Communion and Liberation Movement

Communion and Liberation Movement: A Movement in the Church

Edited by Davide Rondoni
Patrick Stevenson
Susan Scott
Copyright Date: 2000
Pages: 200
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt80r34
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    Communion and Liberation Movement
    Book Description:

    The Communion and Liberation movement began in Milan, Italy, in the 1950s as an attempt to communicate the awareness that Christ is the one true response to the deepest needs of people at every moment of history. The person who encounters and welcomes the presence of Christ undergoes a conversion that affects not only the individual but also the surrounding environment. The movement spread rapidly throughout Italy and is now present in some seventy countries around the world, including people of all ages and in every occupation at every level of society. Communion and Liberation traces the history of the movement, illuminating the main characteristics of its structure and the experiences of its members. The introduction by Monsignor Luigi Giussani is a testament to his devotion to the Church and to his followers. The appendices include Pope John Paul II's moving address to the ecclesiastic movements and the new communities within the Church and Monsignor Giussani's description of his meeting with the pope in Rome, 30 May, 1998. An inspiration to all, Communion and Liberation will be of interest to scholars of religious movements as well as to all those interested in reassessing their lives.

    eISBN: 978-0-7735-6829-7
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. INTRODUCTORY NOTE
    (pp. vii-2)

    This booklet was prepared to provide useful information about the movement called “Communion and Liberation” (CL). It is obvious that the characteristics of such a phenomenon are, by their very nature, impossible to summarize and lay out in a schematic way. We have tried, therefore, to offer a series of basic readings which start by explaining what a movement within the Catholic Church is and why CL is defined as being such a movement. Next, the essential elements of the educational proposal envisioned by Father Giussani are described. A brief biographical profile of the founder of CL is given, followed...

  4. RECOGNIZING CHRIST
    (pp. 3-17)
    Luigi Giussani

    This morning’s meditation ended with Kafka’s strikingly effective image that: “There is a point of arrival but no way.”¹ It is undeniable that there is an “unknown” (the geographers of ancient times traced the outline of what amounts to an analogue of this unknown with the famous expressionterra incognitathat marked the edge of their great sheet – along the margins of the sheet they wroteterra incognita, “unknown land”). At the edge of reality that the eye embraces, the heart feels, and the mind imagines, there is an unknown. Everyone feels it. Everyone has always felt it. Throughout the...

  5. 1 COMMUNION AND LIBERATION: A MOVEMENT
    (pp. 18-28)

    Communion and Liberation is an ecclesiastical movement founded by Msgr. Luigi Giussani; its earliest manifestations date to 1954. Having arisen in Milan and spread rapidly throughout Italy, it is now present in some seventy countries all over the world.

    CL is a reality among those movements recognized authoritatively by the Church as “co-essential”10to her own nature, in that it is “a certain way in which the relationship between God and humans, which takes the name of Christ, becomes a present reality.”¹¹ The Church, in fact, recognizes that “the charism of the Spirit always creates affinities,” and that “the Spirit,...

  6. 2 A BRIEF PROFILE OF LUIGI GIUSSANI
    (pp. 29-33)

    As is often the case with the biographies of founders of religious orders or movements, so too in the life of Msgr. Giussani it is not possible to trace one precise moment or situation in which he worked out a certain project or decided to create something new in the history of the Church. And also when one tries to identify this or that circumstance as the episode that explains what happens afterwards, one realizes that this or that episode assumes a more than ephemeral consistency from the fact that it was lived by a person who was already mysteriously...

  7. 3 A FEW WORDS OF HISTORY
    (pp. 34-72)

    Recently, in an article inL’Osservatore Romano,Msgr. Giussani wrote: “What enlivens us is love for our humanity, that is, for the expectation of fulfillment that every man feels.”17

    In tracing the origins of the CL movement, we must note at the outset that Msgr. Giussani has always said he was aware of the existence of something which only much later would be called a “movement,” because of the results and unexpected fruits that his call had generated in some young people with whom he was involved. It could be said, in fact, that the only “program” that guided Msgr....

  8. 4 A LIFE EVENT
    (pp. 73-90)

    Those who come into contact with the life of CL members are surprised, partly as a result of slogans circulating in the mass media and the ridicule to which they are often exposed, to learn that life in CL is a normal life, in the sense that adhesion to the movement does not involve any special obligations or strange customs.

    One of its characteristics, to which the movement has always held fast and which distinguishes it immediately from traditional Catholic associations, is the absence of any form of application for membership. Anyone who wants to belong to CL can do...

  9. 5 FORMS OF COMMUNITY LIFE RESULTING FROM THE CL EXPERIENCE
    (pp. 91-99)

    There follows a brief outline of some of the types of life in community to which CL has given rise and which derive directly from its special charism.

    This is the eminent group among those born from the movement, whose origins and aims it shares. It was recognized as a Lay Association under Canon Law on 11 February 1982. The decree of approval of the Fraternity’s request for recognition reads that the Holy Father himself was “benevolently pleased to encourage the Pontifical Council for the Laity” that the recognition procedure have a positive outcome. The letter accompanying the decree, signed...

  10. 6 AN EXAMPLE OF ADULT, FREE, AND RESPONSIBLE SOCIAL INITIATIVE
    (pp. 100-102)

    The Company of Works is a non-profit organization established on 11 July 1986, the result of the free initiative of young university graduates – CL members and otherwise – as a living witness to an education and a mature faith. The association’s aim is to “promote the spirit of mutual collaboration and aid for an optimal utilization of resources and energies, to aid the insertion of young people and the unemployed into the world of work, continuing the social presence of Catholics and in light of the teachings of the magisterium of the Church” (from art. 4 of the Statute).

    The Company...

  11. APPENDIX
    (pp. 103-104)
  12. HOW A MOVEMENT IS BORN
    (pp. 105-130)
  13. POPE JOHN PAUL II ADDRESSES CL ON ITS THIRTIETH ANNIVERSARY
    (pp. 131-138)
  14. LETTER FROM CARDINAL OPILIO ROSSI ACCOMPANYING THE DECREE OF RECOGNITION OF THE FRATERNITY
    (pp. 139-145)
    Opilio Card. Rossi and Paul Josef Cordes
  15. DECREE OF RECOGNITION
    (pp. 146-150)
    Opilio Card. Rossi and Paul Josef Cordes
  16. LETTER TO THE NEW MEMBERS OF THE FRATERNITY
    (pp. 151-158)
    Luigi Giussani
  17. FROM THE STATUTE OF THE MEMORES DOMINI ASSOCIATION
    (pp. 159-160)
  18. THE FULFILMENT OF A HISTORY
    (pp. 161-178)
    Luigi Giussani

    Dear Brothers and Sisters,

    1. With these words the Acts of the Apostles bring us into the heart of the Pentecost event; they show us the disciples, who, gathered with Mary in the Upper Room, receive the gift of the Spirit. Thus Jesus’ promise is fulfilled and the time of the Church begins. From that time the wind of the Spirit would carry Christ’s disciples to the very ends of the earth. It would take them even to martyrdom for their fearless witness to the Gospel.

    It is as though what happened in Jerusalem 2,000 years ago were being repeated...

  19. NOTES
    (pp. 179-182)
  20. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SELECTED WORKS
    (pp. 183-186)
  21. CONTACTING COMMUNION AND LIBERATION
    (pp. 187-187)