New Paths

New Paths: Aspects of Music Theory and Aesthetics in the Age of Romanticism

John Neubauer
Janet Schmalfeldt
Scott Burnham
Susan Youens
Jim Samson
Copyright Date: 2009
Published by: Leuven University Press
Pages: 200
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qdwfw
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  • Book Info
    New Paths
    Book Description:

    New Paths, the seventh volume in the Writings of the Orpheus Institute, is a result of the third International Orpheus Academy for Music Theory. Five renowned scholars discuss a variety of topics related to romanticism, focusing especially on the years 1800–1840. In a much-needed historical and critical overview of the concept of organicism, John Neubauer ranges from its origins in Enlightenment biology to its aftermath in postmodernism. Janet Schmalfeldt shows that Beethoven’s op.47 not only should be called the Bridgetower rather than the Kreutzer Sonata, but also that this makes a difference as to its meaning. Extreme contrasts between emotional and mechanical types of music in late Beethoven are explained by Scott Burnham as stagings of the limits of human subjectivity. Jim Samson discusses Chopin’s little-known musical upbringing in Warsaw, arguing that his grounding in eighteenth-century aesthetics (as opposed to theory) has thus far been neglected. Finally, Susan Youens’ case study of Franz Lachner’s Heine songs sheds new light on radical experimentation by a so-called epigone in the period between Schubert and Schumann’s miracle song year.

    eISBN: 978-94-6166-095-4
    Subjects: Music

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. PREFACE FRESH TRACKS, RETRACINGS AND DIVERIONS
    (pp. 7-10)
    Darla M. Crispin
  4. ORGANICISM AND MUSIC THEORY
    (pp. 11-36)
    John Neubauer

    “None of the arts has been affected more deeply than music by the ideology of organicism; its baleful influence is still very much with us” — writes Joseph Kerman in his introductory volume onMusicology(SR); Christopher Norris remarks that the “powerful ideology” of organic form “acquired a central — well-nigh unquestioned — prominence in the thinking of NVth-century composers, critics and music theorists” (110).

    What do Kerman and Norris mean by “organicism”, this awkward term, and why do they condemn its effects so vehemently? I shall offer some answers, but the task will be difficult for, like all such terms, organicism has...

  5. BEETHOVEN’S “BRIDGETOWER” SONATA, OP. 47
    (pp. 37-68)
    Janet Schmalfeldt

    Excitement has long surrounded accounts of the première of Beethoven’sSonata for Piano and Violin inA, Op. 47 . We have it directly from Beethoven’s pupil Ferdinand Ries that, in the early morning hours of May 24, 1803, Beethoven summoned him to copy the violin part of the first movement as fast as possible; Beethoven’s performance, with the renowned virtuoso violinist, George Augustus Polgreen Bridgetower, was to occur at 8 o’clock in the Vienna Augartensaal. Ries reports that the piano score was “noted down only here and there” and that Bridgetower had to perform the second movement that morning...

  6. INTIMACY AND IMPERSONALITY IN LATE BEETHOVEN: CONTRAST AND THE STAGING OF SUBJECTIVITY
    (pp. 69-84)
    Scott Burnham

    One of the chapters dealing with the late quartets in Joseph Kerman’s still vital 1966 bookThe Beethoven Quartetscarries the title “Voice”. The term can cover a range of phenomena, from what Kerman calls the “sheer songfulness” of the late quartets to strikingly staged incursions of a vocal “human element” into the landscape of much of Beethoven’s late-period instrumental music. These latter include such passages as theArioso dolenteof thePiano Sonata in A-flat, Op. 110,or the melodramatic recitative in the March movement of theString Quartet in A minor, Op. 132. In the context of instrumental...

  7. OF EPIGONES, AFTERMATHS, AND ACHIEVEMENT: THE HEINE SONGS OF FRANZ LACHNER
    (pp. 85-114)
    Susan Youens

    Franz Schubert had company in his brief encounter with Heinrich Heine’s poetry at some unknown time late in his short life: two other composers resident in Vienna who were friends of Schubert in the last years of his life, were also drawn to this poet’s works. One was the Bavarian-born Franz Lachner (the other was Johann Vesque von Püttlingen, NUMP – NUUP , whose ninety-plus Heine songs anticipate Hugo Wolf in certain aspects¹). How Lachner (NUMP – NUVM) reacted to Schubert’s influence after the great composer’s death tells all sorts of tales about the attempts of those who come after genius to...

  8. CHOPIN AND THE TRADITIONS OF PEDAGOGY
    (pp. 115-128)
    Jim Samson

    I should begin by saying that it is impossible to research Chopin’s musical education in the way that Larry Todd did Mendelssohn’s.¹ In his introduction, Todd cited pedagogical research on Handel, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. He went on to speak of the dearth of comparable information on nineteenth-century masters. “We know little”, says Todd, “about Schumann’s work with Heinrich Dorn in Leipzig, Berlioz’s or Liszt’s study with Reicha in Paris, Chopin’s lessons with Elsner in Warsaw, or Brahms’s student days in Hamburg”. Naturally, I want to pick up on the Chopin reference there; but not in order to refute Todd’s...

  9. PERSONALIA
    (pp. 129-134)
  10. COLOPHON
    (pp. 135-135)