Sonic Experience

Sonic Experience: A Guide to Everyday Sounds

Jean-François Augoyard
Henry Torgue
Andra McCartney
David Paquette
Copyright Date: 2005
Pages: 230
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt80dmq
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Sonic Experience
    Book Description:

    In a multidisciplinary work spanning musicology, electro-acoustic composition, architecture, urban studies, communication, phenomenology, social theory, physics, and psychology, Jean-François Augoyard, Henry Torgue, and their associates at the Centre for Research on Sonic Space and the Urban Environment (CRESSON) in Grenoble, France, provide an alphabetical sourcebook of eighty sonic/auditory effects. Their accounts of sonic effects such as echo, anticipation, vibrato, and wha-wha integrate information about the objective physical spaces in which sounds occur with cultural contexts and individual auditory experience. Sonic Experience attempts to rehabilitate general acoustic awareness, combining accessible definitions and literary examples with more in-depth technical information for specialists.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-7691-9
    Subjects: Music

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. SONIC EFFECTS: THEMATIC LIST
    (pp. vii-x)
  4. SONIC EFFECTS: ALPHABETICAL LIST
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. FOREWORD
    (pp. xi-xvi)
    R. Murray Schafer

    Sonic Experienceis a stimulating and wide-ranging work by one of the most significant teams of soundscape researchers in the world today — one that has gathered around French social philosopher and phenomenologist Jean-François Augoyard at the Centre de recherche sur l’espace sonore et l’environment urbain (CRESSON) at the National School of Architecture of Grenoble. Published in French in 1995, with Italian edition appearing in 2004, this first English edition will fortunately make CRESSON’s innovative approach available to a larger readership.

    “Man lives in an uneasy ocean of air continually agitated by the disturbances called sound waves.” That statement, written by...

  6. TRANSLATORS’ NOTE
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  7. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. xix-2)
  8. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-18)

    Over the centuries, Western culture has relentlessly attempted to classify noise, music, and everyday sounds. Philosophers, authors, scholars, and musicians have worked to abstract and assess sounds on a scale of purity, musicality, and intelligibility. In contemporary opinion, cacophonous, thundering noise is taken to signify the malaise of an anti-human reliance on technology. Ordinary noises and mundane sounds that are not perceived as either annoying or musical are of no interest. Listening to other cultures will, however, reveal that the term “noise” does not automatically involve disturbance, and also that the term “music” does not possess a single universal meaning,...

  9. Guide to Sonic Effects
    (pp. 21-152)

    In music, a marking (usually abbreviated asAccel.) that indicates an acceleration in the speed of performance, and consequently an increase in the tempo of the piece. One task of a conductor is to determine the precise tempo of a work that he or she conducts. The conductor indicates the movements of acceleration and deceleration of the musical stream based on this chosen tempo. Musical accompaniments for cartoons frequently use the accelerando effect — for instance in establishing chase scenes where image and sound follow the same progression. Apart from the musical domain, we can observe this effect in many animal...

  10. NOTES
    (pp. 153-194)
  11. THEMATIC READING LIST
    (pp. 195-202)
  12. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 203-216)