189-193)
  7. Back Matter
    (pp. 194-194)