Cui dono lepidum novum libellum

Cui dono lepidum novum libellum: Dedicating Latin Works and Motets in the Sixteenth Century

Ignace BOSSUYT
Nele GABRIËLS
Dirk SACRÉ
Demmy VERBEKE
Volume: 23
Copyright Date: 2008
Published by: Leuven University Press
Pages: 334
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qdwp8
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    Cui dono lepidum novum libellum
    Book Description:

    During the sixteenth century, the traditional act of dedicating a text took on a new meaning due to the wider dissemination of the printed book. As the dedication and other paratexts thus became an almost indispensable part of the publication, they merit careful examination by those who study the presentation and impact of any printed work in its context. Paratexts bridge the gap between the outside World of the reading public and the enclosed world of the book, and often present biographical information concerning the persons involved in the making of the book. In the present volume, general reflections as well as case studies in the field of paratexts to Latin works and to musical compositions on Latin texts consider and exemplify these as well as other aspects of paratexts. The multidisciplinary perspective further enriches the insight in form, function and nature of the dedicatory act in the sixteenth century. A synthesis of the nature of the sixteenth-century dedication is thus presented, relevant not only to Neo-Latinists and musicologists, but also to (book) historians, philologists, and others.

    eISBN: 978-94-6166-054-1
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. III-IV)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. V-VI)
  3. FOREWORD
    (pp. VII-VIII)
    Ignace Bossuyt and Dirk Sacré

    In 2001, the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven provided a grant for an interdisciplinary research project concerning ‘The Latin Dedications of the Motet Editions of the Franco-Flemish Polyphonists from the Second Half of the Sixteenth Century as Musical and Literary Sources’. Based on the realisation that Renaissance editions of music as a rule contained dedicatory letters and/or other liminary texts which are a mine of information for both musicological and Neo-Latin research but were largely neglected in modern scholarship, the project embarked on a systematic interdisciplinary examination of these texts, combining Latin philological and musicological expertise.

    The corpus was restricted toEinzeldrucke...

  4. INTRODUCTION: THE DEDICATION AS PARATEXT
    (pp. 1-12)
    Mary S. Lewis

    The essays in this volume all deal with aspects of dedications of Latin writings and motets. In most cases, the writers have examined the dedications in the larger context of the overall paratextual apparatus of the publication in question — that is, as related to titles, title pages, illustrations, dedications, poetry, tables of contents, headings, and notes.

    The termparatextwas first coined by the French literary theorist Gérard Genette in hisSeuilsof 1987.¹ He used the term to describe all visual and verbal elements that are included with the texts and that present the texts to the public. Paratexts...

  5. “VOBIS PAGINA NOSTRA DEDICATUR”: DEDICATION IN CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY
    (pp. 13-34)
    Harm-Jan Van Dam

    In the French novelLe roman bourgeoisof 1666 an imaginary book in four volumes is introduced which offers a complete discussion of literary dedication. The curious reader, fobbed off with no more than its table of contents, learns that the second chapter is entitled ‘whether dedication of a book is absolutely necessary. This question is answered in the negative, against the view of several ancient and modern authors’.¹ Although it is true that dedication of a book was not absolutely necessary in antiquity, most ancient authors (and readers) would consider it normal, indeed essential, for literature immortalizes both the...

  6. RECIPROCAL AUTHORISATION: THE FUNCTION OF DEDICATIONS AND DEDICATORY PREFACES IN THE 15TH- AND 16TH-CENTURY ‘ARTES ANTIQUITATIS’
    (pp. 35-48)
    Karl A.E. Enenkel

    This inquiry focuses on a group of texts which have hardly been studied in the last two hundred years: the dedications of early modern Latin treatises on the culture of Roman antiquity and on Roman archaeology. This lacuna may be partly due to the fact that modern scholarship has unjustly neglected the study of archaeology and Roman cultural history during the early modern period. TheArs antiquitatis, however, represents one of the most intriguing and rapid developments in humanist scholarship during the 15thand 16thcenturies; it was an impressive effort to achieve a new understanding of antiquity and its...

  7. “ERGO CAPE ET CANTA SANCTOS QUOS FECIMUS HYMNOS”: PRELIMINARIES IN SIXTEENTH-CENTURY MOTET EDITIONS BY COMPOSERS FROM THE LOW COUNTRIES
    (pp. 49-64)
    Demmy Verbeke

    Scholarly interest in so-called “paratexts” (texts which accompany other texts and influence their use and understanding) has gradually grown after the publication of influential studies by Jacques Derrida¹ and Gérard Genette.² Various scholars soon became aware of the fact that books published in the Early Modern Period are of specific relevance for the study of these paratexts, because their form and effect changed significantly owing to the alterations in the production and distribution of books after the invention of the printing press.³ This statement is true for all sorts of publications from the Renaissance, and so also for Renaissance editions...

  8. READING (BETWEEN) THE LINES: WHAT DEDICATIONS CAN TELL US
    (pp. 65-80)
    Nele Gabriëls

    As source material, the dedication encloses multiple layers of meaning. This equally applies to the dedicatory texts included in the motet prints of the second half of the sixteenth century. Revealing the various meanings of these texts in connection to the music and music history was one of the musicological goals at the outset of the research project concerningThe Latin dedications of the motet editions by the Franco-Flemish polyphonists from the second half of the sixteenth century as musical and literary sources.¹ A thorough reading of the dedications can expand knowledge of musical and socio-musical history, for it has...

  9. DEDICATING MUSIC MANUSCRIPTS: ON FUNCTION AND FORM OF PARATEXTS IN FIFTEENTH- AND SIXTEENTH-CENTURY SOURCES
    (pp. 81-108)
    Thomas Schmidt-Beste

    One reads a great deal about dedications in the printed book — and this volume is indeed given over almost exclusively to the study of printed music and printed literature as well. On the other hand, one reads very little about dedications in manuscripts — for the simple fact that few exist. This lack has attracted surprisingly little attention in the literature on the history of the book. When describing the ‘Printing Press as an Agent of Change’ (Elizabeth Eisenstein),¹ much is made of the way in which — at first — printing imitated manuscript production, and much is made of the new modes...

  10. “TO THE BENEVOLENT READER…”: DEDICATIONS ATTACHED TO EDITIONS OF NEO-LATIN PLAYS IN THE NETHERLANDS OF THE 16TH AND THE 17TH CENTURY – FORMS, FUNCTIONS AND RELIGIOUS STANDPOINTS
    (pp. 109-126)
    Jan Bloemendal

    Theatre is a specific medium. This also holds true for the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Most of the plays written are meant to be staged at a particular event, at a particular place for a particular audience. In the sixteenth century Latin comedies were staged by Latin schoolmasters and their pupils for their fellow pupils and others, e. g. parents and the city council. By writing these plays therectoresimitated the comedies of the Roman playwrights Plautus and Terence, but they often used biblical subjects instead of the pagan and morally damaging themes they saw in their Roman models....

  11. “AEQUABIT LAUDES NULLA CAMENA TUAS”: POETRY AND MUSIC IN LATIN LAUDATORY MOTETS
    (pp. 127-140)
    Victoria Panagl

    ‘No Muse is able to praise you in an adequate way.’ This sentence — a pentameter in the original Latin — is the cantus firmus and the motto of a laudatory motet dealing with dedicatory topoi, Orlando di Lasso’sSi qua tibi obtulerint.¹ The cantus firmus, which deals with a literary commonplace, states two things: it praises the addressee as a person whose glory is so great that even the Muses, the “best artists”, cannot find the right words for praise, and simultaneously says that the poet is attempting to praise the addressee in a very skillful way. In some respect, the...

  12. CONSTRUCTING THE IMAGE OF A HUMANIST SCHOLAR. LATIN DEDICATIONS IN HUNGARY AND THE USE OF ADAGES (1460-1525)
    (pp. 141-160)
    Farkas Gábor Kiss

    Humanist dedication was an ambivalent and delicate matter, as Peter Schaeffer pointed out: “Within the curious dialectic of humility and self-confidence, the exigency of belittling his own literary merit while also advertising his achievement, the author or editor had to find precisely the right tone to play with the received conventions, so as to state explicitly on one side of the apparent contradiction without sounding so convincing as not to leave room for an implicit understanding of the other.”¹ The author of the work, the dedicatee, and the author of the dedication (if he was different from the author) all...

  13. BEYOND THE MUSIC-THEORETICAL DISCOURSE IN FRANCHINO GAFFURIO’S TRILOGY: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PARATEXTS CONTEMPLATING THE MAGIC TRIANGLE BETWEEN AUTHOR, OPUS, AND AUDIENCE
    (pp. 161-194)
    Walter Kurt Kreyszig

    The central role accorded to the dedication of published Latin works and motets in the sixteenth century had its equivalent in the published books on music theory. This tradition dates back to the year 1480, which marks the first publication in music theory in theTheoricum opus musice disciplineof Franchino Gaffurio (1451-1522).¹ For Gaffurio, the launching of his first major treatise also paved the way for three further volumes,² all printed in Milan,³ namely, the revised version of the initial publication in the Theorica musice (1492),The central role accorded to the dedication of published Latin works and motets in...

  14. “ACCIPE NON NOTI PRAECLARIA VOLUMINA MUNDI”: LES DÉDICACES DU DE ORBE NOVO DE PIERRE MARTYR D’ANGHIERA
    (pp. 195-216)
    Brigitte Gauvin

    Pierre Martyr d’Anghiera, savant italien, quitta à trente ans l’Italie pour s’installer à la cour d’Espagne où il passa le reste de son existence. Grand épistolier, il a laissé un nombre considérable de missives sur les événements d’Europe qui sont une aide précieuse pour les historiens, et, à côté de celles-ci, un ensemble de lettres, consacrées uniquement à la découverte et la conquête du Nouveau Monde, intituléDe Orbe Nouo Decadesou plus simplementDe Orbe Nouo, rédigé entre 1493 et 1526, date de sa mort. Dans ces lettres, adressées à divers interlocuteurs essentiellement Italiens ou résidant en Italie, tous de...

  15. DÉDICACES ET INSCRIPTIONS LATINES DANS LES LIVRES DE MUSIQUE POUR VIHUELA (1536-1576)
    (pp. 217-250)
    Paloma Otaola González

    Parmi les nouveautés que la Renaissance instaure dans le domaine musical, on peut signaler le développement de la musique instrumentale et le goût pour la monodie accompagnée. Les livres de musique pour vihuela, imprimés en Espagne entre 1536 et 1576 témoignent de ces changements. Sept d’entre eux sont des recueils de musique pour vihuela seule ou pour vihuela et chant, en incluant quelques pièces pour guitare.¹ Deux autres sont des recueils de musique instrumentale pour clavier, harpe et vihuela: leLibro de cifra nuevade Venegas de Henestrosa et lesObras de músicade Cabezón.²

    On a très peu d’informations...

  16. “PER PATRONOS, NON PER MERITA GRADUS EST EMERGENDI”: LIPSIUS’S CAREFUL CHOICE OF PATRONI AS AWAY OF CAREER PLANNING
    (pp. 251-268)
    Jeanine De Landtsheer

    From the first century A.D. on, starting a work with a dedicatory letter had become quite fashionable. Author and dedicatee could be equals (friends), but more often the relation was one of subordination (clienspatronus). In bothcases, though, the mechanism was essentially the same: the former had obtained a service or a gift from the other and thus felt obliged to repay this service or gift by showing gratitude through presenting a work. According to the rules of thears rhetorica, which prescribed a humble approach in the preface, the author would express doubt about his own capacities either to...

  17. LES DÉDICACES LATINES DES LIVRES DE MOTETS DE RENÉ DEL MEL (ca. 1554-ca. 1598)
    (pp. 269-292)
    Emilie Corswarem

    La dédicace comme procédé de double présentation — celle du recueil de musique et celle du compositeur — est illustrée de manière éloquente chez René del Mel.¹ Précieux à l’historien de la musique, les textes dédicatoires de ses quatre recueils de musique religieuse et treize recueils de musique profane conservés livrent des indications plus ou moins précises relatives à sa biographie, à la chronologie de ses oeuvres mais aussi à ses ambitions, ses employeurs et dans une certaine mesure, à la réception de sa musique. Outre quelques rares mentions dans les archives, le contenu de ces textes constitue la source quasi unique...

  18. DEDICATION AND DEVOTION IN SIMONE MOLINARO’S MOTECTORUM QUINIS, ET MISSAE DENIS VOCIBUS, LIBER PRIMUS (1597)
    (pp. 293-316)
    Peter S. Poulos

    Simone Molinaro (ca. 1570-1636) was a leading musician in Genoa who rose to the position of chapel master at the cathedral of San Lorenzo in 1601, and later held the same title at the ducal palace. Molinaro’s name first appears on record in 1589 as the nephew and disciple of Giovanni Battista Dalla Gostena on the title page of the latter’s Il secondo libro di canzonette a quattro voci.¹Dalla Gostena was chapel master at San Lorenzo from 1584 to 1589 and exerted a deep influence on the musical life of his nephew. While Dalla Gostena had published no sacred the...

  19. INDICES
    (pp. 317-326)