Anyone

Anyone: The Cosmopolitan Subject of Anthropology

Nigel Rapport
Copyright Date: 2014
Edition: 1
Published by: Berghahn Books
Pages: 238
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qd6t7
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  • Book Info
    Anyone
    Book Description:

    The significance that people grant to their affiliations as members of nations, religions, classes, races, ethnicities and genders is evidence of the vital need for a cosmopolitan project that originates in the figure of Anyone - the universal and yet individual human being. Cosmopolitanism offers an alternative to multiculturalism, a different vision of identity, belonging, solidarity and justice, that avoids the seemingly intractable character of identity politics: it identifies samenesses of the human condition that underlie the surface differences of history, culture and society, nation, ethnicity, religion, class, race and gender. This book argues for the importance of cosmopolitanism as a theory of human being, as a methodology for social science and as a moral and political program.

    eISBN: 978-0-85745-523-9
    Subjects: Anthropology, Philosophy, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-vii)
  3. LIST OF FIGURES
    (pp. viii-viii)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. ix-x)
    NJR
  5. Introduction: INTENT AND STRUCTURE
    (pp. 1-16)

    ‘Cosmopolitanism’ has a certain momentum, in politics and academia equally: a ‘growing intellectual movement’, cross-disciplinary, confident, liberal (R. Werbner 2007: x). In anthropology we are witness to a flurry of research, writing and conferring. We meet ‘plural discrepant cosmopolitanisms’ (Clifford 1998), occupational cosmopolitanism (Hannerz 2007) and ‘cosmopolitans’ as distinct from ‘locals’ (Hannerz 1990); pre-modern and modern cosmopolitans (Stade 2006), urban Caribbean cosmopolitans (Wardle 2000), diasporic Chinese cosmopolitans (ong 1998), rural Togolese cosmopolitans (Piot 1999), upper-class cosmopolitan Cairene youth (Peterson 2011), middle-class cosmopolitan Indian families (Lamb 2009), working-class Pakistani cosmopolitan migrants (P. Werbner 1999), heretical cosmopolitan Muslim intellectuals (kersten 2011), ‘instrumental,...

  6. PART 1 COSMOPOLITANISM AND COSMOPOLIS: DEFINITIONS AND ISSUES
    (pp. 17-76)

    ‘Cosmopolitanism’, it has been noted, has gained wide currency in recent years.

    For Seyla Benhabib it is a ‘key word’ of our time (Benhabib 2006: 17), once more a basis of debate in social science and social policy as well as philosophy and the humanities. ‘Once more’ because the term has a long and specific history – a long and painful history, in Ulrich Beck’s (2006: 2–3) description, recalling its recent discrediting under Nazism and Stalinism. And yet, cosmopolitanism remains an unexhausted tradition, relatively untapped: cosmopolitanism retains the promise of encouraging a ‘thinking of the unthinkable’ (R. Werbner 2008: 194),...

  7. PART 2 ‘MY NAME IS RICKEY HIRSCH’: A LIFE IN SIX ACTS, WITH MARGINALIA AND A CODA
    (pp. 77-120)

    I’ll tell you my story. My name is Rickey Hirsch, I am 84. I was born in 1924 and I grew up in Bucharest, Romania. My wife died five years ago. She was convinced she had arthritis and I could not persuade her: she refused to see how all the different symptoms in her body were connected. And then it was too late. The cancer had gotten into her bones. Now, I volunteer once a week at the hospital, visit patients with cancer. Part of an organization called ‘Hope and Cope’. Trouble is, when people see you coming they say:...

  8. PART 3 ANYONE IN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY: EVIDENCING AND ENGAGING
    (pp. 121-198)

    Having observed Anyone as an empirical reality, the intention of this part of the book is to consider the problems that arise in locating Anyone in discourses whose humanistic ethos may seem to necessitate a kind of averaging. There is an issue of inscribing the particularity of Anyone in a human science intent upon the universality of the species; and there is an issue of recognizing the particularity of Anyone in a civil society intent upon proceeding equably and equally with all.

    I first approach the question by way of subjectivity (3.1). If Anyone is capacitated to make worlds of...

  9. AFTERWORD: JEWISH COSMOPOLITANISM
    (pp. 199-208)

    ‘Rootless cosmopolitan’ (безродный космополитт) was an expression first coined by Soviet literary critic Vissarion Belinsky to describe writers who lacked Russian national character and did not possess appropriate patriotic allegiance to the Soviet Union. The term came to be widely used during Stalin’s anti-Zionist campaign of 1948 to 1953 as a euphemism for Jewish intellectuals. ‘Cosmopolitan’ deviants and parasites were now also seen to be ‘Zionist’ traitors working powerfully and surreptitiously in league with foreign bodies to overcome socialism for their particular nefarious purpose.

    APravdaarticle of 28 January 1949 initiated the aggressive stage of the state-wide campaign. It...

  10. REFERENCES
    (pp. 209-222)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 223-230)