Shades of Green

Shades of Green: Environmental Attitudes in Canada and Around the World

Alan Frizzell
Jon H. Pammett
Copyright Date: 1997
Pages: 215
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zx8q
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  • Book Info
    Shades of Green
    Book Description:

    Is there a real community of interest on the state of the environment that transcends national boundaries? An answer to this vital question will ultimately determine the success or failure of initiatives where international co-operation and co-ordination are essential, such as atmospheric or water pollution controls. Shades of Green, volume two of the ISSP (International Social Survey Programme) series, analyzes data from identical surveys conducted in 22 countries and tackles a wide range of attitudes and priorities. Expectations of government in terms of environmental protection, a comparison of Canada-U.S. results, the level of knowledge on environmental issues from country to country, the perceived role for science in solving ecological problems, and attitudinal differences between the West and states of the former Soviet Union - these issues have serious implications for the environmental movement and government policies worldwide.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-8188-3
    Subjects: Environmental Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. LIST OF TABLES
    (pp. vi-viii)
  4. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. 1 ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES AROUND THE WORLD
    (pp. 1-18)
    Alan Frizzell

    THERE IS GENERAL AGREEMENT that concern about the environment has risen over the last three decades. Most ascribe this development to the activities of environmental groups which have not only changed public perceptions, but have forced some governments to respond through rhetoric and policy. Yet the heady hope of the early environmental movements that they could change the substantive nature of the political debate has not materialized, largely due to the fact that they have failed to gain political power in national legislatures. True there have been successes, notably in Germany, but even there as an opposition force their effectiveness...

  6. 2 CANADIAN OPINIONS ON ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY: PATTERNS AND DETERMINANTS
    (pp. 19-54)
    Scott Bennett

    THE PRIMARY PURPOSE of this chapter is to provide a picture of Canadian opinions on the environment and possible influences on those opinions. Analysis of these opinions and influences focuses attention on the role Canadians would prefer government to play in the realm of environmental policy. Such policy opinions are the primary dependent variables in our research. Other variables to be considered are: general policy concerns; specific environmental concerns; knowledge of the environment as a policy area; general systems of belief; and, of course, a variety of conventional socio-economic variables.

    After looking at the simple univariate patterns in the main...

  7. 3 CANADA’S GREEN PLAN: AN EXPRESSION OF THE POPULAR WILL?
    (pp. 55-74)
    Peter Morrison

    PUBLIC CONCERN about environmental issues in Canada has gone through substantial tidal changes (Doern and Conway, 1994). The peak in environmental awareness in the late 1980s received expression through a major new policy initiative. On December 11, 1990 the Progressive Conservative government committed $3 billion in new funding to the Green Plan, an initiative that was billed as a comprehensive national strategy and action plan for sustainable development.

    The Green Plan and its impact have received relatively little attention in the scholarly literature. A recent series of articles (Hoberg and Harrison, 1994; Laplante, 1995; Harrison and Hoberg, 1996) has explored...

  8. 4 GREEN WORDS AND PUBLIC DEEDS: ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS AND CITIZEN RESPONSE IN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
    (pp. 75-104)
    Harold D. Clarke and Marianne C. Stewart

    IN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES, as elsewhere, recognition that problems of pollution, global warming, nuclear waste disposal, and the destruction of irreplaceable eco-systems are serious has prompted growing concern about public willingness to safeguard a threatened world environment. People’s perceptions of environmental hazards can be an important source of their attitudes toward and actions on environmental protection. This analysis utilizes data on public beliefs, attitudes and behaviour in Canada and the United States gathered in 1993 by the International Social Survey Programme. The chapter reviews basic features of American and Canadian political culture that might prompt cross-national differences in...

  9. 5 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE
    (pp. 105-128)
    Tom W. Smith

    IN RECENT YEARS both international organizations, such as the United Nations and the International Social Science Council (Pawlik, 1991; “Human Dimensions,” 1994), and American bodies, such as the National Science Foundation and the National Academy of Sciences (Miller, 1992; “Research Needs,” 1994) have stressed a need for research on the “human dimensions of global environmental change.”¹ Many important environmental changes such as the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, and increases in local toxicity and radiation levels are in large part the product of human activities and technologies, (burning fossil fuels, manufacturing chlorofluorocarbons, discharges from industry and weapons production). Moreover, dealing with...

  10. 6 ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN, RELIGIOUS BELIEF AND FAITH IN SCIENCE: COMPLEMENTARY OR ANTAGONISTIC VALUES?
    (pp. 129-146)
    Jon H. Pammett

    THE HUMAN OBSESSION with science and technology as the engine of progress began with the Industrial Revolution. It was symbolized by a fascination with steam power and the development of the factory as the theatre of production (Stearns, 1993; Lane, 1978). Science gave a new, material, dimension to ideas of progress in the areas of agriculture, transportation and manufacturing (Spadafora 1990, 57-58). Prior to the development of mass production and the advent of heavy industry, there certainly were advances in techniques of processing materials, transportation and the standard of living. But they were not seen as a direct result of...

  11. 7 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSCIOUSNESS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: SOME EAST-WEST COMPARISONS
    (pp. 147-168)
    Joan DeBardeleben

    IT IS OFTEN ASSUMED that environmental concern is a luxury of affluence. While environmental pollution often affects the less affluent more strongly, other economic pressures may place environmental protection low on their scale of economic priorities (Lowe 1991, 111-14). This dynamic may affect entire nations as well as individuals. Those worse off may not be able to afford to move to less polluted surroundings or protect themselves from environmental hazards by consuming clean food and water. Less wealthy societies are less able to fund environmental amelioration; polluting industries may also migrate to these countries if environmental regulations are not sufficiently...

  12. APPENDIX: DATA FREQUENCIES
    (pp. 169-202)
  13. THE CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 203-204)