Stobi

Stobi: Results of the Joint American-Yugoslav Archaeological Investigations, 1970-1981: Volume 1: The Hellenistic and Roman Pottery

Virginia R. Anderson-Stojanović
JAMES WISEMAN
Copyright Date: 1992
Pages: 258
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvj5w
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  • Book Info
    Stobi
    Book Description:

    This book inaugurates a series of volumes that will present the results of more than twenty years of research by a team of American and Yugoslav scholars at Stobi, an ancient city of northern Macedonia. The research was multidisciplinary, and methodological innovations augmented more traditional methodologies of archaeological, historical, and art historical research. The series illuminates numerous aspects of urban life at Stobi, which spanned some nine centuries, from the early Hellenistic period until the end of the sixth century A.D. This first volume of the series is also the first comprehensive study of Hellenistic and Roman pottery in Macedonia. Its detailed presentation of the types and quantities of imported wares and local products together with a series of well-dated contexts documents the economic history of Stobi as well as the broader region of Macedonia. It will interest social and economic historians, as well as archaeologists and pottery specialists.

    Originally published in 1992.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5291-8
    Subjects: Archaeology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-x)
  3. LIST OF FIGURES
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. LIST OF TABLES
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  5. LIST OF PLATES
    (pp. xv-xx)
  6. FOREWORD
    (pp. xxi-xxvi)
    James Wiseman

    Stobi has long held for scholars a special position among the urban centers of the Roman Empire because of some unusual, even unique, features of its historical evolution. It is the onlyoppidum avium Romanorumrecorded among the Greek-speaking provinces,¹ a special rank it may have achieved during the Civil Wars of the Late Republic.² It later was elevated to the rank ofmunicipium,³ an honored status shared in the Greek East, so far as we know, only with Coela in the Thracian Chersonesus.⁴ What is more, among themunicipialocated outside Italy, only Stobi is known to have possessed...

  7. PREFACE
    (pp. xxvii-xxx)
  8. LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xxxi-2)
  9. 1 INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-7)

    Stobi is located in the Vardar (the ancient Axius) river valley of northern Macedonia at the point where the Crna river (the ancient Erigon) flows into the Vardar (Pl. 1). It was an important center along this north-south route between Greece and central Europe from early times until it was abandoned late in the 6th century after Christ. The major highway to Greece still passes the site of Stobi today, and the Orient Express runs alongside.¹ The variety of imported ceramics at Stobi and the quantity of particular wares present at various periods in the city’s history are reflections of...

  10. 2 THE LOCAL CERAMIC TRADITION
    (pp. 8-12)

    The earliest evidence for local production of ceramics at Stobi comes from the Potter’s Workshop excavated below the narthex of the Central Basilica.¹ The presence of moulds made of local clays (nos. 7–9 below), and of fragments of imported pottery (49, 222 in Chapter 3), along with local imitations in the fills asssociated with the kilnlike structure, suggests pottery manufacture by the late 2nd/early 1st centuries B.C.

    There is evidence for continued local production throughout the city’s history, as moulds and stamps (nos. 1, 2, 10–18) have been discovered in contexts of various periods. A small circular structure...

  11. 3 THE HELLENISTIC AND ROMAN POTTERY
    (pp. 13-143)

    The tradition of a gray wheelmade pottery can be traced back a long way—in fact, to the Minyan Ware of the Middle Bronze Age Aegean.¹ Gray pottery and bucchero are also found on Lesbos, in northwestern Asia Minor, and western Phrygia from the Early Bronze Age down through the early Roman period.² Excavations further to the west on the Black Sea, at Histria,³ in Thrace,⁴ and nearby Thasos,⁵ and in Macedonia⁶ show that gray wares appear sporadically in the Bronze Age, were popular in the Iron Age, and continued to be so down through the Hellenistic period. In Macedonia...

  12. 4 CHRONOLOGY AND DEPOSITS
    (pp. 144-183)

    To establish the pottery chronology presented here, a selection of dated deposits ranging from the period of earliest documented occupation at the site in the 3rd century B.C. to the abandonment of the city in the 6th century A.C. were chosen for study. In addition to selecting those deposits with reliable stratigraphy and with relatively well established date, as much as possible we chose deposits with large amounts of pottery. All the pottery in these deposits was studied and quantified with the aid of computer analysis.¹ Descriptions of the core deposits follow these introductory comments.

    In addition to the pottery...

  13. 5 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
    (pp. 184-194)

    The aim of this study has been to establish a preliminary typology and chronology of the Hellenistic and Roman pottery at Stobi. It should not be considered the final word, and, as more material is published from chronologically secure deposits, it will need refinement.¹

    The location of the ancient city of Stobi at a major crossroads is clearly reflected in the diversity of ceramic imports throughout the city’s history. The more heavily traveled road between Thessalonica and Sirmium through Naissus, which connected the east with central Europe, crossed the Erigon at Stobi; the other road ran between Serdica in Thrace...

  14. APPENDIX 1. THE POTTER’S SHOP
    (pp. 195-196)
  15. APPENDIX 2. PETROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CERAMIC SAMPLES
    (pp. 197-202)
    Georgeana Little
  16. CONCORDANCE
    (pp. 203-214)
  17. INDEX
    (pp. 215-217)
  18. Greek Words and Names
    (pp. 217-217)
  19. Latin Potters’ Names
    (pp. 218-218)
  20. PLATES
    (pp. None)