Preparing for Post-Secondary Education

Preparing for Post-Secondary Education: New Roles for Governments and Families

ROBERT SWEET
PAUL ANISEF
Copyright Date: 2005
Pages: 440
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt8064z
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  • Book Info
    Preparing for Post-Secondary Education
    Book Description:

    The contributors begin by examining changes to national and international educational funding policies and the relationship between public and private costs. They focus on the role of families in marshaling the necessary resources, demonstrating that access to post-secondary education is also determined by social capital. The authors conclude that new partnerships between parents, the state, and schools are redefining the various players' roles and commitments to the educational futures of Canadian children.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-7317-8
    Subjects: Finance

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. Tables and Figures
    (pp. vii-x)
  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xi-2)
  5. 1 Changing Partnerships: Families, Schools, and Governments
    (pp. 3-14)
    ROBERT SWEET and PAUL ANISEF

    Parents have always planned and prepared for their children’s educational futures. Where their goals included post-secondary education, the requisite financial resources were set aside and time and energy were committed to the equally important matter of ensuring the child’s successful progression through the school system. Both undertakings involved partnerships. The first was a financial partnership with government that acknowledged the state’s obligations to meet at least a portion of the individual’s post-secondary study costs. The second was that established by parents with their children’s teacher and school. Parents continue to plan and prepare for their children’s educational futures, but the...

  6. PART ONE ACCESS TO PSE:: PUBLIC AND PRIVATE COSTS
    • 2 Access to Post-Secondary Education: An Analytical Framework and New Evidence on Background Effects
      (pp. 17-54)
      ROSS FINNIE

      Many important changes have occurred in the Canadian post-secondary education system over the last decade: substantial increases in tuition rates (Junor and Usher, 2002); shifts in the shares of student financial aid given in the form of grants and loans; increases and then stagnation in student borrowing limits; rising debt loads, the introduction and expansion of assistance in repayment and debt remission programs; the birth of the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation; and a widening of education-related tax credits.¹ On the other side of the coin, the financial support provided by provincial ministries to colleges and universities has generally been cut...

    • 3 Accessibility and Student Debt: The Shift from Public to Private Support in Canada
      (pp. 55-86)
      STEPHEN BELL and PAUL ANISEF

      The benefits accruing to young people who access and participate in higher education are well known and consistently documented through studies conducted by the federal government (Lin, Sweet, Anisef, and Schuetze, 2001). Sustaining access to post-secondary education in Canada has been important for a variety of reasons, including the human capital argument; the notion of providing equality of opportunity to social and cultural groups previously locked out of universities and colleges; and the increased importance of credentials in a globalized economy. Thus, an increasing proportion of the primary university age group of 18 to 24-year-olds choose university over other activities....

    • 4 Paying for a University Education: A Comparison of Public and Private Study Costs in Canada, Australia, and Selected European Countries
      (pp. 87-125)
      STEPHEN BELL and GLEN A. JONES

      Who should pay for higher education? While the state continues to be the major funder of university operating costs in most Western systems, the question of the appropriate balance between public (state) and private support for the costs of higher education has become an important public policy issue in many jurisdictions. This question of balance emerges in every area of university activity, including research (government versus private sector sponsorship), service (public service versus fee-for-service arrangements), and teaching.

      This chapter focuses on the balance between the public and private costs associated with studying at university. Our objective is to analyse the...

    • 5 Financing Lifelong Learning: The Potential and Actual Role of Individual Learning Accounts
      (pp. 126-146)
      HANS G. SCHUETZE

      Lifelong learning has gained prominence on the policy agendas of many countries and academic literature has focused on many aspects of a system of lifelong learning. In spite of the abundance of articles, books, and policy reports on different aspects of lifelong learning, until recently few studies considered how such a system could be financed. After an initial discussion in the 1970s and early 1980s (Stoikov, 1975; Levin and Schuetze, 1983) the theme was not taken up again until recently, when a number of economists and one of the international organizations that had been an early promoter of lifelong learning...

  7. PART TWO FAMILIES AND PSE PLANNING
    • 6 A Revolution of Expectations? Three Key Trends in the SAEP Data
      (pp. 149-165)
      SCOTT DAVIES

      The new economy is said to require historically high levels of skill which put a premium on higher education (Smith, 2001). This economy is likely to dramatically re-shape the labour market, rewarding workers with better skills, advantaging recent post-secondary graduates, and reducing the wages of those without advanced schooling.¹

      What will be the impact on Canadian universities and colleges? Expansion has already been pervasive over the past half century, as higher education evolved from an “elite” to a “mass” system, placing Canada among the world leaders in post-secondary enrolments (Dc Broucker and Underwood, 1998; Guppy and Davies, 1998). This expansion...

    • 7 Distributing Scarce Resources: Parental Investment in Their Children’s Post-Secondary Education
      (pp. 166-200)
      VICTOR THIESSEN and E. DIANNE LOOKER

      Canadian parents hold high expectations for their children’s ultimate educational attainment. Recent increases in the costs associated with post-secondary education and the shifting balance away from the state and towards individual and familial responsibility for these costs creates dilemmas for families whose resources are limited in attempting to implement their aspirations. It also makes it necessary for them to take early and concrete steps to maximize the chances that their aspirations for their children’s education are fulfilled. These steps are not limited to savings, but can take the form of encouraging their children’s academic performance through a variety of activities...

    • 8 The Effects of Region and Gender on Educational Planning in Canadian Families
      (pp. 201-221)
      PAUL ANISEF, GEORGE FREMPONG and ROBERT SWEET

      While the government of Canada attempts to engage and prepare all Canadians for the emerging knowledge-based economy, concerns are raised over the differences between rural and urban communities, such as the absence of university education services in rural areas, which discourages parents from rural communities from preparing their children for a university education. Furthermore, the rising cost of post-secondary education and the increasing burden on parents to plan ahead for their child’s post-secondary education decreases the chances of children from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds acquiring a post-secondary education. Recognizing the influence of a child’s school outcome on parents’ educational decisions, in...

    • 9 Family Structure, Child Well-being, and Post-Secondary Saving: The Effect of Social Capital on the Child’s Acquisition of Human Capital
      (pp. 222-248)
      JAMES M. WHITE, SHEILA MARSHALL and JAMIE R. WOOD

      Families play an important role in shaping children’s educational and social adjustment and subsequent attainment. A source of variation between family environments that is frequently included in assessments of children’s academic and social outcomes is family structure. This chapter focuses on the argument that family structure predicts children’s academic and social adjustment and that parents of children who are doing well socially and academically are more likely to save for their children’s post-secondary education. We employ Coleman’s (1990) rational choice theory to develop a conceptual model and then test the proposed relationships with data from the Survey of Academic and...

    • 10 Parental Involvement in the Creation of Home-Learning Environments: Gender and Class Patterns
      (pp. 249-272)
      NANCY MANDELL and ROBERT SWEET

      Two trends have emerged in Canadian education in the past twenty years. The first is the greater value assigned to a post-secondary education (PSE). Almost half of the new jobs created in the next five years will require at least seventeen years of education. Canadians understand that some post-secondary education is essential to secure a “good” job (Duffy, Glenday, and Pupo, 1997). The increasing importance of further education and training is reflected in the rising educational aspirations of teenagers and their parents (Davies, this volume; Bibby, 2001). Along with rising aspirations, post-secondary participation rates are increasing (Bouchard and Zhao, 2000;...

    • 11 Exploring Limits to Parents’ Involvement in Homework
      (pp. 273-288)
      ROBERT SWEET and NANCY MANDELL

      The period during which children move from elementary to middle school is critical to their educational futures. A smooth transition from the neighbourhood elementary school to the larger middle or high school can be difficult: classes typically are larger, the curriculum is more diverse and challenging, and there are heightened expectations regarding personal autonomy and self-regulated study behaviour. Parents, particularly mothers, play an important role in facilitating their children’s adjustment to these changed conditions. During this period many establish closer ties with the school, become more knowledgeable about their children’s educational progress, and become more directly involved in their homework...

    • 12 Educational Planning in Families: Issues and Future Research Directions
      (pp. 289-302)
      PAUL ANISEF and ROBERT SWEET

      Important economic, social, and cultural changes in post-industrial and knowledge-based societies necessitate a better understanding of the role played by parents in planning and preparing their children for post-secondary education. Most Canadian parents now assume that their children must acquire a post-secondary education if they are to achieve some measure of success in their lives. Certainly the link between higher levels of education and meaningful, well-remunerated employment is generally acknowledged. But parents have also come to understand that the route to post-secondary education is a great deal more uncertain than it was in the past. This uncertainty results from a...

  8. Index
    (pp. 303-304)