Bishop's University, 1843-1970

Bishop's University, 1843-1970

CHRISTOPHER NICHOLL
Copyright Date: 1994
Pages: 392
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt8077q
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  • Book Info
    Bishop's University, 1843-1970
    Book Description:

    Most Canadian universities were created in response to society's perceived need for men and women trained in the professions, or at least prepared to take up gainful employment that contributes to the national economy. In contrast, Bishop's was inspired by John Henry Newman's idea of the university as an academic community in which undergraduates might form their opinions and learn to defend them by living among those whose interests and competence include a wide range of disciplines. The goal of such an education is to produce what Newman calls a "philosophical habit of mind" an ability to think which, being independent of any particular subject, is the instrument of all.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-6466-4
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  6. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xvii-2)
  7. PROLOGUE
    (pp. 3-12)

    Bishop’s University is older than Confederation. In 1992 Canada celebrated 125 years of the union of British North America. A year later, Bishop’s celebrated its sesquicentennial—its 150th anniversary.

    The University was founded to serve the English-speaking community in the territory which at present forms the province of Quebec, and until very recently Bishop’s has depended almost entirely on Quebeckers for financial and moral support. Since Quebec’s English-speaking community has been and remains unique in the Canadian experience, it is necessary to set the scene with a description of that community and the environment in which it was developing during...

  8. CHAPTER ONE THE FOUNDERS
    (pp. 13-29)

    Bishop’s University owes its foundation chiefly to the energy and initiative of two remarkable men, G.J. Mountain, third Anglican Bishop of Quebec, and Lucius Doolittle, missionary priest to Sherbrooke and Lennoxville under the auspices of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (SPG).

    George Jehoshaphat Mountain was the son of Bishop Jacob Mountain. The family was descended from Huguenots who had settled in Norwich, England, where George Mountain was born in 1789. He travelled to Quebec with his family at the time of his father’s appointment in 1793, and there he spent what seems to have...

  9. CHAPTER TWO PRINCIPAL NICOLLS: THE YEARS OF HOPE
    (pp. 30-52)

    Jasper Nicolls arrived in Quebec in August 1845, two months before his twenty-seventh birthday. After a thorough briefing by the bishop, and having renewed his acquaintance with many of the friends of his youth, he set out for Lennoxville, travelling by steamboat to Port St Francis and thence by stage coach to Sherbrooke.

    At Lennoxville Nicolls found his college housed in the least unsuitable building which the trustees had been able to find (on the site of the present Roman Catholic church). Henry Roe, one of the first students, described the quarters in which the principal greeted his flock at...

  10. CHAPTER THREE PRINCIPAL NICOLLS: THE YEARS OF TRIAL
    (pp. 53-88)

    In 1852 the railway from Montreal had reached Sherbrooke and Lennoxville; the following year the junction of the St Lawrence and Atlantic (SL&A) with the northward-building Atlantic and St Lawrence was achieved at Island Pond, Vermont. A year later, a Quebec City consortium completed a railway from Levis to connect with the SL&A at Richmond. Sherbrooke was thereby suddenly connected by rail with the two major centres of population in Lower Canada and with Portland, an ice-free port on the Atlantic ocean.

    The SL&A was the first Canadian railroad to traverse the Eastern Townships. Alexander Gait and his associates Samuel...

  11. CHAPTER FOUR THE SMALLEST DIMENSIONS
    (pp. 89-127)

    During the 25 years since Bishop’s had received its royal charter, the economy of the Eastern Townships had undergone remarkable development, and the character of the population had been transformed.

    The establishment under the Act of Union of an English-speaking majority in the new province of Canada had reduced the pressure to develop an English bastion in the Townships. Moreover, once the region was linked by rail to Portland, Quebec and Montreal, there was little economic reason for the BALC to promote further colonization of the St Francis tract. The company abandoned any vision it might once have had of...

  12. CHAPTER FIVE THE END OF THE BEGINNING
    (pp. 128-163)

    Corporation appointed James Pounder Whitney to replace Thomas Adams as principal in May 1900. Whitney had been a Foundation Scholar of King’s College, Cambridge, from which he graduated with a double first in mathematics and history in 1881. Priested in 1885, he combined lecturing in history at Owens College, Manchester, with pastoral duties in various parishes before then returning in 1895 to a college living at Milton (near Cambridge), tutorial work for his college, and the opportunity to pursue his interest in ecclesiastical history. When he came to Canada, Whitney’s scholarship had already been recognized by Lord Acton, Regius Professor...

  13. CHAPTER SIX THE REIGN OF PRINCIPAL McGREER
    (pp. 164-212)

    Arthur Huffman McGreer was born in Napanee, Ontario, on the 11th of August 1883. After graduating from the local high school, he matriculated at the University of Toronto. Though of Ulster stock the family preferred the churchmanship of Trinity College to that of Wycliffe, and it was from Trinity that he emerged in 1909 with a B.A., several academic prizes, and in priest’s orders. His first parish was the military establishment at Barriefield, near Kingston. He then went in 1911 to Montreal as assistant at Christ Church Cathedral. During the next three years he no doubt became acquainted with several...

  14. CHAPTER SEVEN TRANSITION
    (pp. 213-248)

    Basil Jones was appointed acting principal for the remainder of the 1947—48 session. In the wake of the traumatic events of 1947, the leaders of Corporation were anxious to reassure the bishops that the university remained an Anglican institution of which the Faculty of Divinity was an essential component. In this context, Jones’ scholarly reputation and the relations of mutual confidence he had established with many members of faculty and students might well have recommended him for permanent appointment. However, the great majority of the undergraduates were now registered in the Faculty of Arts and most trustees were determined...

  15. CHAPTER EIGHT THE WINDS OF CHANGE: 1960–70
    (pp. 249-294)

    From 1944 to 1959, under the Union Nationale government of Maurice Duplessis, the Roman Catholic Church had continued to control higher education in the French language in Quebec. The education of young men and some young women of the age of Bishop’s undergraduates was confided to the colleges classiques, which had cultivated the minds and formed the philosophy of the leaders of French Canada for over two hundred years. The Baccalauréat és Arts¹ conferred by these colleges was required for admission to the professional faculties in universities—Law, Medicine, and Theology—and to theGrands Séminairesin which the clergy...

  16. EPILOGUE
    (pp. 295-298)

    The crisis proved to be more severe and lasted much longer than anyone could have foreseen.

    In July 1971 the newly constituted Champlain Regional CEGEP, whose Lennoxville Campus was to share the grounds and facilities of Bishop’s University, took over the CEGEP years. Bishop’s agreed to teach the nontechnical college-level courses for Champlain during the 1971—72 session as an interim measure while Champlain recruited its own faculty. The hiving-off of the CEGEP enrolment left Bishop’s with a projected enrolment of less than 600 in the three university years in September 1972, and the ministry notified the university that for...

  17. APPENDIX ONE THE ACTS RELATING TO BISHOP’S UNIVERSITY
    (pp. 299-311)
  18. APPENDIX TWO THE CONTEXT OF THE BATTLE FOR THE CHARTER
    (pp. 312-316)
  19. APPENDIX THREE THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE
    (pp. 317-347)
  20. APPENDIX FOUR ENROLMENT STATISTICS
    (pp. 348-350)
  21. NOTES
    (pp. 351-366)
  22. INDEX
    (pp. 367-373)
  23. [Illustrations]
    (pp. None)